#1
I recently rebuilt my squier with ALL dimarzio parts (pickups, pots, jack, ect). It has three lil humbuckers, but when it is in the neck or bridge position, it buzzes like crazy! the mid pickup is extremely quiet. the guitar has a ground wire and it is just confusing me. Any help would be great!
#3
Have you shielded the cavities in the body of the guitar? I'm assuming squiers aren't shielded stock.
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#4
I used to have to same problem. The thing that could be wrong is that the earth may not be connected correctly, make sure you search on google images a picture of the wiring, i have seen many 'home' repairs done the slightest bit wrong. The other thing that it could be is that your earth to your house may not be wired in properly, you can fix this by contacting a plumber/electrician. They will know what to do. Leave it to the professionals! Its always best. Hope this helps.
#5
The buzzing does not go away if i touch any metal parts. It's really annoying, the mid pickup is SILENT while the neck and bridge (the two that I primarily use) sound like bees. i did shield the cavity with copper shielding and that apparently has not helped. How would you recommend redoing the earth connection so it works?
#6
Which wiring diagram did you use? How and where did you connect the bridge ground wire? Did you star ground everything? Did you check every single ground connection to make sure its 100% electrically sound? Do you have any photos?

To be honest, we have little information.
#8
Thats a 5 position switch. Do you get mega buzz when you select the bucker combos as oppossed to selecting buckers solo? Are you confident the switch is operating perfectly?

It really shouldn't buzz so much that its a problem in any setting. Firstly, double check with a continuity meter all your ground connections, make sure all your grounds have low resistance path back to your input jack, on all switch settings. You don't need to plug the guitar in to test this. Get a meter and check them.

If it all checks out then you only need to expose as much of the hot wires (coloured black) from each of the pickup cables to the selector switch as is needed to solder to the switch terminal. Don't leave inches of hot wire exposed, this acts as an antenna for hum and electrical noise. The green and bare grounds of the pickup cables all ground back to the one point (your star ground). This appears to be the volume pot in your case.

Second, not sure if you wired it up exactly as its drawn on the schematic, but you should use shielded cable from the input jack to the volume pot. The diagram shows seperated hot wire and ground wire. This acts as an antenna for noise. Again expose only as much of the hot conductor as is needed to solder to the pot lug and the shield ground of the cable solders to the back of the volume pot and also to the input jack. All the other auxilliary single cable connections to and from the switch should also be in shielded cables (not just single wires as shown), with the shields soldered to the back of the volume pot

All your ground leads solder to the back of the pot. In the diagram where it has a ground lead from the tone pot to the end pot, is not good technique. Solder the ground lead from the end pot case direct to the volume pot. Solder the ground lead from the tone pot case to the volume pot. Don't loop in and loop out. Star ground all your ground wires back to the volume pot.

Your cavity shields should be grounded back to (you guessed it) the back of the volume pot. Your bridge ground wire, solders to the back of the volume pot. Double check and make sure your ground wire connection to the bridge for both ends is solid and fully conductive as this is a safety item as well as a noise reduction item. Put conductive copper shielding on the back of the scratchplate. This will auto ground because the volume pot metal casing will connect to it. Check your selector switch casing is grounded also.

The pickup cables which have you connect each of the red and white wires together and taped off, only expose as much red and white conductor needed to do this, for all three pickups. Don't leave lengths of unshielded hot wires floating around.

If you get any photos going I'd be keen to see the photos of what you have cabled up
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 12, 2011,
#9
i think it is probably think it is probably because i have too much hot wire exposed. I will post a few pictures in about 30 minutes of the ground wire and the wiring under the pick guard. thank you for your help by the way. its very useful!
#11
uh.. on the back of the pots, you should have the 3 black wires from the pickups, one wire going to the output and one wire going to the trem claw. It looks like you're missing a few wires there? or maybe not.

Did you by chance ground the hot wires of the pickups instead of the black ones? Or connect the output wrong (on the jack: switched the hot and ground?)?


Also, from experience you dont need to worry about using shielded wire... Its a bit excessive unless you're exposed to an abnormal amount of interference.
Last edited by michaelbot9000 at Dec 12, 2011,
#12
no everything is in the right place, the hot wires (black wires) go to the selector switch. I;m thinking a few of the hot wires are just over exposed and ill just try covering them with electrical tape. and see if it works.
#13
Quote by conor1423
no everything is in the right place, the hot wires (black wires) go to the selector switch. I;m thinking a few of the hot wires are just over exposed and ill just try covering them with electrical tape. and see if it works.


No no. Elec tape alone won't work, its not conductive.

New out of the box the pickup cables are shielded right? The shielding around the hot wire acts as a noise shield and helps stop external interference from getting into the hot wire to begin with. Otherwise noise gets passed into your amp along with the signal from the pickup, then being amplified and getting that annoying buzz.

When you strip back the shielding to get to the hot wire to solder it to the switch, you're "exposing" the hot wire. A small amount is ok, it won't pick up a lot of noise. But if you strip back too much of the shielded part and "expose" inches of hot wire, all that hot wire floating around (like inches of it) it acts as an antenna and picks up all sorts of crap elec interference

You only want to expose enough hot wire to be able to terminate to the switch and ground the shielding to the pot

The more shielding you cut back = more noise entry. This is true for all terminations you make using shielded wiring.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 13, 2011,
#14
ok i think you're really over estimating how much effect a few inches of unshielded wire has... My squier has fender single coil pups. No shielding, just cloth insulated wire. They're all single coils and I havent shielded the inside of the cavity any more than what it came with. I have next to no noise on pos 1 3 and 5 with nothing on pos 2 and 4.

definitely wont hurt to use extreme shielding but i dont think thats the problem. If buzzing doesnt go away when you touch your bridge/ strings (any buzzing drop at all) then you have a grounding problem to my knowledge
#15
Maybe. But I custom modded all my guitars with cavity shields and shielded cabling with single star grounds. The result is complete silence, even when I crank my amp to 11 with the amp gain maxxed. Thats while not touching any part of the guitar and my gear is in a room with flouro lighting. It all depends what you're willing to put up with. When I play and hold a note I want to hear the note sustain and fade to nothing, not into buzzing. Once you have a guitar with a excellent noise immunity you can't go back. 99% of guitar looms (even boutique expensive brands) are rubbish.

The first suggestion was to check all the grounding before anything else. If the grounding 100% checks out then need to look elsewhere. The cabling is the next logical step.

Poor grounds and shields can have more of an effect than you realise. You can't translate your squier across all guitars. But don't take my word for it. Check this link:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1032138
#17
So you think the problem is that i have too much hot wire exposed or that the star ground should all be in one spot instead of two like i did. because in pic 6 the red wire is the ground...
#18
Quote by conor1423
So you think the problem is that i have too much hot wire exposed or that the star ground should all be in one spot instead of two like i did. because in pic 6 the red wire is the ground...


First to check is the bridge electrically connected to the pot. Its the red wire. I can see the red wire soldered to the trem claw at one end and soldered to the pot at the other end. If thats the case when you touch the bridge the noise should decrease slightly. Make sure the wire isnt broken internally. A multi meter, or just a battery some leads and a small light globe can test this. Test the continuity also makes it all the way to the output jack ring.

You should ground everything to one pot anyway regardless. If you have two main ground points then move them all over to the volume pot.

So make sure the bridge is a solid connection and reconfigure to one ground point then re-test your noise again.

If its stil bad, then you need to work on the length of all your exposed hot wires.

Take it systematically, one step at a time. Let us know what you find.
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 13, 2011,
#19
One thing you need to be aware of before proceeding any further with this. You have Dimarzio pickups and parts. You are using a Seymour Duncan wiring diagram. Why? Dimarzio uses different color codes than Seymour Duncan. Normally Dimarzio hots are Red. Seymour Duncan hots are Black. You might want to consider looking at Dimarzio diagrams to figure this out.

It would help if you mention exactly what pickups you are installing. There may be some Dimarzio's that are wired differently. Dimarzio's site has diagrams for each specific pickup.
Last edited by poppameth at Dec 13, 2011,
#20
I just turned it all on and when I touched the bridge, it made no difference in buzz whatsoever. Like I said the buzz is only there when I am using the neck or bridge pickup. Phoenix v you said to ground all of the pots. To do that would I just continue the red ground wire to the 2 tone knobs? I'm sorry for not knowing a lot, I'm doing this as a learning experience to get to know guitars inside and out. So far ive learned a lot. And poppameth, the pickups are HS-3. Also if the diagram didn't work, I think that the buzz would be the least of my worries along with no response from the pickups.
Last edited by conor1423 at Dec 13, 2011,
#21
Quote by conor1423
I just turned it all on and when I touched the bridge, it made no difference in buzz whatsoever. Like I said the buzz is only there when I am using the neck or bridge pickup. Phoenix v you said to ground all of the pots. To do that would I just continue the red ground wire to the 2 tone knobs? I'm sorry for not knowing a lot, I'm doing this as a learning experience to get to know guitars inside and out. So far ive learned a lot. And poppameth, the pickups are HS-3.



Wire the cases of the two tone pots back to the case of the volume pot. Do this with one wire from one tone pot to the volume pot, then use a different wire from the other tone pot to the volume pot. Don't loop the same wire across all 3 pots. The volume pot is same pot that the red bridge wire and input jack ground wires are soldered to.

Poppa is also correct. Your HS-3 pickups, the red is the hot wire, the green is the ground, the black and white are twisted/soldered together and taped off

If you connected the black to the switch, the green to ground and taped the red off with the white, youve connected what is the ground lead phase of one of the split pickups as the hot to the switch.

If you've done this, you need to rewire the pickups. Red to the switch, the black and white wires solder/twist together and tape off, only the green is grounded.

Make sure this is what you've done and tie all your grounds back to the volume pot only.

let us know how this goes
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 13, 2011,
#22
I am fairly certain I just discovered the problem. On dimarzio pickups, the red wires are the hot wires, not the black...I'm going to resolder them tomorrow and see how much of a difference that makes. I think it should make all the difference and hopefully the wires will reach otherwise I'll have to do an extension...Also thanks for telling me about grounding all the pots, I'll do that too.

I just have one last quick question. When grounding all of the pots, do I ground them individually to the star ground on the volume pot or to separately onto the volume pot?
Last edited by conor1423 at Dec 14, 2011,
#23
Thank you so much for the help on this. I'll do this work tomorrow after school and hopefully the buzz will be gone. I'll post tomorrow night with how it goes.
#24
http://www.dimarzio.com/sites/default/files/diagrams/3HS_RK_Strat.pdf

That is Dimarzio's diagram for a standard Strat layout with reversed polarity middle pup using the HS noiseless pups. I'd have to see the pickups though. They are suppose to be 4-wire and this diagram calls for grounding all wires except the ones going to the selector, which doesn't seem correct to me unless the wires connecting the coils come pre-soldered and taped off, leaving only the ground wires to solder.
#25
As they are 3 humbuckers I dont think the middle needs to be RW/RP. The SD wiring digram should be right as long as you substitute the colours.

With regards to shielding and ground, as long as everything that is supposed to be grounded has a path to the ring of the output jack everything should be fine. You shouldnt need to do much shielding with 3 humbuckers unless you play in a very high noise area where the controls in the cavity will pick up the noise.
#26
Hmmm.. nobody's said it yet


gotta do it......


'Cause it don't know the words!


Sorry.. just had ta do it!
#27
Ok so I just switched the hot wires. It seems today is one of those days...I burned my thumb pretty badly on the soldering iron when I dropped it because solder got on my hand. Then on top of that, solder dropped into the switch somehow, do now it barely goes to the bridge position, but thankfully just barely does. And now there's a grounding problem because now all the pickups buzz, but when I touch the bridge it significantly decreases. Any ideas?
#28
Ouch! Sounds like youve had a bit of a hard time. Make sure you treat the burn.

If the switch is barely making it to the bridge position and if solder got inside it it's unknown if its shorting any of the internal contacts?

The touching the bridge and reducing the noise is a good sign that at least youve got your basic safety ground working.

But sounds like the switch has now been compromised, by an unknown amount.

But to be honest, if youre having this much trouble, consider just taking it to a tech?

EDIT: BTW did you do - Red pup wire to the switch, the black and white pup wires solder/twist together and tape off, and the green pup wire to ground?
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 14, 2011,
#29
The solder just dripped slightly down the side making the small blade on the side of the selector not slide very well into place, but there's no solder inside of it. I'm thinking I should just ground the pots and hope that doing that can make the difference.
Last edited by conor1423 at Dec 14, 2011,
#30
did you do - Red pup wire to the switch, the black and white pup wires solder/twist together and tape off, and the green pup wire to ground?
#31
Yes I did that today. The red wire is now going to the switch and the black wires are soldered to the white. The green and bare wires are grounded.
#32
Picture is worth a thousand words. This is what I mean by star grounding.

Phear my paint skillz
Attachments:
star grounding.jpg
Last edited by Phoenix V at Dec 14, 2011,
#33
Yea that's what I was thinking but I just wanted to be totally sure before continuing. Thank you so much for your help. I've learned a lot! I'll either ground star ground everything tonight or tomorrow. Hopefully that'll solve the new buzz problem.
#34
Finally some good news, I just did a star ground and discovered two things. I need a new soldering iron before my next project, and star grounding is a miracle worker. It's dead silent now, thank you!!!!
#35
Quote by conor1423
Finally some good news, I just did a star ground and discovered two things. I need a new soldering iron before my next project, and star grounding is a miracle worker. It's dead silent now, thank you!!!!


Well done

Now you know a better method of grounding your electronics and how to wire stuff up better.

Enjoy your DiMarzios!
#36
Consider a Weller P2C iron next time. It runs on butane. It get's hot fast and no cord to drag around. I would always end up burning myself with the electrics because the cord would yank the thing sideways on me when I wasn't expecting it.
Last edited by poppameth at Dec 16, 2011,
#37
Thanks! I will diffenitly be getting some kind of better/stronger soldering iron that the 40W one that I used.