#1
...do you always want to get a professional setup?

How much on average is a setup?
#2
You do but the guitar should be decent enough that even without it would still be amazing.
Quote by Tyson2011
when in doubt, adjust the truss rod.

Sfedf the First ...
or should it be the insane?
#3
When I buy a guitar I do my own setup.

That way, I save like $45 and MY guitar is setup the way I like it.

Buy a trussrod tool, and a screwdriver and learn to do it yourself. You'll save a decent amount of $.
Gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio Cherry Sunburst w/ Alnico Pro II
-1960 Yamaha Orange Sticker Acoustic
-Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401
-Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
-Blackstar HT-5RH
Last edited by IdntNedUrCvlWar at Dec 11, 2011,
#5
I usually get a professional setup when I first buy the guitar so I can get everything setup the way I like it. After that, I'll just perform routine maintenance on it ever three months or so to make sure the neck relief and intonation is in check and the action is still at the same spot.

It costs me about $10 total for the professional setup.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#6
If you buy new they should set it up for free.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#7
^+1 I never have bought new, but would THINK that was part of the deal. I have paid about $25-35 for setups before.
Jackson DK2 with SD Super Distortion bridge PU
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Top
Dean ExoticGlass
Takamine Jasmine
Line 6 Spider 3 150-watts!!!
#8
I set my guitars up myself. No shop or tech has ever managed to set up a guitar how I like it so I stopped going to them and learnt to do it all myself. It doesn't matter how experienced or professional someone is, they don't have your hands and they can never really know exactly how you like your guitars to feel and sound.
#9
Quote by IdntNedUrCvlWar
When I buy a guitar I do my own setup.

That way, I save like $45 and MY guitar is setup the way I like it.

Buy a trussrod tool, and a screwdriver and learn to do it yourself. You'll save a decent amount of $.

+1
#10
Yes the guitar should all ways be professionally set up. Thats why I do it myself. Setups are easy which is why it surprised that the local luthier here is soooooo horrible at it. I had a guy bring me a guitar done by the luthier here and it was so bad I actually was going to have to replace the nut to fix what he screwed up. And he had the vintage style trem screws all the way down so the bridge sat all the way up making the action 3x higher than it needed to be and he shimmed the neck... I took off the shim and put the trem all the way down and blocked it. Ended up with a decent action and near perfect intonation.
#11
Depends, I can set up guitars on my own but if it is a $1000+ expensive guitar, I'd rather a professional do the job
???
#12
I do everything but fret work... Crowning and replacing... just don't have the tools, and don't need to buy them..

a good quality tuner helps make setting intonation easy, truss rod adjustments aren't scary, just go slow...

Read as much as you can, and get a few tools, and professional set up costs will be a thing of the past..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#13
Yeah, once the set of strings it comes with are rusted to hell. No point wasting some perfectly decent strings now is there

The guy near me does it for around £40, although I've usually got him replacing parts as well so not sure what a straight set-up would be.
#14
Quote by IdntNedUrCvlWar
When I buy a guitar I do my own setup.

That way, I save like $45 and MY guitar is setup the way I like it.

Buy a trussrod tool, and a screwdriver and learn to do it yourself. You'll save a decent amount of $.

Don't forget the tuner that cost 300 dollars as well at a level and an assortment of files for your frets, and a tool to check the wires in your body, as well as an accurate ruler that can do millimeters perfectly to measure string height as well. And if you need better parts or something soldiered better, get a soldier gun.


UMMM. I go to a professional. I can set up guitars on my own, and I do a great, job, but there's some things a professional tech can do better, just make sure you go to a professional tech that works with guitars and not a retarded handy man at a small shop.

If the guitar is under 500, I would feel fine doing it myself because I don't think I would ever play it live. But even though I can do a good job myself, the tools available to me are much different and not specialized for guitar.

IDK how much it is, I think it's 60 bucks or so, but well worth it, I might need to adjust the neck a little since it's been about 8 months and there is a little too much relief, but even now it plays great.


These people who do it themselves without the proper equipment probably suck at it or have guitars that aren't worth the cost of setting up. Every guitar you buy should already have an allen wrench to adjust the truss rod, but if you don't know what your doing (and no, reading an article online, does not make you proficient) then take it somewhere else.


edit:make sure you know exactly how you want it set up and tell them when you get there
Last edited by kai29 at Dec 11, 2011,
#15
I'd go with the idea of learning how to do your own. Nobody will ever set it up exactly the way you like most. Once you learn how, it will always be prefect to your taste. And the cost of the tools and complexity of them is about as cheap and simple as it gets. Price range for a multi-tool is from $15.00 to $50.00 USD. Like these...




The blue one is the cheapy and can be had from GC. Brand specific tools like the Ibanez Prestige tool pictured are a bit more expensive but they serve the purpocse a bit better. There is/are thread(s) on how to do it right here on the website.
#16
Quote by kai29



These people who do it themselves without the proper equipment probably suck at it or have guitars that aren't worth the cost of setting up. Every guitar you buy should already have an allen wrench to adjust the truss rod, but if you don't know what your doing (and no, reading an article online, does not make you proficient) then take it somewhere else.



Allen keys... Yeah the ones bought at Harbor Freight are completely different and are not suitable for working on guitars. /sarcasm

I do it myself and I am good at it, and I am not speaking for myself either. I have had my friends take there gear to techs after I have worked on them to have pickups installed *i dont know why when I also offer that service* and the techs all ways tell them that my setups are done very well. Just not too long ago I worked on a $1000 acoustic and the guy loved it when I was done, he even has his friends coming to me now for setups instead of going to the local shops. Also no reading an artical does not make you proficient but if you read them you will at least know what to do. After that its just practice and with enough practice you will get good enough that you will never have to take your guitar to a shop to get a setup again unless you want fretwork or repairs done.


*soon I will be offering fretwork done $20 cheaper than the local luthier who I explained does horrible setups* But before I do that I want to practice a lot more.
#17
Quote by Darkdevil725
Allen keys... Yeah the ones bought at Harbor Freight are completely different and are not suitable for working on guitars. /sarcasm

I do it myself and I am good at it, and I am not speaking for myself either. I have had my friends take there gear to techs after I have worked on them to have pickups installed *i dont know why when I also offer that service* and the techs all ways tell them that my setups are done very well. Just not too long ago I worked on a $1000 acoustic and the guy loved it when I was done, he even has his friends coming to me now for setups instead of going to the local shops. Also no reading an artical does not make you proficient but if you read them you will at least know what to do. After that its just practice and with enough practice you will get good enough that you will never have to take your guitar to a shop to get a setup again unless you want fretwork or repairs done.


*soon I will be offering fretwork done $20 cheaper than the local luthier who I explained does horrible setups* But before I do that I want to practice a lot more.



Yeah because an allen wrench is the only tool used by guitar techs /sarcasm

I sincerely doubt you can set up intonation on your tuner as well at a Pro guitar tech can on a Peterson Strobe Center or an AutoStrobe tuner

And I bet you have a professional fret presser and do you have fretboard radius sanding blocks to make sure you are getting the proper radius?
What about a fingerboard iron to heat the glue when removing frets so you don't damage the fretboard?

Magnet polarity testers, digital calipers...????


And you compare your work to Professionals? Your work may be on par or slightly better than self professed luthiers (hobbyists) but I doubt your set up is anywhere near acceptable to a professional guitar tech. If the way you set up guitars is good for you, that's fine, but to insist that OP practices on a new guitar (referring to the original question) is absurd.

Take it to a professional- make sure it's a professional.
#18
Quote by kai29
Yeah because an allen wrench is the only tool used by guitar techs /sarcasm

I sincerely doubt you can set up intonation on your tuner as well at a Pro guitar tech can on a Peterson Strobe Center or an AutoStrobe tuner

And I bet you have a professional fret presser and do you have fretboard radius sanding blocks to make sure you are getting the proper radius?
What about a fingerboard iron to heat the glue when removing frets so you don't damage the fretboard?

Magnet polarity testers, digital calipers...????


And you compare your work to Professionals? Your work may be on par or slightly better than self professed luthiers (hobbyists) but I doubt your set up is anywhere near acceptable to a professional guitar tech. If the way you set up guitars is good for you, that's fine, but to insist that OP practices on a new guitar (referring to the original question) is absurd.

Take it to a professional- make sure it's a professional.


No I dont have a fret presser and I do not have a radius sanding block and so far I have no issues at all maintaining the radius without one. I said I was still practicing a lot before getting deep into fretwork. Though those are on my list of things to buy soon. I never claimed I currently do it for anyone but myself. And yes I have calipers and testers, and fingerboard iron? Yes, its called a soldering iron with a flat tip and for pulling frets I have clipper that have had the ends ground flat so they can get under frets.


And why not practice on a new guitar, unless he is a complete imbecile like you think he is there is no real damage he can do that cant be fixed with more practice at setups as long as he reads some guides.

My competition here is mainly Deatherage Music Company. He beats me hands down at fretwork and repairs which is why I still do not offer that service but without a doupt I do better setups than he does which is why I am getting his customers now. I am why he now charges $16 instead of $30 like he use to for setups. All though I am sure it helps that I am nice to my customers and don't treat them like idiots.

Also you misunderstood me. I did not say I was better than professionals I just said I am better than the techs at the shops in town. Sure a real pro is going to be able to get a bit better intonation than I am unlike me a real pro has those $200 tuners. If there was a real pro in town I would have trouble but for the moment I am still the best here for setups.

I think it is more important for a player to learn how to do a good setup than it is to have to take it to a tech to do it for $30 - $40. Its a waste of money.
#19
I've always wanted to learn. A friend of mine adjusts my guitars for 10 bucks, but he refuses to teach anyone how to do it, as he is one of the few people who does it right in my area and he is afraid to lose his job
Fender Jaguar -> Polytune -> Diamond Compressor -> Timmy -> OCD -> Big Muff -> Line 6 M9 -> Sonomatic Cheddar -> Spark boost -> Fender BDRI
#20
Quote by Svennz
I've always wanted to learn. A friend of mine adjusts my guitars for 10 bucks, but he refuses to teach anyone how to do it, as he is one of the few people who does it right in my area and he is afraid to lose his job

lol I can understand that. I am the same way. I only ever taught one of my friends.
#21
i dont know if this is true about your GC's but at mine they all get set up if they are selling for >$1000. i am sure if you are friendly to your salesman he would do it free.

i set up my guitars. i really wouldn't like anybody to do it. i am not going to claim i am better than "all" or "most" techs or a pros or anything like that, but i do a fine job and am better than quite a few. and i get better as i do it.

i setup like at least three guitars a week it seems. some i am flipping so i set it up as they always sell better after you have cleaned and set them up.

i rotate between three and four guitars every week or so. i have like 20 or so guitars, so when i get a feeling like i want to mess around something else. i set it up then play it for a little while, and go take one of the others and put it in its case/on the wall, etc.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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#22
Quote by kai29
Yeah because an allen wrench is the only tool used by guitar techs /sarcasm

I sincerely doubt you can set up intonation on your tuner as well at a Pro guitar tech can on a Peterson Strobe Center or an AutoStrobe tuner

And I bet you have a professional fret presser and do you have fretboard radius sanding blocks to make sure you are getting the proper radius?
What about a fingerboard iron to heat the glue when removing frets so you don't damage the fretboard?

Magnet polarity testers, digital calipers...????


And you compare your work to Professionals? Your work may be on par or slightly better than self professed luthiers (hobbyists) but I doubt your set up is anywhere near acceptable to a professional guitar tech. If the way you set up guitars is good for you, that's fine, but to insist that OP practices on a new guitar (referring to the original question) is absurd.

Take it to a professional- make sure it's a professional.



Id be willing to bet that for most of us, such a professional could be thousands of miles away. I live in upstate ny, and let me tell you, I think NYC is the closest place where such professionals are readily available. there are a few real luthiers up here in the mountains, but aside from them, your lucky if your tech is using a name brand tuner and has the tool to just do a grind and polish.

where I live, and im sure where others live as well, sometimes a job one does themselves can in fact be much much better, because there arent too many pros around with the real tools to do the trade well. many shops dont even have tube testers.

and the ones that do exist would charge hundreds of dollars if you actually intended them to use said tools for any job.

so idk where you live, but I envy you if you can get a real good setup involving some level of fret leveling, near exact intonation, and everything else for under two or three hundred... for the most part the shops here plug it into a tuner, intonate, set action, adjust the truss rod, and tune it. you pay as much as $30-$45 for a regular guitar and $80-$100+ for a floyd guitar. its why I said **** "professional" setups for awhile. if I could get it done well and reasonably that would be another story.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#23
Quote by spiroth10


so idk where you live, but I envy you if you can get a real good setup involving some level of fret leveling, near exact intonation, and everything else for under two or three hundred... for the most part the shops here plug it into a tuner, intonate, set action, adjust the truss rod, and tune it. you pay as much as $30-$45 for a regular guitar and $80-$100+ for a floyd guitar. its why I said **** "professional" setups for awhile. if I could get it done well and reasonably that would be another story.


Yeah the shops here kind of suck. There use to be a shop here in town called JJ's Guitars and Boards that did amazing setups including fret leveling for just under $150 *if you had a bound neck* but they are not around anymore. $200 if it was a refret job. I loved that place. The owner is at fault for it though, he was a awesome guy but he tried increase his business by moving to a spot in the mall. But the spot he chose was down a wing of the mall no one ever goes to and it was more expensive and smaller than the shop he started with that was just off the side of one of the busiest streets in town.

To top it off he changed the stores phone number and never updated the address so most guitarist in town didnt even know it existed anymore. Eventually it died cause he was lucky to sell one to two guitars a week even though he had the best prices in town.
Last edited by Darkdevil725 at Dec 12, 2011,
#24
Quote by spiroth10
Id be willing to bet that for most of us, such a professional could be thousands of miles away. I live in upstate ny, and let me tell you, I think NYC is the closest place where such professionals are readily available. there are a few real luthiers up here in the mountains, but aside from them, your lucky if your tech is using a name brand tuner and has the tool to just do a grind and polish.

where I live, and im sure where others live as well, sometimes a job one does themselves can in fact be much much better, because there arent too many pros around with the real tools to do the trade well. many shops dont even have tube testers.

and the ones that do exist would charge hundreds of dollars if you actually intended them to use said tools for any job.

so idk where you live, but I envy you if you can get a real good setup involving some level of fret leveling, near exact intonation, and everything else for under two or three hundred... for the most part the shops here plug it into a tuner, intonate, set action, adjust the truss rod, and tune it. you pay as much as $30-$45 for a regular guitar and $80-$100+ for a floyd guitar. its why I said **** "professional" setups for awhile. if I could get it done well and reasonably that would be another story.


we have our fare share of bad ones here. I go about 15 miles from here (same distance as the nearest guitar center) to a local shop that's been here for, I think over 50 years, It's the last private owned company that can compete with guitar center here, and it has just about every other instrument as well.

The only other place I've found I can get a good set up is at guitar center on the days when their guitar tech is there (i think it's wednesday for my nearest store).


Also to the guy above, yes guitar center will set up a guitar if you buy it there, but you have to be careful because you might get a stupid twat of a salesman that does it himself and keeps your licensed allen wrench (and that's all he'll do, is adjust the truss rod and throw your intonation out the crapper). Unless your actually paying for the set up at guitar center, you're not going to get a good job. Factories already set up the guitar stock. Of course conditions are different and there may be slight adjustments that need to be made, but unless you can find a real pro, then all you'll need to do is a small truss rod adjustment, maybe quarter turn at most and a slight intonation fix afterward. And if you feel comfortable with the strings on, you can move the bridge down.

I move the bridge down when I change to new strings and bring it up after the strings tension is up to where it should be when I fix my action. same thing with intonation, because of the amount of tension and pressure, you will need to adjust it an average of 4 times before you'll no longer need to adjust if after every string change to get the best intonation. That's for fixed bridges.
Last edited by kai29 at Dec 12, 2011,
#25
*Sigh*


Guess I'm not cool and have a lack of knowledge and/or decent instruments to give my opinion in an online forum.



P.S

Lol @ $300 tuner comment.

The first and only time I watched my tech set up my Les Paul on the spot; never did he use this fancy equipment you talk of. Yeah I know its out there and he had it, but its not necessary setup a guitar either.

An allen key, small flathead screw driver, and a small file is all that is needed to setup a guitar.

In my experience, when I have bought an expensive instrument, I haven't had to have frets filed down and then have a computer plek my intonation. Any instrument worth having a setup done, has usually had all of that work done at the factory while it was being made

Quick advice:

-Have a tech set up your guitar.
-Take it home and play it. Look for where you want to see improvement in playability.
-Read up about setting up guitars.
-If your guitar didn't come with an allen key for your truss rod, go to a hardware store and buyone like the one some user previously posted.
-Don't make massive changesbut rather small ones until you see the changes that happen and adjust from there until you're satisfied.

I understand people like having they're guitars set up by a pro's because they don't want to frig up anything and that's totally fine.

I'm just saying if you learn how to and you feel comfortable doing it, you're really opening up more doors for yourself. You won't have to spend money nor will you have to wait for the shop to finish your guitar.

That's what I did and I've been setting my own guitar up for quite a while now and I've never looked back on not taking my instruments into the shop. I really wouldn't be suprised if I've saved $1000+.

It's just a whole lot easier.

Quote by kai29
Don't forget the tuner that cost 300 dollars as well at a level and an assortment of files for your frets, and a tool to check the wires in your body, as well as an accurate ruler that can do millimeters perfectly to measure string height as well. And if you need better parts or something soldiered better, get a soldier gun.



Oh you mean a Multi-meter tool and a depth gauge (which can measure up to 1/64th of an inch by the way)?

The DVOM is only $30 and the depth gauge is maybe $3 at an automotive store.

I guess I wouldn't know anyways, I'm just an ASE certified mechanic and know nothing about checking electrical points. Not really sure why you would be in the electric panel of a guitar when you're only setting up intonation and such anyways.

Sorry for the novel, but some things just need to be explained to people who clearly have no clue or insight on what really setting up a guitar is.
Gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio Cherry Sunburst w/ Alnico Pro II
-1960 Yamaha Orange Sticker Acoustic
-Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401
-Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
-Blackstar HT-5RH
Last edited by IdntNedUrCvlWar at Dec 12, 2011,
#26
Fixing a guitar with simple tools is like fixing a car with simple tools, only easier. You can get the job done but its slower and more work with simpler tools. Conceptually, you can build a guitar from scratch, including cutting down a tree, with just a jackknife. Well, perhaps a dozen knives, cuz they will wear out before you finish. The point I'm trying to make is that there are many things that can be done without special tools.
#27
I set up and test between 40 and 50 guitars a day, some cost more then one of your cars. A couple of allen wrenches, depth gauge for the string height a tuner that does´nt cost anywhere near 300 peanuts and 2 screwdrivers. it´s a guitar not the Feckin space shuttle. If you pay someone to do it, it´s your own damned fault. Every person that comes to me for a set up I only charge them $10 plus strings if needed and I show them how to do it.
Last edited by sstony at Dec 14, 2011,
#28
WOW

Fret presses, Files, heatguns oh my!!!

I thought this was a thread about guitar SET UP... not building or restoration...

Let me just say this... If I take my Guitar in to have it SET UP, and the guy comes close to my guitar with ANYTHING hot enough to melt the glue holding my frets to the fret board, I'm gonna smack him hard!!!!!
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#29
I paid for the setup when I bought my guitar but plan to do all future adjustments myself. I still need to get a few more tools.
#30
Quote by 4ofus
I paid for the setup when I bought my guitar but plan to do all future adjustments myself. I still need to get a few more tools.



Goodluck man, its really not hard at all and you'll learn quite fast.

Tools to set up a guitar won't cost you more then $25
Gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio Cherry Sunburst w/ Alnico Pro II
-1960 Yamaha Orange Sticker Acoustic
-Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401
-Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
-Blackstar HT-5RH
#31
there are a few really good books out there ( http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Player-Repair-Guide-3rd/dp/0879309210/ref=pd_sim_b_5/182-9430398-2553820 ) that will give you the basics.

I generally do my own setup but if it gets into anything a little more advanced i take it to the shop. I am very comfortable with cleaning, swapping out electronics or soldering in new parts but when it comes to fret work or truss rod stuff i leave it alone and take it to a shop. If you study about it and learn all you can now you will save a lot of money and avoid the dreaded "what did that guy do to my guitar" issues later.
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#32
tech work, like buying your first guitar, and even playing it having never played before, will seem daunting, you will never get it right, and you will second guess every decision you make. Like buying asking for opinion on it from your friends will confuse matters as everyone is a little different, and an internet forum will be even worse as the people here wont be able to tell you what they think is going to be best for you not knowing you.

Like playing if you can watch someone do their guitar, do it. then if you feel confident try it yourself, basically, learn how to do it, start slowly, and get it right (something which there isn't really a wrong to its all still about preference) intonation needs to be right but that's like tuning, if its wrong it will just sound wrong, action is all about the player, some like it as tight as the virgin mary, some like it was wide open as mary magdalane. In time you may be competent to set up "50 in a day" like previously said in the thread, but for now just work on what works for you. try different things.
#33
Quote by kai29

Also to the guy above, yes guitar center will set up a guitar if you buy it there, but you have to be careful because you might get a stupid twat of a salesman that does it himself and keeps your licensed allen wrench (and that's all he'll do, is adjust the truss rod and throw your intonation out the crapper). Unless your actually paying for the set up at guitar center, you're not going to get a good job. Factories already set up the guitar stock. Of course conditions are different and there may be slight adjustments that need to be made, but unless you can find a real pro, then all you'll need to do is a small truss rod adjustment, maybe quarter turn at most and a slight intonation fix afterward. And if you feel comfortable with the strings on, you can move the bridge down.

I move the bridge down when I change to new strings and bring it up after the strings tension is up to where it should be when I fix my action. same thing with intonation, because of the amount of tension and pressure, you will need to adjust it an average of 4 times before you'll no longer need to adjust if after every string change to get the best intonation. That's for fixed bridges.


first off if you would have read my post, i said that i wouildn't let them. i do them myself.

the topic of this thread appeared to me as the OP wanted to know if a new guitar bought from a shop should get a setup.

i stated that my GC does on >$1000 guitars.

if that second paragraph is directed towards me, it was a waste of your time to type that out.

i said earlier in this thread that i do my own work, and do it quite often, and i do a good job. when a friend picks up a guitar, the usually comment that it plays well. i setup my friends guitars too. a six pack of Gunniess does it for me.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#34
Quote by IdntNedUrCvlWar

Buy a trussrod tool


You mean an allen wrench? They have alot more uses than trussrods you know.
#35
I setup my own guitars until I got a Floyd. That kind of intimidated me for couple months until the tech I go to showed me how simple it was. Now I pretty much do everything myself.