#1
i'm building a telecaster, and all the routing and body work is done, so i just need to work on the electronics now. i've been looking at .047 uf caps, and some have voltages of 200v, 320, 400, and 600 volts. is there a specific one i should get? does it make much of a difference?

if it helps, i was going to use cloth wire like in the old fenders.


edit: also, how do i do 50's wiring on a telecaster?


i have the seymour duncan diagram (using a hotrails neck, and little59 bridge), and i thought 50's wiring had the cap connected to both pots?
Last edited by Ashe_Mc at Dec 12, 2011,
#2
The signal voltage in your amplifier will be nowhere near that range. Polypropylene caps are good and 16V is a good rating.
#4
Thanks blargh, in that case, I was thinking of paper in oil, or Jensen, any recommendations?
#5
Rating is far more important than material type. Get a bunch of cheap ceramic types at different values from radioshack- Once you have found the value you prefer, I guarentee if You get the same value cap thats poly or paper in oil or whatever You won't be able to hear a difference.
#6
I don't know, I definitely get a different tone out of different types of cap, even at very close tolerances. I wouldn't spend $20 on a leaky vintage bumblebee or anything, but the Vitamin T PIO ones are cool, as are the old russian ones in the metal can. Both are fairly cheap.
#7
Thanks guys for all of the help and comments.

I'm you going to try a Russian paper in oil, and ceramics.
#8
Make a varitone switch. Its fun for a while, and helps you learn what that guitar really needs. After a month you might want to take it out and 'go normal', but you will know why.
#9
Just get an orange drop 225 series or mallory 150 series and be done with it. It's the farad value that counts. A 600v orange drop at .047 is gonna be bigger than your tone pot.
Last edited by Commodor 64 at Dec 14, 2011,
#10
I wouldn't spend $20 and I wouldn't spend $.08 either. Get a quality cap for a dollar or two. Make sure you understand what the cutoff frequency is and why you chose it.
#11
Quote by Fingerboy18
I wouldn't spend $20 and I wouldn't spend $.08 either. Get a quality cap for a dollar or two. Make sure you understand what the cutoff frequency is and why you chose it.

could you explain that then?


and so idon't have to make another thread -


i may be trading fr a strat/tele on craigslist, and it has a tele in the bridge. i've been thinking that if i get his, i want a humcancelling jazzmaster in the neck. i don't know how noisy jazzmasters are alone (not middle position) so i've been trying to find stacked jazzmaster pickups, but cant find them anywhere.

are there any hum cancelling or stacked jazzmaster pickups out there?
#12
Quote by Roc8995
I don't know, I definitely get a different tone out of different types of cap, even at very close tolerances. I wouldn't spend $20 on a leaky vintage bumblebee or anything, but the Vitamin T PIO ones are cool, as are the old russian ones in the metal can. Both are fairly cheap.


don't buy leaky capz lol
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#13
Quote by Ashe_Mc
could you explain that then?


and so idon't have to make another thread -


i may be trading fr a strat/tele on craigslist, and it has a tele in the bridge. i've been thinking that if i get his, i want a humcancelling jazzmaster in the neck. i don't know how noisy jazzmasters are alone (not middle position) so i've been trying to find stacked jazzmaster pickups, but cant find them anywhere.

are there any hum cancelling or stacked jazzmaster pickups out there?


Yes, the cutoff frequency is where the signal starts being reduced.

The "tone pot" is just a pot with a capacitor across it. An RC circuit (resistor, capacitor) is a tuned circuit. The values of the components determine the starting frequency of the filter. It's basically allowing you to cut out just high signals at a variable amount. This frequency is determined by 1/[2*Pi*Resistance*Capacitance]. Looking at this, we can see that since you change the resistance by turning the pot, you are also changing the amount of high frequencies being eliminated.
#14
The value of the tonecap determines the frequencies that pass through it to ground. The lower the value of the cap, the higher the frequency cut off is. With the tone pot fully open (turned all the way CCW) the entire signal from the guitar hits the tone cap, and some gets bled off to ground. The tone pot adds resistance, which causes some of the signal to bypass the cap and head for the guitar input. The more resistance the pot has the more signal bounces to ground (follows the path of least resistance).
#15
Quote by Commodor 64
The value of the tonecap determines the frequencies that pass through it to ground. The lower the value of the cap, the higher the frequency cut off is. With the tone pot fully open (turned all the way CCW) the entire signal from the guitar hits the tone cap, and some gets bled off to ground. The tone pot adds resistance, which causes some of the signal to bypass the cap and head for the guitar input. The more resistance the pot has the more signal bounces to ground (follows the path of least resistance).


Good explanation. Listen to this guy, he made it much more understandable.