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#1
So I am planning on going to university next summer. I looked at the courses being offered and to me economics and political sciences seem to be the most interesting subject areas. However I am not really sure if job chances are very great with degrees in those subjects. So does anyone in the pit currently study such a course, knows similar courses or knows something on getting a job with a degree in economics or political sciences?
#4
Get degree in economics -> sink the economy.

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#8
Are you talking about economics the science or just the business side. Big difference.
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#10
outlook not so good. better off going into finance than economy. lots of demand for actuaries, especially pension actuaries. Micro and macro economics 101 are likely to be requisites of the program and you could take your electives in poli sci.
#11
Quote by Neo Evil11
Are you talking about economics the science or just the business side. Big difference.

Not exactly sure yet, but as I am currently studying the science of economics I would probably do so in uni as well then.
#12
Nope but I literally just finished writing the final draft of my personal statement. 4000 characters exactly
Just felt like sharing that completely unrelated point in a University thread.

What classes as a Political science anyway? I know a few people doing a degree in general Politics.
#14
No matter what the degree, stop considering it a key to a job.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#15
Quote by Tangerineseeker
Not exactly sure yet, but as I am currently studying the science of economics I would probably do so in uni as well then.


If you do the science, you can find a lot of jobs. Just no always the ones that pay you 100.000.

Also what the guy said about it not only being the key to a job. It's about wanting to know stuff and self exploration >.>.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#16
Quote by Xiaoxi
No matter what the degree, stop considering it a key to a job.


Forget what I said earlier. This is the correct answer.
#17
Quote by Xiaoxi
No matter what the degree, stop considering it a key to a job.

Yeah I guess that is true and should be considered.
But I also just don't want to study for 3 years, waste a bunch of money and not be able to get a proper job after. I wanted to apply for police and foreign office but that didn't work out...
#21
Quote by Tangerineseeker

But I also just don't want to study for 3 years, waste a bunch of money and not be able to get a proper job after.

So in that 3 years, figure out what it is that you are passionate about, and then find the necessary resources and get your foot in the door. You're only wasting money if all you have to show for it is a piece of paper that says you passed all the classes.

People who are valuable assets are ones who are passionate about what they do, no matter what it is, and take the initiative to do something meaningful. People who are not valuable assets are the ones who come off an assembly line asking if there's a spot to be mediocre.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Dec 13, 2011,
#22
Quote by Xiaoxi
No matter what the degree, stop considering it a key to a job.

This is damn good advice. There's a lotta people who don't care about their course. You're gonna be studying in detail at least one area - make it an area of interest. Otherwise it might bite you, especially if it's a subject with more work.

For each degree you can literally look up employment statistics. Hell, you might find employment statistics for the specific course you want from your specific university. The issue is that these don't take into consideration the work they take up. There's also bias problems when looking at average incomes for people with specific degrees.
Last edited by Craigo at Dec 13, 2011,
#23
Don't go into economics, every idiot goes into that thinking they become CEO of their own multi-million companies.
#24
Quote by Zeletros
Don't go into economics, every idiot goes into that thinking they become CEO of their own multi-million companies.


No he wanted to do the science, not the business side. Big difference.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#25
Quote by Tangerineseeker
Yeah I guess that is true and should be considered.
But I also just don't want to study for 3 years, waste a bunch of money and not be able to get a proper job after. I wanted to apply for police and foreign office but that didn't work out...

I do History and Philosophy. I chose this course specifically because I originally wanted to do history before I realised I really love philosophy. It's a passion which consumes a fair amount of my leisure time. However, I chose to do a joint honours instead of just philosophy (roughly 50% of my course is spent on either topic) to improve my chances of employment and better employment. I'm happy with my decision, even though I definitely prefer philosophy.

However, I couldn't stand the history side of my course if I didn't enjoy it. There's a lot of work involved, and I couldn't swallow a lot of it if I didn't like it. And I definitely know I'm happy that I didn't do a straight up History degree considering the work load and type of work.

You're going to be studying for about three years, you should pick something you enjoy. It'd be nasty if you picked something you didn't like, committing yourself to work you consider pointless and arbitrary for three years. Pick your degree for employment if you don't want to go just for the learning and for the experience, but make sure you pick something you're going to enjoy. You'll find essays on macroeconomics demoralising if you pick economics when you just don't care about it.
Last edited by Craigo at Dec 13, 2011,
#26
Quote by Xiaoxi
No matter what the degree, stop considering it a key to a job.

Spoken like a true music major
#27
Oh yeah, flash of inspiration.

In the magical world of today, you can find lectures to first year University modules and more online. They might be a seriously good indicator of what you should do at University.
#28
Engineering is one of the few tracks a student can take and practically have a job guaranteed, but this is only because close to two thirds of those who try it fail and switch to non-science majors, effectively weeding out anyone lacking rigorous analytic skills.

I currently have three standing job offers in construction management, reservoir engineering, and energy trading software, but I may not accept any of them. Oh yeah, and I've got a 2.8 GPA with four more semesters to complete.

If you complete an engineering degree, have strong personal skills, and introduce yourself to the right people, I guarantee you can work in any field you want.
#29
Economics? **** that, go own a pizza joint.
“Just to sum up: I would do various things very quickly.” - Donald Trump
#30
Hell, just don't become a banker. My uni has one of the strongest business schools in the world, and it's soul crushing how many people come, do a 3 year degree and then **** off to the City and spend the rest of their lives leeching off of humanity and being PAID 6 figure salaries to do so.

Have a think about what you want to do, I mean a political science degree can surely help you to get a job in politics? You said something about the foreign office, a PolSci degree will probably (don't quote me on this, check with a careers advisor) help you get a foot in the door there. Failing that, just do the one that you prefer. If you know vaguely what sort of job you want, and either of those degrees is even remotely lapplicable to it, just go and do the degree and try to get relevant work experience too. That's often the first rung of the ladder. Once you're on the ladder, it's a whole lot easier to get to where you want to be,
#31
Why bother ? Focus on getting some money so you can call yourself a labourer.

Unless you are a hipster elitist ?
#32
You're more likely to get a job if you have some previous work experience. Just a degree isn't enough.
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#33
Ima be studying mostly polisci and sociology in college as well. Job outlook? Bad. Fucks given? None. It'll sort itself out, and I'd rather study something I want to than something I don't, ya dig?
#34
Quote by SkepsisMetal
Nope but I literally just finished writing the final draft of my personal statement. 4000 characters exactly
Just felt like sharing that completely unrelated point in a University thread.


What classes as a Political science anyway? I know a few people doing a degree in general Politics.

That's UCAS right? I was only two lines off the limit, and had only 3300 characters or so. How did you manage 4000?
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#35
TS, I'm interested in the same fields, although all social sciences interest me, and I may go for something music related instead. I have a couple years to decide,

Anyway, don't think of it as being "successful" and getting "good jobs". It's depressing how people see as the purpose of education these days. Do it because that's what you care about.
#36
Ok I'm a business major and I just had my Macroeconomic final earlier. Not that it was difficult, but it also isn't super easy and it is also extremely boring. I have my poli sci test this Thursday, this is different from econ in the sense that it is really easy. I didn't even buy the book this semester and set the curve on the test without studying. I have the final Thursday but poli sci is also extremely boring and pretty depressing how necessarily jealous people are and how necessarily hungry for power they are.
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#37
Stop thinking of university as a way to get a job. Do something you enjoy.
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#38
Quote by jambi_mantra
Stop thinking of university as a way to get a job. Do something you enjoy.


While I understand you can hugely disappoint yourself with a job you hate, I really don't see anyone hiring me to play guitar or for barely applicable (at least for now) theoretical physics.
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#39
Studying polo sci, plan to be a professor. There's a lot of things you can do with a degree, but thy dont all pay ery well and there's also a lot of people who study it. If you study it, take any study abroad/away course you can, try to get internships and things of the like.

Adding to what people said, do what you're passionate about. What would you be happier with? A job where you get a good salary but don't enjoy your job or a job where you don't make that much but you love your job?

If you're passionate about those things you can find jobs. It might not be easy, it might take awhile, you (other than some fields) won't make as much money as other degrees, but if it's what you love then follow it.
Last edited by TheZephyrSon at Dec 13, 2011,
#40
Quote by sfaune92
That's UCAS right? I was only two lines off the limit, and had only 3300 characters or so. How did you manage 4000?


Yeah. I'm not entirely sure what goes as what. Are you doing the count on the word processor or on the statement form? Because 1 line on MS word is a lot different to 1 line on the UCAS form I found out. It's deceptive.

Just checked it now, I'm 4000 words with 3 of them on the 47th line
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