#1
I have always wanted to know, when a real studio records drums, how much bleed through is there on each track? For instance I have really loud cymbal bleed through on my snare track (which was recorded as usual with a 57). Its really annoying and I'm not sure of a good way to get rid of it. Is that normal? Is there a good way to get rid of it? I've tried using a noise gate but that eliminates a little of the snare too. I've also tried EQ but that doesn't really work. In the future I think I might try something I saw on a BTBAM studio update....they had a piece of foam around the snare mic to try and lessen the bleed through.

I'm also having a little bit of trouble making my snare track a little more fatter and stand out more. With the equipment I have, we were only able to have 1 snare track so I only have snare top.
#2
We only have the drum mics we use when we play live which is the Shure Drum Mic set so all I did was clip it on the side and point it at the snare. The back end was facing the hi hat most likely
#3
If there is a ridiculous amount of bleed then it will be your mic placement/room. Unless you are using HIGHLY directional mic's there will always be bleed though.

EDIT: As for the snare sound itself you should try different mic positions. I've never really seen the need for a bottom mic. If you try moving the mic to the side of the snare you'll get a nice mix of both the top and bottom
Last edited by vjferrara at Dec 12, 2011,
#4
Quote by vjferrara
If there is a ridiculous amount of bleed then it will be your mic placement/room. Unless you are using HIGHLY directional mic's there will always be bleed though.


We recorded in a cafe that we play at sometimes. The cafe is pretty big and has a higher ceiling. Pretty spacious.
#5
It's all about where you put the microphones. Try moving the snare mic around a bit. Different angles, different positions, etc. There will be some bleed from the cymbals, its just a matter of how much.
Last edited by chaosmoon at Dec 12, 2011,
#6
Quote by chaosmoon
It's all about where you put the microphones. Try moving the snare mic around a bit. Different angles, different positions, etc. The will be some bleed from the cymbals, its just a matter of how much.

This, pretty much.

You may also want to try raising the cymbals. If the kit is really tight and the cymbals are just above the drums, then you're going to get significantly more bleed.
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#7
Cymbals and hats bleed into everything. It's just a fact of life. You can f**k around with gating tracks and such, but I find that, at the end of the day, it doesn't make much difference, and sometimes works against you.

Consider... you will NEVER, in the real world, hear a drum kit played in a room where each drum has its own isolated sonic space. Never. So why knock yourself out trying to create that?

CT
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