#1
Hey, I have a Line 6 Pod X3 and have heard that I can get much better sound if I mic'ed my amp. Still though in my most recent cover I used a tone that I thought was quite impressive.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JV2RrdXG2q0&feature=related

It's only one guitar track as well. I used the dual amp thing though. Right at the end I decided to try two guitar tracks. However I didn't change much of the tone for the second track so I think it was a failed attempt. Overall in the video though what do you think of this tone in comparison to professionally made stuff?
#2
Are you playing over the originally recorded track or a backing track?
#3
Mic's capture the actual sound of your amp as if you're listening to yourself playing it. While the alternative (digitally recording) basically just sounds like crap in my opinion. I'm sure if you mic'd your amp you'd notice infinite differences in tone and quality.
#4
Quote by Deadlyduck
Mic's capture the actual sound of your amp as if you're listening to yourself playing it. While the alternative (digitally recording) basically just sounds like crap in my opinion. I'm sure if you mic'd your amp you'd notice infinite differences in tone and quality.

And with the middle sentence (and the first, if we get pedantic) you have just shown that you don't know as much as you think on this subject and your opinion about the quality of one or the other is therefore tinted with ignorance.

Mic's capture whatever soundwaves enter their capsule at that position in the environment, and no mic will have a flat frequency response, so they then colour what they hear based on the design of the microphone capsule, as well as the type of microphone and the components used. If we get even more pedantic, you then have the issue of long microphone cables having a different capacitance level to shorter ones, which can affect the roll-off of treble/high end. Then you have the preamps powering the mic, which will invariably add a fair amount of colouration again, before you then decide, or rather get to the point where the signal is, either kept analogue or converted into a digital one to record into a computer or hardware-based DAW - which, you guessed it, adds colouration again.

So to cut a long lecture short, no matter what you use, you will not capture the exact same sound you hear in the room, but have to do your best to match that tone with the equipment you have, or even to better the tone if your results are not as great as you would wish for.

Don't even think I need to go into mic placement, effect of room/environment (even air pressure and temperature affect the tonal balance) etc.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Dec 11, 2011,
#5
All you did was try to prove what I said was wrong, at least try to help the guy out. Everyone has their own opinions man.
#6
i can give more comments tomorrow as my internet is being really slow so i can only hear like 2 seconds at a time before it buffers for 20 seconds just to play another 2 seconds, but from what i hear:

if you were to add bass guitar then your tone would be to bassy for recording.

its a decent live tone (which is what you need for that video) but if you had quality recording with a song with full instrumentation your guitar is too bassy