#1
So im probably going to be purchasing some guitars in the near future with floyds loaded on them, and i cant ****ing stand how guitars come with 9s straight from the shop. I know what i need to do to changge the strings on the floyd (there are tonsssssssss of youtube videos that make it pretty damn easy to learn) but if i go an put heavier strings on my guitars, like i plan on doing, what will i have to do? If the bridge is not parallel to the body ill have to either loosen or tighten the screws in the backplate, correct? And as for action, if it doesnt feel right, give a clockwise turn on the truss rod? Willl doing these things help me out? Im sick of overpaying these techy assholes to do shit that i could probably do in my sleep if i just took the time and patience to learn. Please help. Thanks guys.


Quick example: A Guitar comes with 9s equipped, i wanna put 11-50s on.
#2
For 11s you'll need to add probably two springs, and probably have the tension pretty tight. For action you turn the action studs, not the truss rod, that's for the neck.
#3
To change the action at the bridge, you need to turn the pivot studs at the bridge. clockwise to lower the bridge, counter clockwise to raise it. Word of warning: Do not turn the picot studs while the strings are under tension. Make sure the strings are completely slack before you move those studs. If you do that while there is tension, you will wear out the knife edges on the base-plate and ruin your trem.

As far as the truss rod goes, if you plan on putting 11s on, you will probably have to adjust the truss rod a bit so the neck doesn't bow too much. Maybe 1/4 a turn will work. Be VERY careful with that. You can seriously screw up your neck if you turn the truss rod too much.

The thing to remember with a floating trem is string tension = spring tension. That's how it returns to zero point. If the strings/springs aren't balanced right, your guitar will always go sharp or flat when you use the trem. The way to do it is to set the action the level, the way you want it, and then don't touch it. Balance the springs, and then move the saddles to set the intonation.

The best thing to do is have a tech set it up for the strings/tuning you want and then don't mess with it. As long as you use the same strings and tuning, there will be no reason to mess around with the trem at all after that.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#4
You wouldn't have to mess with the truss on a floyd if you're down tuning and/or adjust the spring tension. If you're not down tuning, you could also add another spring.
#5
To change the action at the bridge, you need to turn the pivot studs at the bridge. clockwise to lower the bridge, counter clockwise to raise it. Word of warning: Do not turn the picot studs while the strings are under tension. Make sure the strings are completely slack before you move those studs. If you do that while there is tension, you will wear out the knife edges on the base-plate and ruin your trem.

I dont understand. How can i adjust the pivot screws without the strings being under tension? if they are not under tension, and already strung up on the guitar, then how will i be able to tell if an action adjustment is in order or not? Please be a bit more thorough.
#6
It's fine to adjust them while it's under tension if you have a good quality bridge. The cheap licensed Korean made junk have softer metals and overall lower quality parts in the tremolo unit. It's easy to damage them. An Original Floyd Rose or a Gotoh Floyd though will have hardened steel knife edges and studs. They are designed to handle adjustment under tension.

All that being said, you better be sure what it on your guitars. If they aren't quality parts, then yes back off the tension first. You don't have to take it completely down, but you do want to back it off 3 or 4 turns per string.
#9
Where are you from? In in the USA and I know where to order them from here but that may not help you any. I like the springs that Floyd Upgrades carries. They are basically identical to the short stiff springs that come with the Gotoh Floyds.

You can either use shorter springs for more tension using the same quantity of springs or you can add more springs like you have to increase the tension. Basically you want to balance the string and spring tension to get the bridge parallel to the body when at proper tuning. Short stiff springs will result in a stiffer feeling tremolo, making it harder to dive or flutter but giving you more stability.
#10
Quote by poppameth
It's fine to adjust them while it's under tension if you have a good quality bridge. The cheap licensed Korean made junk have softer metals and overall lower quality parts in the tremolo unit. It's easy to damage them. An Original Floyd Rose or a Gotoh Floyd though will have hardened steel knife edges and studs. They are designed to handle adjustment under tension.

All that being said, you better be sure what it on your guitars. If they aren't quality parts, then yes back off the tension first. You don't have to take it completely down, but you do want to back it off 3 or 4 turns per string.


NO. DO NOT turn those studs under tension. It doesn't really matter the quality of the bridge, its metal rubbing on metal. Sooner or later, those edges will wear out. I've done this to enough trems to know what happens.

Honestly, the real way to do it is to remove the bridge completly and then level out the studs and put it back on. If you do that with your strings attached it is really easy to see how you need to adjust the actions. It's just trial and error. Doing it half-assed by just turning the studs is a great way to screw up your tremolo. And those things ain't cheap either.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#11
Quote by poppameth
It's fine to adjust them while it's under tension if you have a good quality bridge.


NO. IT'S NOT.

NEVER, EVER F**KING DO THIS.

NEVER UNDER ANY F**KING CIRCUMSTANCES MAKE ADJUSTMENTS TO A FLOYD (OFR OR cheap clone) with the strings under tension!!!!!!111!1!1!

F**king Herp Derp, get a clue.
#12
You two are absolutely out of your minds if you think these companies honestly design these bridges so you have to detune them every time you need to make a simple action adjustment. Who would ever want one? Ibanez has said several times in the past that their trems are designed to be adjusted under tension. I'd find that debatable on a couple models but for the most part I believe it. I seriously doubt a Floyd or Gotoh are any lesser quality than the Ibanez trems. I'll be happy to contact Floyd Rose directly as see what they have to say about it.
#13
I have sent mine from standard 9, to standard in an 11, to B standard in an 11, to standard again in a ten, and I have NEVER had to add an extra spring.

a simple thing would be to moved the springs so there is more tension on them, or tighten the screws.


here's a shitty diagram.

____ <--- trem
l l l
l l l <---- springs
----- <----backplate

if your springs look like that, change them to this, and they will have more tension

_____
\ l /
\ l /
-------

if that makes sense.

also, as a general rule of thumb, NEVER ADJUST THE TRUSS ROD, unless there is serious warping going on in the neck. seriously, 99% of the time, just pretend your guitar doesnt have one. to many people go in there screwing around, and screw things up. totally not cool.
#14
Quote by ORCRiST
NO. IT'S NOT.

NEVER, EVER F**KING DO THIS.

NEVER UNDER ANY F**KING CIRCUMSTANCES MAKE ADJUSTMENTS TO A FLOYD (OFR OR cheap clone) with the strings under tension!!!!!!111!1!1!

F**king Herp Derp, get a clue.

Wow, that's a little extreme, isn't it? While it does seem like it would be the dumbest thing a person could do to their Floyd, it really doesn't cause any damage unless you adjust your action all the time.
Quote by stonyman65
NO. DO NOT turn those studs under tension. It doesn't really matter the quality of the bridge, its metal rubbing on metal. Sooner or later, those edges will wear out. I've done this to enough trems to know what happens.

Do you know what's also metal rubbing on metal? Car engines. They seem fine, don't they? What you do to avoid the metal grinding and binding is rub some chapstick (or teflon grease) in the groove on the post so the knife edge gets coated in the stuff while you turn it. There is no harm in being paranoid here, though. But I have adjusted more than ten good Floyds (and Ibanez varieties too) this way and checked the return on a rather good tuner and they've not been a single sent out afterwards. In fact, the lubrication eliminated the problem on the ones that had return issues.
#15
Quote by Pikka Bird
Wow, that's a little extreme, isn't it? While it does seem like it would be the dumbest thing a person could do to their Floyd, it really doesn't cause any damage unless you adjust your action all the time.

Do you know what's also metal rubbing on metal? Car engines. They seem fine, don't they? What you do to avoid the metal grinding and binding is rub some chapstick (or teflon grease) in the groove on the post so the knife edge gets coated in the stuff while you turn it. There is no harm in being paranoid here, though. But I have adjusted more than ten good Floyds (and Ibanez varieties too) this way and checked the return on a rather good tuner and they've not been a single sent out afterwards. In fact, the lubrication eliminated the problem on the ones that had return issues.


I was thinking along the same lines as this as well. Car engines go how many hundreds of thousands of miles with metal on metal friction? Lubrication is the key, and yes chapstick works wonders for trem posts. Every time you use the tremolo you are grinding metal on metal. You are causing less friction by smoothly turning the post than you do with normal rocking of the tremolo.

Edit: Floyd Rose doesn't have many instructions on their website but if you look at the speedloader brochure you'll see that they clearly show setting the action while the strings are at full tension. Nowhere in the manual do they recommend detuning or removing the bridge first. Also in the Technical section they state that the Licensed bridges are more prone to knife edge and post wear than the German model.
Last edited by poppameth at Dec 13, 2011,