#1
How do I do it damnit? So far im studying major, minor, and pentatonic scale patters.....but how do I throw them together and make it sound good? but more importantly


HOW DO I MOVE THESE POSITIONS AROUND THE FRET BOARD IN ORDER TO BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgqqyoVmHa4&feature=related

Look what this guy is doing. My understanding is its simply a pentatonic scale all over the fretboard! How does he do this? Is he taking the root of the scale and switching it to different octaves all over the guitar? Is it random? Please enlighten me!
#2
first of all, learn all the notes on the fretboard
also, ear training
learning songs and solos by other people can't be bad

and practice, practice, practice
#3
guy above is right.
In addition to that you should just try to study music theory in genral, since not only the minor pentatonic sound cool. If you know most of the theory stuff, then you should practice patters so you aren't limited by your technique to pull off your ideas.
#4
Quote by Go0ber
How do I do it damnit? So far im studying major, minor, and pentatonic scale patters.....but how do I throw them together and make it sound good? but more importantly

You sound good by practicing the scales in a musical setting, such as with a backing track or just noodling around by yourself. Understanding the scales is fine, but they're just tools to help you create music.
Quote by Go0ber
HOW DO I MOVE THESE POSITIONS AROUND THE FRET BOARD IN ORDER TO BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE?

Do you know the notes of the fretboard?

Quote by Go0ber
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgqqyoVmHa4&feature=related

Look what this guy is doing. My understanding is its simply a pentatonic scale all over the fretboard! How does he do this? Is he taking the root of the scale and switching it to different octaves all over the guitar? Is it random? Please enlighten me!

He's staying in 12th position primarily - a good exercise to help you develop, though, would be to learn this solo by ear. It'd let you see how he's approaching the notes, as well as train your ear, which is your greatest tool towards making your playing sound good.
#5
Quote by Go0ber
How do I do it damnit? So far im studying major, minor, and pentatonic scale patters.....but how do I throw them together and make it sound good? but more importantly


HOW DO I MOVE THESE POSITIONS AROUND THE FRET BOARD IN ORDER TO BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgqqyoVmHa4&feature=related

Look what this guy is doing. My understanding is its simply a pentatonic scale all over the fretboard! How does he do this? Is he taking the root of the scale and switching it to different octaves all over the guitar? Is it random? Please enlighten me!

You do it by losing your fixation with the physical aspects of playing the guitar. You can stare at scale charts all day long and memorise as many patterns as you like, but until you start thinking about what you want to play and really listening to yourself and whats goiing on around you nothing much is going to happen. You're not aiming to "move positions around the fretboard" at all, you're aiming to make music.

And making music starts with the musician, NOT the instrument. If you don't have something to say then no amount of time you spend with an instrument will change that. So forget your scales, forget your patterns, forget your guitar even for the time being. Listen to what you're going to be playing over, think about what would sound good over it...what do you want to hear over it? When you have an idea about what you want to create, that's when you pick up the guitar and use your knowledge of the instrument to figure out how the hell to get that idea out of your head and out through your guitar.

Sound is always your first consideration, you can worry about the technical aspects after you've got that sorted.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

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#6
Quote by Go0ber
How do I do it damnit? So far im studying major, minor, and pentatonic scale patters.....but how do I throw them together and make it sound good? but more importantly


HOW DO I MOVE THESE POSITIONS AROUND THE FRET BOARD IN ORDER TO BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgqqyoVmHa4&feature=related

Look what this guy is doing. My understanding is its simply a pentatonic scale all over the fretboard! How does he do this? Is he taking the root of the scale and switching it to different octaves all over the guitar? Is it random? Please enlighten me!


well, you have to get some experience playing some actual solos. You don't just learn scales, or even just learn theory, and then " BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE".

It takes awhile to develop the necessary skills and knowledge. Not gonna happen by getting random advice online. You gotta put in the time and effort yourself.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by steven seagull
You do it by losing your fixation with the physical aspects of playing the guitar. You can stare at scale charts all day long and memorise as many patterns as you like, but until you start thinking about what you want to play and really listening to yourself and whats goiing on around you nothing much is going to happen. You're not aiming to "move positions around the fretboard" at all, you're aiming to make music.

And making music starts with the musician, NOT the instrument. If you don't have something to say then no amount of time you spend with an instrument will change that. So forget your scales, forget your patterns, forget your guitar even for the time being. Listen to what you're going to be playing over, think about what would sound good over it...what do you want to hear over it? When you have an idea about what you want to create, that's when you pick up the guitar and use your knowledge of the instrument to figure out how the hell to get that idea out of your head and out through your guitar.

Sound is always your first consideration, you can worry about the technical aspects after you've got that sorted.



Quite possible the biggest load of horse shit in this thread Forget scales? Forget patterns? While were at it lets just throw away our elementary knowledge of triads, 7th chords, and movable chord positions on the guitar as well! That way we can just continue to play annoying chromatic shit that we can vomit all over the place at guitar center and really "FEEL" the music


Seriously though your not the only one, all of you need to stop it with the guitarist jedi bullshit. Not one of you has answered my question and YES I do know the notes on the fretboard which is why im posting this to begin with. My question is what is happening when a guy plays a scale (for ex A minor pentatonic), then moves up the fretboard and starts playing the same scale pattern?


Did he just change scales altogether? Is he still in A minor just a couple octaves up? Is he in a relative major key? Whats happening when people are moving scale positions all around the fretboard?

THANKS
Last edited by Go0ber at Dec 13, 2011,
#8
You fuckin' fail.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#12
It looks like he's just playing in Am pentatonic, although maybe it's Em pentatonic, I didn't look that closely, and they're almost identical.

Remember that a scale is just a selection of notes. Am pentatonic is just the notes A, C, D, E, and G.

Those notes, obviously, appear all over the fretboard. They exist in several "box patterns" which you can find by googling.

That being said, I think many young guitarists make a mistake by rushing out to learn a bunch of box patterns - and this is why what Steven Seagull wrote is very, very important. Your ultimate goal is to not be thinking in terms of box patterns at all, but in terms of sounds.

How do you get there? Well, I happen to think that learning a whole bunch of box patterns is a mistake, because it reinforces the physical - rather than the musical - aspect of your playing. You should start playing in ONE box pattern, and focus on the sounds you're making. Work on your ear so that you are THINKING in music.

Then you will naturally start to move around the fretboard as you have ideas you want to express which are easier to express in other parts of the neck. With a solid ear, and a good grounding in the SOUND of the scale, you will find additional "box patterns" relatively easy to learn and remember. (Whereas they'll be hard to remember, and you'll just sound like you're wanking around in box patterns, if you memorize the box patterns before you have that core musical understanding).
#13
Quote by Go0ber
Quite possible the biggest load of horse shit in this thread Forget scales? Forget patterns? While were at it lets just throw away our elementary knowledge of triads, 7th chords, and movable chord positions on the guitar as well! That way we can just continue to play annoying chromatic shit that we can vomit all over the place at guitar center and really "FEEL" the music


Seriously though your not the only one, all of you need to stop it with the guitarist jedi bullshit. Not one of you has answered my question and YES I do know the notes on the fretboard which is why im posting this to begin with. My question is what is happening when a guy plays a scale (for ex A minor pentatonic), then moves up the fretboard and starts playing the same scale pattern?


Did he just change scales altogether? Is he still in A minor just a couple octaves up? Is he in a relative major key? Whats happening when people are moving scale positions all around the fretboard?

THANKS
It doesn't seem like you have any elementary knowledge of music theory to throw away. That whole solo uses the pentatonic scale. No modulations whatsoever.

You should listen to the advice Steven Seagull gave. The problem a lot of guitarists have soloing is that they approach it with scale shapes. Mindlessly fumbling your way around a scale will not create a musical solo, you need to consider phrasing and note choice (hitting chord tones), and aspects like dynamics which are largely forgotten. A good way to do that is to take a step away from the guitar and listen to the music - what would be appropriate for the particular song? An important aspect of solos is not the solo itself, but how it interacts with the rest of the music.

Forget about the theory though, you need to go back to the basics in that regard. Make sure you can apply what you've learnt before you move on. Until you can apply it, it's essentially useless.
#14
First off, cut the entitled attitude out and stop insulting people simply because you don't like what they have to say. You're being offered good advice; whether or not you choose to actually do something with it is up to you. I don't know why I'm responding, seeing as you're acting like a whining douche, but here we go.

First things first, he's in straight up E minor the entire way. No key changes, nothing - this is why looking for the patterns isn't enough, because it'll lead you into assuming things like a position shift signal a modulation.
Quote by Go0ber
Quite possible the biggest load of horse shit in this thread Forget scales? Forget patterns? While were at it lets just throw away our elementary knowledge of triads, 7th chords, and movable chord positions on the guitar as well!

You need to stop taking stuff out of context; he said to forget those things for the time being so that you can listen to what you're playing over. Once you know what you want to play, that's when you actually go and play it. The most important aspect of improvising, or as you put it "MOVE THESE POSITIONS AROUND THE FRET BOARD IN ORDER TO BUST OUT AWESOME SOLOS ALL OVER THE PLACE", is to be able to listen to what's going on around you. That's what he was saying, and it's spot on; you just chose to read about five words and insult him for no reason.

Quote by Go0ber
Seriously though your not the only one, all of you need to stop it with the guitarist jedi bullshit. Not one of you has answered my question and YES I do know the notes on the fretboard which is why im posting this to begin with. My question is what is happening when a guy plays a scale (for ex A minor pentatonic), then moves up the fretboard and starts playing the same scale pattern?

Everyone has answered your question (Xiaoxi included, his answer probably the most accurate) and if you had listened, you'd already have the answer to this. The fact that somebody moves his hand up to a different position doesn't mean the key is changing, it simply means that he's playing in a different position. Sometimes it will mean a key change, sometimes not, but it depends on the music itself rather than the position. In the solo you linked, he's playing the same scale at a different place on the neck.


Quote by Go0ber
Did he just change scales altogether? Is he still in A minor just a couple octaves up? Is he in a relative major key? Whats happening when people are moving scale positions all around the fretboard?

See the explanation above; had you heeded the "worst advice in this thread" you'd have been able to realize that when you listen to the music, the key stays the same regardless of where his hand goes.

That's about all there is to it, and yes, it has been explained to you multiple times. There's no reason to behave like an asshole; you've been offered perfectly good advice, and it's time you cut the stupid attitude, sat the fuck down and tried to understand what it is we're telling you.

I hope that's clear.
#16
If your sole aim is to write licks that blow people away, then you don't need to learn a scale in a 3 octave or even two octave pattern. But do bear in mind you'll have to practice said lick over and over and over again until you have it under control and can play it in any key. However, by the time you get that far, the lick will have expired all its blowing power.

By forgetting what you know... like starting from a blank slate, like its your first day on guitar... and listening to what the piece is calling for (from inside) you will definitely grasp what birdman is talking about. Jedi tricks only go so far. You still have to switch your torch on when its dark. You will never truly forget your shapes/scales/patterns or theory... but you won't be relying on them completely or at all either. This is how you get to solo. Some solo's sound like scales going up and down... while some solo's are a painting.

Think of your note to chord relationship. The fast notes don't count... the long ones are the one's that are remembered and stick to the listener like glue.

In a nutshell, phrasing and chord/note relationship. Blow your wad however you see fit, but on sustaining notes, make them count. Have a melody that fits the song.

Otherwise, play what he plays and mimic his feel in your next solo. If it works for you, cool. If it doesn't, ah well... too many choices for you to work with. Find one that works, or find an answer that works for you. Mine probably won't but i'll post anyway. I like the sight of my own text.