#1
Hello all! I've been doing alot of eartraining using the Earmaster program and I see great progress. But I can't seem to sing the interval of a major 7th. I'm trying to recall the song take on me, but I really can't get the right note for the interval.

Also, I can hear and recognize the interval of a major 7th. I just can't sing it when hearing a note and I'm trying to sing the interval.

Do you have any good ways of practicing this or is it just to keep trying until you get it?
Last edited by simoon321 at Dec 12, 2011,
#3
+1. Or try Somewhere Over The Rainbow which goes Root - Octave - down a b2 to the major 7th.

Some - Where - O
#4
Quote by Freepower
Personally I can't sing for shit, so take this with a grain of salt - perhaps try singing octave-major seven-root-major seven?

Would that make it easier to pitch and feel?


Maybe you should practice some ear training then?

I have also tried to go up to an octave and then down to major seventh, but it's still hard for me. And I would really want to be able to sing the interval directly.
#5
Quote by mdc
+1. Or try Somewhere Over The Rainbow which goes Root - Octave - down a b2 to the major 7th.

Some - Where - O


Mdc...It seems like you are stalking my posts
#6
Quote by mdc
+1. Or try Somewhere Over The Rainbow which goes Root - Octave - down a b2 to the major 7th.

Some - Where - O


Still got a hard time with that, but I'm going to have some more practice with it and hopefully I will get it. There are not that many songs with major 7th interval to relate to and it's a bit of "out of tune" sounding, which makes it much harder
#7
try doing the going to the octave and back to the seventh...
but you can also try and think of it as the leading tone, that usually works for me... singing it wanting to resolve on the octave
#8
Quote by simoon321
Still got a hard time with that, but I'm going to have some more practice with it and hopefully I will get it. There are not that many songs with major 7th interval to relate to and it's a bit of "out of tune" sounding, which makes it much harder

Try gliding between the two intervals. So your voice swoops up to the major 7th and vice versa.

There's a classical term for it, but I don't know what it's called.

Also, the Star Trek theme.
#9
^
Glissando?

The trick with ear training and singing is that, for the harder intervals, you have to listen to where the note wants to go. Sing C, then up to B. It'll want to go to C. That's how you learn to sing a M7.

The hard part at that point is differentiating a tritone and a M7. But if you're ear is relatively decent you can easily hear the difference.
#10
Quote by simoon321
Maybe you should practice some ear training then?


Sure, just seemed like the logical way to about it. My ears aren't great but I do work on em - it's my singing that's terrible.
#11
play the notes on the guitar at the same time?
When my wife took singing lessons, they used a piano all the time to reference notes.
#12
Thanks for some great advice! Im going to try and think about it in the terms of going up to the octave. I'm also trying to get the interval quality sound into my head by playing som intervals on piano and guitar.

Thanks!
#15
chorus from a-ha - take on me. M7 between "take"and "on" in the first line of the chorus.

don't forget to try playing M7s on an instrument and matching the pitches.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
Quote by simoon321
Hello all! I've been doing alot of eartraining using the Earmaster program and I see great progress. But I can't seem to sing the interval of a major 7th. I'm trying to recall the song take on me, but I really can't get the right note for the interval.

Also, I can hear and recognize the interval of a major 7th. I just can't sing it when hearing a note and I'm trying to sing the interval.

Do you have any good ways of practicing this or is it just to keep trying until you get it?


First, recognize that 7ths are hard. They are actually quite rare melodically because many singers have a hard time hitting them accurately (it's a combination of the musical distance and the relative amount of dissonance).

My reference for Major 7ths ascending is the theme from Superman. (1-1-1-7-5, 1-1-1-7-5, 1-1-1-7-6-7-8).
#17
After a year of voice lessons my best advice is that it feels almost like singing the octave. Practice alot especially with a well tuned instrument for reference
#18
Force you're ear not to "settle". In other words, try this:

Pick a note for reference, say A, 5th fret low E. Now sing a major 7 interval, double check it by playing the G sharp on the 6th fret D string.

Repeat the same process one semitone higher. Go all the way up to however high. The descend back down.

That's the lateral way (along the neck). You could try it vertically as well (strings 6 & 4, 5 & 3, 4 & 2, 3 & 1).

Also can you try singing the chord tones of a maj7 chord.... in any order. R 5 7 3.

Then apply that to the above.
#19
Quote by mdc


Also can you try singing the chord tones of a maj7 chord.... in any order. R 5 7 3.


+1

i did this alot in my lessons
#20
Whats up ma brothas? Just wanted to tell you that this ear training of mine is going flawlessly. Im starting to get the hang of the major 7th and what I tend to do is trying to get the feel of the interval wanting to go further, to the octave. I practiced this with the Earmaster program but also kept playing the interval on guitar/piano and tried to sing the interval to get the feel of it. That's the way I worked with it so I hope that may help others that strugle with this or another interval.

Take care!

Simon