#1
So me and my band want to record an E.P./few songs right now but don't really have the cash to go to a studio and get that done.We really want to have material to show to people without the quality of our song recordings getting in the way.We're trying to play local shows and get out name out there and having some of our material recorded would REALLY help.
So this is the part where you come in;I currently own a simple mixer with phantom power that has a usb out that I use as an interface, An at2020 microphone,a couple decent guitars, and a whole bunch of other semi useful stuff.Now i've heard a bunch of your guy's take on other peoples songs and making them sound a million times better
So I was wondering if anyone on here would be willing to help me and my band get some recordings done?I could record DIs of the guitars and bass, try to mic the drum kit as best as i could with 2 mics.( yeah I know, I know.)And record vocals as dry as possible. I'm not expecting the best quality in the world but I would really appreciate it if someone could lend me a hand with this since i'm not a recording expert by no means.

TL;DR: Help mix/master some of my bands material?


I know i'm asking for a lot but hey the holidays are near and who doesn't love the joy of giving.
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#2
I'd like to give it a try. I'm not great (I've never even mixed vocals before), but I'd like some practice.
37N
#3
I'm currently on a sound engineering course, which involves mixing and mastering.

I'd be able to mix it for you for free, as I need experience in that anyway, but if I'm mastering I'd want money, it's something that takes a lot of time and skill to get right. I don't think you'd find anybody who would master it for you for free and do a half decent job of it.

Anyway, a little bit of advice. Instead of DI'ing the guitar and bass, pop both the microphones in front of the amplifier and record it through them. Make sure the microphones are both the same distance away from the amp otherwise you could get something called phasing.

If you'd like me to mix, put your barebones tracks on SoundCloud, make sure they are downloadable, then PM me a link and I'll have a bash at mixing em for you.
#4
Quote by Andalus
Anyway, a little bit of advice. Instead of DI'ing the guitar and bass, pop both the microphones in front of the amplifier and record it through them. Make sure the microphones are both the same distance away from the amp otherwise you could get something called phasing.

I would NOT suggest this.

Unless you're experienced with micing your cabinet and have decent equipment to do it, DIing is a much better idea, as whoever's mixing it for you can then reamp it through whatever amp they want, or use whatever amp sim they want. If you don't know what you're doing, the mixing engineer is going to have a hell of a job trying to make the tracks work in the mix.

I have mixed bands before who think they know what they're doing and send me amp tracks instead of DIs. Nearly all of them, I've ended up passing on after realizing it would be too much work to get the sound to the quality I'd like it to be at, because they didn't know what they were doing when they recorded the tracks. DIs are always the safest bet, unless you're recording in a professional studio who knows what they're doing. Even then, they'd provide you with both amp'd and DI tracks if you weren't using them for mixing.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#5
Quote by MatrixClaw
I would NOT suggest this.

Unless you're experienced with micing your cabinet and have decent equipment to do it, DIing is a much better idea, as whoever's mixing it for you can then reamp it through whatever amp they want, or use whatever amp sim they want. If you don't know what you're doing, the mixing engineer is going to have a hell of a job trying to make the tracks work in the mix.

I have mixed bands before who think they know what they're doing and send me amp tracks instead of DIs. Nearly all of them, I've ended up passing on after realizing it would be too much work to get the sound to the quality I'd like it to be at, because they didn't know what they were doing when they recorded the tracks. DIs are always the safest bet, unless you're recording in a professional studio who knows what they're doing. Even then, they'd provide you with both amp'd and DI tracks if you weren't using them for mixing.


DIs are a safer bet, yes, I admit. But, in my experience, if you have the equipment to do it, it's better to use the amp and mic it. Of course, what we do is use a DI box so you have both the clean signal and the amp signal, but something recorded through the microphone will 90% of the time sound better unless it is set up or mixed incompetently. You get the tone of the amp, any pedals, the microphone, and you can mix it with the clean signal if you use a DI box. If you're looking for a unique tone, far better to do this rather than just plugging into a computer and using Cubase's guitar rig...
#6
Quote by Andalus
DIs are a safer bet, yes, I admit. But, in my experience, if you have the equipment to do it, it's better to use the amp and mic it. Of course, what we do is use a DI box so you have both the clean signal and the amp signal, but something recorded through the microphone will 90% of the time sound better unless it is set up or mixed incompetently. You get the tone of the amp, any pedals, the microphone, and you can mix it with the clean signal if you use a DI box. If you're looking for a unique tone, far better to do this rather than just plugging into a computer and using Cubase's guitar rig...

Sure, but when you're talking about a band who is inexperienced with recording, the tone is likely to come out far worse than it would if you just used DIs, especially if they're using poor amps. Not to mention, if there are any mistakes or timing issues (which there is likely to be with beginners), it's much easier to fix them with a DI than it is with an amp'd track.

Better to eliminate as many variables as possible, unless you know the person tracking is experienced enough to provide you with workable tracks.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#7
Quote by MatrixClaw
Sure, but when you're talking about a band who is inexperienced with recording, the tone is likely to come out far worse than it would if you just used DIs. Not to mention, if there are any mistakes or timing issues (which there is likely to be with beginners), it's much easier to fix them with a DI than it is with an amp'd track.


Good points, but surely not much can go wrong if you use a DI box? Best of both worlds in my experience.
#8
Quote by Andalus
Good points, but surely not much can go wrong if you use a DI box? Best of both worlds in my experience.

Sure, but not everyone has the money to buy a DI box, or uses a DI box even if they could afford it
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#9
Quote by MatrixClaw
Sure, but not everyone has the money to buy a DI box, or uses a DI box even if they could afford it


True that, one of the main reasons I applied for my course was free use of professional studios