#1
Hey guys.. So i have been playing guitar for a couple of years on and off.. but never really practised any techniques or anything.. purely just learnt songs from tabs and played along.. now I haven't really got any better and have hit the wall so to speak.. The level i am up to is playing some of the easier Metallica solos such as fade to black intro solo and nothing else matters.. which is pretty woeful considering how long I have been playing.. So my question is what kind of structure should I bring to my guitar playing to increase my overall skill.. What should I focus on and where should I look for the info ill need to start..

Thanks in advance and apologies if this is in the wrong thread
Quote by srq89
yeah easily, I took on one of my uncles who's suppose to be the strongest in the family and has the hottest wife. Tamed him like my bitch and then wacked off afterward thinking about his wife.

All in all, a very productive day.
#2
play those songs that you like, maybe take harder metallica songs and learn from them. try creating your own songs and always push yourself to the limit. when i was playing with a friend we couldn't play our new songs for like 1 week after finishing them because they are too hard at the time.
to increase your overall playing you need speed, try learning master of puppets. if you want to play other genres try tranquil by darkest hour, that song taught me alot.
speaking about techniques alternate picking might be the most important to learn and if you like metal maybe sweep picking eventually
these are few cents from my experience, hope it helped
#3
Honestly, in my opinion, the best way to get better at something is to enjoy doing it. What do you want to be able to do on your guitar? Do you want to be able to play along with songs, write your own songs, be able to jam with friends or all of the above?
It's much easier once you know what your goal is tbh.
Basically, you get better by playing a lot, and if you practise things you enjoy doing, you'll play a lot and therefore get better.

Having said that, I don't know if you know any theory, but knowing the notes you're playing , learning how (simple) chords are built up and learning how to play and apply the major scale all over the neck really helped me.

EDIT: it's probably too hard for you to play it at normal speed, but you could check out Six by All that remains. Absolutely stuffed with good technique excersises - alternate picking, downpicking, palm muting, it's got a clean section.. just a thought
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
Last edited by LordPino at Dec 10, 2011,
#4
Quote by LordPino
Honestly, in my opinion, the best way to get better at something is to enjoy doing it. What do you want to be able to do on your guitar? Do you want to be able to play along with songs, write your own songs, be able to jam with friends or all of the above?
It's much easier once you know what your goal is tbh.
Basically, you get better by playing a lot, and if you practise things you enjoy doing, you'll play a lot and therefore get better.

Having said that, I don't know if you know any theory, but knowing the notes you're playing , learning how (simple) chords are built up and learning how to play and apply the major scale all over the neck really helped me.

EDIT: it's probably too hard for you to play it at normal speed, but you could check out Six by All that remains. Absolutely stuffed with good technique excersises - alternate picking, downpicking, palm muting, it's got a clean section.. just a thought


Yeah I agree with you when you say I should enjoy what I play which I do.. and with the theory I have a very basic knowledge.. I am interested in learning more however.. Where should I start though?
Quote by srq89
yeah easily, I took on one of my uncles who's suppose to be the strongest in the family and has the hottest wife. Tamed him like my bitch and then wacked off afterward thinking about his wife.

All in all, a very productive day.
#5
We got some pretty good stuff in the lesson section:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/
I really recommend
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

Try and see if you understand the first 5 chapters or so of that guide, that should get you started There's quite some stuff you gotta learn before music theory actually starts making sense, but once you get the basics, a lot of stuff you play makes sense.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
#6
The theory is a good start.

You need a practice routine though,
Answer this questions for a more detailed answer:

Long Term goal/s with your instrument:
Short Term goal/s with your instrument:
How many hours a day/week are you willing to practice:
Your favourite guitarist:
#7
Quote by Slashiepie
The theory is a good start.

You need a practice routine though,
Answer this questions for a more detailed answer:

Long Term goal/s with your instrument:
Short Term goal/s with your instrument:
How many hours a day/week are you willing to practice:
Your favourite guitarist:


Long term would be to be able to hear a chord progression and be able to solo over it and have it sound good lol

Short term would be to increase my speed and accuracy and i guess start to be able to improvise

I could get it to an hour a day or so depending on work

Fav guitarist.. I love slash, angus young and then also john petrucci and satriani
Quote by srq89
yeah easily, I took on one of my uncles who's suppose to be the strongest in the family and has the hottest wife. Tamed him like my bitch and then wacked off afterward thinking about his wife.

All in all, a very productive day.
#8
Quote by shan0_
Long term would be to be able to hear a chord progression and be able to solo over it and have it sound good lol

Short term would be to increase my speed and accuracy and i guess start to be able to improvise

I could get it to an hour a day or so depending on work

Fav guitarist.. I love slash, angus young and then also john petrucci and satriani



Damn, 1 hour is little for petrucci and satch level practice so we will have to stay with slash.


Everyday do:

10 minutes of aural training
10 minutes reading about music theory. (start with intervals and learning the fretboard)

For acuraccy and speed you will practice everything extremely slow.
To get the most of the rest of time you will have to combine scales with slow practice.

20 minutes practicing scales incredibly slow. (when you feel you have them down, sing them and skip strings)
10 minutes learning chords and practicing progressions.
10 minutes of improv. (can you make them 20? that way you can put all the things you practiced to use in a more creative way) - you can also learn songs during this phase if thats what you want, but improvising will get you there faster..

I think this will get you there, the progress will be slow becasue 1 hour is little time, but if you really concentrate and are consistent, you will make steady progress.

What scales do you know already?
Last edited by Slashiepie at Dec 10, 2011,
#9
Quote by Slashiepie

10 minutes of aural training
10 minutes reading about music theory. (start with intervals and learning the fretboard)



10 minutes a day?!

You'd be far better off dedicating an hour a week and then going over things in a 10 minute session each day rather than doing 10 minutes a day only. You'll barely have opened the book and done an exercise before it's time to move on to practicing something else.

Seriously, if you dedicate an hour a day to a different exercise, eg monday alt picking, tuesday sweeping, etc. and then go over this every day, even if it's just practicing a lick you learnt, then you'll find that you learn so much more than if you try and do everything in 1 day.
#10
Quote by Aleene
10 minutes a day?!

You'd be far better off dedicating an hour a week and then going over things in a 10 minute session each day rather than doing 10 minutes a day only. You'll barely have opened the book and done an exercise before it's time to move on to practicing something else.


Memory works way better in short time intervals with many brief repetitions,
intense concentration bursts that exhaust it are not the most efficient approach.


Quote by Aleene

Seriously, if you dedicate an hour a day to a different exercise, eg monday alt picking, tuesday sweeping, etc. and then go over this every day, even if it's just practicing a lick you learnt, then you'll find that you learn so much more than if you try and do everything in 1 day.


Nah it is more efficient to do the same things everyday untill you master them, then you move on, practicing different things on different days takes way too long and doesnt offer solid progress so efficiently.

And dude save the drama it is just 5 different things in one day and each one builds up on the next one.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Dec 10, 2011,
#11
Quote by Slashiepie

Memory works way better in short time intervals with many brief repetitions,
intense concentration bursts that exhaust it are not the most efficient approach.

Nah it is more efficient to do the same things everyday untill you master them, then you move on, practicing different things on different days takes way too long and doesnt offer solid progress so efficiently.

And dude save the drama it is just 5 different things in one day and each one builds up on the next one.


I don't even know how to word my reply. I've written it out 3 times already and each one makes me sound like a complete dick.

I meant that if he spent say, a half hour on learning something new, then he could read the lesson/whatever, then apply the lesson in the form of a lick. Then to spend the rest of the time making sure that you have the lick down, using this time to play it slowly and efficiently. Then every day you can spend 10 minutes on that lick, and also learn/practice something new.
It's kind of like when you first learnt math. You didn't learn to add, subtract, divide and multiply all in the same lesson for a week. You learnt them one at a time and then keep doing the exercises in subsequent lessons.

And for the drama, really it was the music theory thing.I just don't think you can seriously suggest that spending 10 minutes learning theory is a good idea. Maybe very basic, like time signatures, but it can take a long time to ensure that you actually understand what you've learnt, not just that you know what the symbol means or what the interval is.

There is one thing I agree on though
Quote by Slashpie
For acuraccy and speed you will practice everything extremely slow.