#1
So I've recently taken the dive into the world of music theory, and so far it's not too awfully hard to understand.

One thing I'd like to clarify: When reading sheet music, how do I know if the musician is playing an F on.. say their E or A string? Is there a method to determining this? I've just been working it out by ear, which is working quite well.

Thanks
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#2
As long as it's the same note and not an octave above or below, it doesn't matter. Well, as far as I know.
#3
Quote by akarith
So I've recently taken the dive into the world of music theory, and so far it's not too awfully hard to understand.

One thing I'd like to clarify: When reading sheet music, how do I know if the musician is playing an F on.. say their E or A string? Is there a method to determining this? I've just been working it out by ear, which is working quite well.

Thanks

Do you know where middle C is on the staff and on the guitar? Also, ledger lines?

In short, an F on the low E string will be below middle C, and on the A string it'll be above.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 12, 2011,
#4
Quote by akarith
So I've recently taken the dive into the world of music theory, and so far it's not too awfully hard to understand.

One thing I'd like to clarify: When reading sheet music, how do I know if the musician is playing an F on.. say their E or A string? Is there a method to determining this? I've just been working it out by ear, which is working quite well.


There is no way to know which of the same-pitch-same-octave notes are being played from reading music. So, for example, am I playing the B on the seventh fret of the E string or the 2nd fret of the a-string? No way to know from reading the music.

With experience, this because obvious most of the time as you learn how to go from reading the music, to hearing it in your head, to playing it. (Remember that sightreading isn't, really, about "read the note, think the note name, find the note on the fretboard." The goal is to get to a place where it's "read the music, think the music, play the music.")
#5
Timbre will be different across the strings.

I wouldn't be surprised that the rolled of tone in jazz guitar is to even out this timbre, in that it doesn't matter where you play the note as it would be almost similar in tone.

I mean Miles Davis on trumpet or Thelonious monk on piano don't have a "mellow" timbre. So I don't really get the rolled of tone in jazz.

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#6
Sometimes you will see a roman numeral with a bracket over all notes to be played on that string. There is also sul (string name) with a bracket. I've very occasionally seen corda in place of sul.

This would be in scores that have been edited by a player to show how they play it. Often times even the finger to be used is shown above the notes.
Last edited by Vlasco at Dec 12, 2011,
#7
Quote by akarith
how do I know if the musician is playing an F on.. say their E or A string?


Generally you don't, this is determined by things like accessibility and context eg. phrasing, position playing, scale pattern etc.
Last edited by demon.guitarist at Dec 12, 2011,
#8
Middle C? As in the 8th fret on E? And would that same middle C be the C between the second and third bar (from the bottom) on the bass clef?
Smoke 'em 'til ya die.
#9
On the bass clef it'll be one ledger line above the staff. If you look at a grand staff you'll see how the two are linked.

To answer your question again, an F on the low E string (1st fret) will be the 3rd ledger line below the treble clef staff. Which is the same line that runs through the F clef on the bass staff.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 12, 2011,
#10
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Timbre will be different across the strings.

I wouldn't be surprised that the rolled of tone in jazz guitar is to even out this timbre, in that it doesn't matter where you play the note as it would be almost similar in tone.

I mean Miles Davis on trumpet or Thelonious monk on piano don't have a "mellow" timbre. So I don't really get the rolled of tone in jazz.

Well jazz guitar is more about string noise anyway when you're comping, i.e Freddy Green. And yes before anyone gets defensive about their instrument, jazz is a broad genre.

On topic, a low F will be 3 ledger lines down below the stave on treble, or 2nd line from the top of bass clef.
#12
On a Strat the virtual 24th fret is over the neck pick up. Can get the harmonic there, but of course it's not strictly the same.
#13
If you're reading sheet music that's meant to be played on guitar, there will be position markings that indicate what fret your hand should be resting at. Classical guitar tends to make you stay in one position on the neck as long as possible without running into difficulties, so there will really only be one place where you'll want to play a particular note at any particular time. If the position isn't indicated with roman numerals, you can assume you're in open position. There are also instances where the string number for a note will be indicated with a number within a circle, such as often happens when you play a B note in open position on the 4th fret of the 3rd string instead of with an open 2nd string.

So basically, stick to the position of the neck you're currently on unless told to move by another position indicator or a "string in a ring."
#14
Some music notates it, most does not. Dont fret though. Its sort of an art in itself and it will become clearer the more you read music

Basically, my best advice for now is take time to consider multiple fingering solutions whenever you find yourself playing a difficult passage and pick the easiest one always (eventually you wont always want the easiest one, but by the time your ready for that, youll know)