#1
I'm not sure if my technique is bad, but i want to find out. If getting a teacher is the way, then i reckon i'll find one and take some lessons.

I have already tried looking at other people playing on youtube but that never seems effective.

I can see they are playing a little different, but when i change my hand to look like theirs (specifically talking about bending here), it doesn't feel right and it way uncomfortable.

I have heard people say that your wrist of your fretting hand should be as straight as possible... mine is like never straight, unless i'm playing on the upper strings. Like, how would you play Message in Blood with a straight wrist?

Do i just need to follow some exersizes which will force me into proper technique? or..

Simply, i feel progress slowing down. I want to find the next thing which will speed things up, and i'm wondering if this is it.

Thanks!
#2
You can... but you'll be doing it blind. I think my technique is almost perfect, just working out a few kinks, and I'm self-taught.

But that's after nearly seven years of playing, and many of those years spent working out what to do. If you can, get a teacher.
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#3
Hello, Chockomonkey!

Personally I suggest you find a good teacher. There are 2 main reasons for doing this:

1. You can't always tell what is wrong with your technique. You might simply not be aware of it. There's noting more valuable than a teacher that is able to guide you in an effective way. Trust me, I had the same trouble in the past.

2. Great teacher will not only teach you how to play guitar but will also be a source of inspiration. I noticed that you feel quite helpless about your musical situation. Finding a teacher that will be able to inspire and motivate you would be a good solution.
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Neal Wakefield
#4
In theory, if you pay enough attention to your playing and listen closely to your body and common sense, you should spot almost all errors instantly.

Trouble is, generally you don't know what it should feel like and you're making systematic errors that are totally ingrained in your playing. A good teacher can point those out and also prevent you going up "dead ends" where your technique is good only to a certain point but a limiting factor in the long run.
#5
I notice a lot wrong with my technique looking at other people play, but a teacher is so expensive my way so I've never went down that road plus I've been playing long enough that I feel like I shouldn't need one.

Suppose youtube is our best option when we're skint
#6
If you make a video for us, we can critique your playing and tell you of any flaws we find in your playing. A face-to-face, one-on-one teacher is almost always helpful, but we're also here to help.
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#7
A teacher might not even know if you have bad technique. It's really just about making things feel as physically effortless to play as possible, however you choose to do it.
#8
Maybe i'll start with a video, though i have no means of recording, i'm sure i can find someone's something to borrow.

In the meantime, I have been exploring various teachers on craigslist. A question i have regarding teachers: How do you know if they're good? Too broad i know. So let me ask this: What are some things your teachers have done, which you've found helpful? If i make the plunge and drop some money on a few lessons, i want to have an idea of what they should be delivering.

Thanks!
#9
What they'll deliver depends on their teaching style, what you want to do, and what they feel you need to do.

What I'd suggest you do to evaluate them is -

Ask for a single lesson, explain you've never done them before and you just want to try one out. (there may be a slightly higher rate for a one-off but it's worth it to test things out)

If you've found a good teacher, you'll know by the end of the lesson. You'll have learnt things and had fun!

If they're good but you don't click personally, feel free to try a few different teachers. Teachers understand that even with good students and good teachers, personality clashes happen.
#10
Quote by Chockomonkey
Maybe i'll start with a video, though i have no means of recording, i'm sure i can find someone's something to borrow.

In the meantime, I have been exploring various teachers on craigslist. A question i have regarding teachers: How do you know if they're good? Too broad i know. So let me ask this: What are some things your teachers have done, which you've found helpful? If i make the plunge and drop some money on a few lessons, i want to have an idea of what they should be delivering.

Thanks!


If going out after a lesson you feel excited about it, inspired, you know what to practice and you feel a drive to practice even harder - this means your teacher is good for you.

What's more if you're progressing faster than you used to progress practicing alone - that's a good sign.

Great teacher will also make sure to know what your goals are and your style of playing and your skills at the moment (what you need to develop in order to achieve your musical goals, he will point out weak areas preserving from further development etc.)
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Neal Wakefield
#11
Study Classical guitarist's fret hands, and Paul Gilbert's picking hand, You will never have wrong technique.
#12
I cannot learn guitar well without a teacher, but I believe there are talents can learn well by themselves.
#13
Start watching Oli Herbert's from all that remains lessons. That man is a great teacher, and has impecable technique, minus some tension occasionally in the shoulders.

It's entirely possible to get good technique if your self taught, it just takes ALOT of practice and dedication.


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