#1
Okay I was relearning to play a song because I'm not satisfied with what I'm doing due to sloppy playing and being impatient. So I relearn it by playing it slowly and hitting all the right notes. But my arm between my elbow and shoulder is having some strain.

Do you guys know how to get rid of it?
#4
I've been playing for a year and a half. it doesn't happen to me a few months ago but now it does...
#5
I feel when your right arm is really tense this tends to happen. The trick is to relax. Especially if you are really focusing on hitting the right notes and you may be picking too hard. Try to take your arm off your guitar if your sitting down and just let it 'float' while you play (you know what I mean). Also, just do some stretches before, loosen up them muscles.
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Deluxe
ESP LTD EX-360
Peavey VYPYR 30W

"There's nothing constant in the universe.
All ebb and flow, and every shape that's born,
bears in it's womb, the seeds of change".
#6
when playing guitar sitting down, is it standard that we have to "float" our arm?
#7
lol no it is not and you can do whatever feels right, but it seems to take the strain off of that part of the arm. Just a good way to help ease that pain and take the strain away.
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Deluxe
ESP LTD EX-360
Peavey VYPYR 30W

"There's nothing constant in the universe.
All ebb and flow, and every shape that's born,
bears in it's womb, the seeds of change".
#8
Floating the picking arm/hand is a highly debatable topic, with the ultimate endpoint being that it really does help you to maximize the efficiency of your picking motions with the least amount of strain/fatigue... BUT, usually this kind of detailed nit-picking is, in my opinion, a road that a guitar player will most likely WANT to meet most naturally later on down the road in terms of their development, especially if they are striving for technical prowess.

I, however, do not think it matters as greatly as others believe when it comes to the more mid-tempo, mildly technical player. Of course, like I said, it WILL help... but also realize that it is at first significantly more difficult than resting the picking forearm above the bridge on the guitar's body. You won't be comfortable with it for a long time, and that's the thing, it takes diligence and patience with your practice in order to work. You gotta ask yourself, are you THAT serious of a player? Cause in the long-run this is something you can always change, but then again one can argue that breaking a habit is harder than making one.

Now, to the point of the thread. I'd suggest just not flexing while you're playing, as I think that this is what is most likely your problem. It's sounds cliche, but I agree with the other poster that you should just relax. In my personal opinion, the tone and "power" of the notes derive more from the fretted fingers and picking accents than the actual force of the pick being driven on the string. You might just be pumped and excited when you play, well just take a step back and relax if that's the case. Generally when its you're bicep/tricep that hurts, that means you're really tensed and are flexing while playing.

Do you notice that you might be flexing while playing?
#9
yeah i do notice. anyways so how to relax while playing in a floating position?

Btw as for the guitar habits, I can overcome them even though it took some time I can get over it. There's one time where I clench my picking hand to pick when i first started then later I "open" my fingers. Now I'm changing back to clenching but with slight tweaks

I'm playing guitar as a hobby and playing some jamming session with friends for fun.
Last edited by PUNKSTER93 at Dec 11, 2011,