#1
When a players goes into soloing: speed, cheery type of soloing, but before that he played power chords and chugged E like no tommorow with insane amounts of gain.

Do players USUALLY use tweaked settings for soloing, less gain, etc. Or just play with the same ones ???

Going for 'tallica's Shortest Straw, dont see the solo happening on same settings after the rhythm parts without noise going all over the place unless i cut the gain atleast by half coz even the slightest hand movement on muted strings get me unwanted noise.

Or am i just paranoid because lack off skill ???
Last edited by DocArunas at Dec 12, 2011,
#2
less gain for solos?
whenever I play lead I crank the gain higher, if you're getting excess noise try using a noise gate or something, the boss ns-2 is a fairly reliable one
#3
No offense, but it sounds like your technique may need the work rather than the tone itself.

Personally I don't use any more gain for leads - when you're playing lead, you want to cut through the mix, and there are better ways of doing that than cranking the gain.
#4
Quote by :-D
No offense, but it sounds like your technique may need the work rather than the tone itself.

Personally I don't use any more gain for leads - when you're playing lead, you want to cut through the mix, and there are better ways of doing that than cranking the gain.


this.
turn up the mids or the volume for when you play solos, don't increase the gain. mistakes will be much more obvious for a start if you crank the gain.
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#5
Most pro's will crank the gain slightly when playing solo's. Others just simply just increase the volume. They will normally add chorus and reverb to fatten up the sound a bit

I like to pile on the gain and reverb for solos and increase the mids slightly. But the more gain you use, the better your muting has to be.
#6
E|6p9------6p9-------
B|-------7----------7--

Kirk holds the 6 pressed down, yet how can one mute it when going for the 7 if the E string is lower than the B, i dont have a hole in the side of my palm to mute everything and leave a string in the middle. And if I dont mute it goes all over the place...... And at those speeds.... Dat Mess...




The part im talking about.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFoGjm5TMZM#t=4m28s
Last edited by DocArunas at Dec 12, 2011,
#7
Quote by DocArunas
E|6p9------6p9-------
B|-------7----------7--

Kirk holds the 6 pressed down, yet how can one mute it when going for the 7 if the E string is lower than the B, i dont have a hole in the side of my palm to mute everything and leave a string in the middle. And if I dont mute it goes all over the place...... And at those speeds.... Dat Mess...


Because it's kirk i have to ask...

Is he using wah to cover up sloppy technique ?

If not then he's probably the 6 with his ring finger a milisecond before he plays the 7.
#8
Is he using wah to cover up sloppy technique ?

You know the answer to that already.

To answer your question, TS, in the studio, most guitarists use very different settings for their solos than they do for rhythms. Live, that is less often the case, but is still not uncommon to see different settings for leads and solos than rhythms.

For my rhythm parts, I like to use high-gain amp heads with scooped bass, mid-high mids, and high treble. This allows me to get a really tight rhythm sound, especially when my rhythm parts use low tunings. For my lead parts, however, I tend to prefer to have a medium gain amp head with medium-low bass, very high mids, and medium treble with some kind of light overdrive pedal out front, which gives me a warm, smooth sound that works really nicely for high frequency soloing.

You'll see a lot of players nowadays, especially with the advent of more easily portable digital hardware, getting very different lead and rhythm sounds with the push of a button.