#1
hi guys,
ive been planning on getting a JCA5212RC recently but i am now contemplating getting a JCA2112RC to save money but the fact that its a 1 channel amps slightly bothers me coz i dont want to have to turn the knobs in gigs to get overdrive. would 20w be enough for gigging?
should i get the JCA5212RC or save money on the JCA2112RC and use my distortion pedals (EHX English Muff'n, Boss DS-2) to get the rest of the sound.
#2
Quote by Twisted Mr
well, 20w wont be very much if planning on gigging with a drummer, you'll just get drowned out and if your venue is a little big then it wont easily be heard at the back. 20w is alright if your maybe playing at a high school gym with another guitarist and singer. From my experience, in a smaller area your still gonna be competing with the drums, although if your amp is maxed out it might work.


20 watts is fine... If you can hear your self on stage, Mic it to the PA for the room to hear, run it through monitors for the rest of the band to hear...

20 watts is loud for a guitar amp,

I run a single channel and set it as clean as possible, then let my pedals dictate distortion, OD, or boost...
Yea.. It's old school.. but I'm old... and it's worked for me..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#3
Well if you're playing any shows where your amp will be mic'd (like most reasonable club shows), I don't think volume would be too much of an issue. Especially considering that it's a tube combo. I don't have any experience with that amp though, I just thought I'd throw in my 2 cents
#4
there's a 2 channel version of the 20.

there's also a cheaper version of the 50 combo that doesn't have reverb.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
#5
I'd go for a 50. My 40 watt Hiwatt Studio/Stage and my 35 watt Cornford Hellcat sometimes had issues with not being loud enough. Thought I'd try and get in there before someone tells you that their HT-5 unmiced is enough for a gig with 1000 people, with the volume on 2.
Quote by Skraeling86
That's a lot of booze. Frankly, I'm impressed. You're of a stronger timber than the average man, jimbob! Hail you.



Quote by Bubban
Yes you should go to a doctor, fucking moron. We can't do anything about your hemorrhoid.


#6
It all depends on how you want it to sound man... crank the shit out of the amp and see if you like it... any employees give you any shit, pull out your wallet and set it on the amp.
#7
Quote by Papabear505
20 watts is fine... If you can hear your self on stage, Mic it to the PA for the room to hear, run it through monitors for the rest of the band to hear...

20 watts is loud for a guitar amp,

I run a single channel and set it as clean as possible, then let my pedals dictate distortion, OD, or boost...
Yea.. It's old school.. but I'm old... and it's worked for me..


How are pedals into a clean amp old school?

TS, you're going to want something bigger if you want cleans when gigging. 20w isn't really going to cut it.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#8
Quote by jimbob78
I'd go for a 50. My 40 watt Hiwatt Studio/Stage and my 35 watt Cornford Hellcat sometimes had issues with not being loud enough. Thought I'd try and get in there before someone tells you that their HT-5 unmiced is enough for a gig with 1000 people, with the volume on 2.


My 100 watt isn't loud enough to play 1000 people un mic'd...

If it's blowing me off the stage, it's too loud... everything on stage, should be heard for the most part through the PA Main speakers... You get better control over the mix. If I go to a club, and it's big enough to actually have a 4 or 5 piece band, and the band doesn't run their equipment through the PA, it's usually an amateurish bunch of Highschool kids that think "WE ROCK!!!" and typically.......... we don't stay long, because it sounds really bad...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#10
Quote by mmolteratx
How are pedals into a clean amp old school?



Not necessarily the concept of pedals and a clean amp, perhaps a one channel, simple, "makes the guitar louder" type deal... I've never used a "Distortion channel" on an amp.. (never had an amp with a distortion channel) I know the technology has changed a bit in the last 30 years... I've just not changed with it... thats what I meant... Up until 3 weeks ago, I used a 74 twin reverb, never turned it up past 4, clean as a whistle unless I pressed a stomp box... an MXR distortion + from 1981, till it broke.. Now it's a Delta Labs Over Drive ...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
Last edited by Papabear505 at Dec 13, 2011,
#11
You could also set your channel to your preferred overdrive sound, and then lower your guitar's volume knob to get a clean tone.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#12
Quote by Xeron Brigs
You could also set your channel to your preferred overdrive sound, and then lower your guitar's volume knob to get a clean tone.

I've always had issues with doing this and getting the results I want. I like my overdrive tones warm and my cleans crisp/bright. My amp will clean up just fine on the overdrive channel by cutting the volume, but it's too warm and muddy for my tastes. An EQ pedal could certainly fix that. But I'd rather have two dedicated channels with their own EQs that I can set exactly how I want and just switch between them.

Of course there are tons of people that rock a 1-channel amp and have no problems at all (the JCM800 was and is one of the most popular Marshalls ever made). I just like to have more "on demand" versatility I guess...
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2
#13
Quote by Twisted Mr
well, 20w wont be very much if planning on gigging with a drummer, you'll just get drowned out and if your venue is a little big then it wont easily be heard at the back. 20w is alright if your maybe playing at a high school gym with another guitarist and singer. From my experience, in a smaller area your still gonna be competing with the drums, although if your amp is maxed out it might work.
It's a 20 watt tube amp. If he doesn't scoop his mids, he'll be fine. It will be very loud.
Quote by MightyAl
I took a pic of myself, cut a hole in the face and stuck my knob through so i could see what I'd look like if I got bitten by a radioactive elephant.
#15
Quote by 57Goldtop
I've always had issues with doing this and getting the results I want. I like my overdrive tones warm and my cleans crisp/bright. My amp will clean up just fine on the overdrive channel by cutting the volume, but it's too warm and muddy for my tastes. An EQ pedal could certainly fix that. But I'd rather have two dedicated channels with their own EQs that I can set exactly how I want and just switch between them.


I hear that. What I tend to do if I have to play a one channel amp is I'll set the channel to be as distorted and bright as I will ever need to use. At that point, if I'm playing clean I'll roll down the volume knob on the neck pickup and have a bright-sounding clean tone, and I'll also lower the tone knob on the bridge pickup until I get it warm sounding and lower the volume until I get a good rhythm tone.

At that point, your pickup selector switch kind of turns into your channel selector, and you can go from clean to distorted by changing from the neck to the bridge. Raise the volume on the bridge and the tone knob and you'll get a lead tone.

Overall though, I still prefer to have more than one channel for the versatility, but you would be surprised the amount of tones you can coax out of a one channel amp with some turns of the volume and tone knobs.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#16
Yeah, that's a good way to go if you're working with a 1-channel amp. I have nothing against them at all. I've just always had multi-channel amps so that's what I've gotten used to. But you're right, playing thru a 1-channel amp really teaches you how to use your guitar's tone/volume/pickup selector to alter your tone.
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2