#1
I recently purchased the ISP Decimator online and am now waiting for it to be shipped. Today I suddenly came across online that apparently the standard Decimator may have issues when switching from distorted to clean. On my amp I use a channel switch which comes out the back to change between the clean and distorted channels so it does not touch the front input that the pedal uses. Will I have any issues using this with the standard decimator or should I have bought the G String version?

Thanks
#2
I have never heard of that issue before now.
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#3
I think its something to do with the threshold needing to be changed when going from the distortion to clean, although a lot of people mention effects loops which I don't know much about to be honest.
#4
Quote by Randomnez
I think its something to do with the threshold needing to be changed when going from the distortion to clean, although a lot of people mention effects loops which I don't know much about to be honest.


Mostly this. I have the same issue with it on my pedalboard. I just set the threshold so it cuts off noise as long as I hold my guitar (it does have some grounding issues). Like this, it still sounds staccato when I need it to, but the cleans don't really cut off.
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#7
never really had a problem
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#8
k - you will want to run your decimator in the effects loop. Short story of what an effects loop is.

Signal looks like this.

Guitar to Amp Input

Amp processes the signal and does some stuff in the "preamp" stage like adds distortion

then sends that signal out the "send" of your effects loop

from the send of your effects loop you will connect your decimator

your decimator will listen for sound and when it gets to a certain level it will let it pass through. if its too low it will cut it out.

out of your decimator backinto your amp via the "return" jack

from there the signal goes to your power amp section

then to your cab

the reason you run the decimator in the loop is to get rid of noise coming from your preamp section specifically the distortion in many cases.

With that decimator it can get tricky to get a best fit setting for both clean and distorted but you will just have to play around with it..
#9
Thanks for all the help guys. Surjer I think I get what you mean but I'm trying to get my head round what you saying exactly. I take it i would have my setup as:

guitar-->decimator---->guitar head <--------channel switch (from the rear switch pedal input).

Does the switching between channels this way class as an effects loop? When I switch will I have turn the decimator off to get the clean tones? I know that on the G string you have extra inputs which I guessed was only for if I had other pedals plugged in between the guitar and head input but obviously if the channel switch goes in through another input on the head then it wouldn't touch these extra inputs on the G string if I had it.

I hope this makes sense and sorry for my lack on knowledge here. My band usually only uses distortion but recently we have started making use of the second channel so I'm only just beginning to learn about these things.

Quote by surjer
k - you will want to run your decimator in the effects loop. Short story of what an effects loop is.

Signal looks like this.

Guitar to Amp Input

Amp processes the signal and does some stuff in the "preamp" stage like adds distortion

then sends that signal out the "send" of your effects loop

from the send of your effects loop you will connect your decimator

your decimator will listen for sound and when it gets to a certain level it will let it pass through. if its too low it will cut it out.

out of your decimator backinto your amp via the "return" jack

from there the signal goes to your power amp section

then to your cab

the reason you run the decimator in the loop is to get rid of noise coming from your preamp section specifically the distortion in many cases.

With that decimator it can get tricky to get a best fit setting for both clean and distorted but you will just have to play around with it..
#10
Ahh, you are confused friend.. =)

Tell ya what - go look at your amp and tell me if you see any jacks on it labeled "Send" and "return"? - Acoording to the specs i looked up it should have it but i may have been looking at the wrong amp.

Anyways - EFfects Loop isnt a "style" of connecting things up its an actual feature of your amp. Some amps do not have an effects loop so you have no way of running ANY noise gate to filter the preamp noise. Meaning, you would only be filtering the noise from your pedal chain before reaching your amp and any noise your amp adds would still come through.

An effects loop is a way of sending your signal OUT of your amp, Filtering the noise, then sending it back in. but like i said you have to have an amp that supports the effects loop. it will be an obvious 1/4" jack that says "send" and another one that says "Return"

I'll explain the G-string and the 4 cable method next but 1st find out if your amp even has an effects loop..
#12
Unfortunately my head is at a practice studio at the moment, however im pretty sure i've seen an effects loop and it seems to mention it on online specs. I use a footswitch plugged in to change between the two channels, with no other pedals. I take it then that rather than plug the Decimator into the main input between the guitar and head I plug it into the send and return on the back of the head and that will filter the sound when I switch channels?
#14
yeah, by having it in the effects loop you are filtering the noise of the amp. If you were to run it from your guitar into the decimator then into the input jack all you would be filtering is the noise of your guitar. Which is clean so no noise to speak of really. it would essentially be doing nothing. (now, if you were using a distortion pedal it would be a little different story. basically, you want that decimator "AFTER" the distortion.

NOW, the 4 cable method...

So, you are worried about loosing sustain when switching to the clean channel. The problems you heard of are true to some extent and this is where the 4 cable method shines in MY opinion. (Others have their opinions to so please take everything you read on ANY forum with a grain of salt.)

By running a 4 cable method you are no longer strictly listening to the 1 signal coming into the noise filter to decide what is loud enough and what isnt. You actually run out of your effects loop as well as out of your guitar. So it will listen in to your clean guitar sound to help better define where the cut off should occur. So, you can get away with two completely different channels on your amp without effecting the gate settings. This is because switching to that clean channel doesnt change your monitoring levels at the noise gate. The gate is still just listening in to your guitar signal and make the same decisions it made on that dirty channel...

Long story short, with that amp you should be happy with the decimator. BUT, i am not you and we all have our little quarks and get frustrated with differernt things. Best bet is to try it out and see how you like it. Personally, i would have went for the BOSS-NS2 but i dare say that outloud without starting a very loud conversation. Funny, thats the exact oposit function of a gate... lol
#15
lol yeah. I must admit I am surprised you say the NS2 but as you said different people like different things. Anyways you've helped a lot, I just hope it works ok and I don't have to try switch it for the G String haha but atleast now I understand how it all works roughly. Cheers