#1
Hi,

I recently acquired a 50's spec les Paul junior and the tone is amazing!

The problem is that I am finding it very hard to get used to the 50's large style neck. (the famous rounded profile)

I am usually use to playing Fender's, which have really skinny necks in comparison; I've even switched from 11's to 9's to compesate; but still can't play nearly as well or fasr on the Gibson.

Is there any advice or tips on how to get used to or play efficiently on this style neck?

Any help much appreciated.
#2
You can't "make" yourself like it. You either get used to it after a while or you don't. Hey, those necks worked just fine for Jimmy Page, so it can be done.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
Unfortunately, there is no real way to get physically accustomed to a different neck. What I mean is that if the neck is too big for your hands and you can't effectively play it, there's no way to make your hands bigger or the neck smaller since it is a set neck. That's why it's always heavily advised to play a guitar before buying it.
#4
If you can't get yourself to like the neck, then you might need to consider other guitars. Try it out for a while, but seriously, you changed to 9's??
Getting used to necks might be hard.. For example, I had an Ibanez RG505 for nearly a year, but realized that while the neck feels "neat" it could be a little bit beefier. So I got a new guitar with a much beefier and much better feeling neck. Also, to mention, a lot better tone and feel in general, in my opinion.
Ugh, so skinny strings... I can't even use 10's in E standard on a LP
Gear pics

Quote by Cathbard
Bugera cloning Blackstar is a scandal cloaked in a tragedy making love to a nightmare.

Last edited by Sakke at Dec 13, 2011,
#5
Just keep playing and you will get used to it, always different playing on different guitars.
Gibson 58 RI VOS Custombuckers
Mesa Lonestar Special 2x12
#6
As others said, you either get used to it or you don't. I've had some guitars that had neck profiles I hated, no matter how much I played them. But I had no problems getting used to my LP after a while. Everybody's different.
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2
#7
Quote by cola4369
Hi,

I recently acquired a 50's spec les Paul junior and the tone is amazing!

The problem is that I am finding it very hard to get used to the 50's large style neck. (the famous rounded profile)

I am usually use to playing Fender's, which have really skinny necks in comparison; I've even switched from 11's to 9's to compesate; but still can't play nearly as well or fasr on the Gibson.

Is there any advice or tips on how to get used to or play efficiently on this style neck?

Any help much appreciated.



i had the same problem sold my les paul jr 57 reissue ( epiphone custom shop ) for that reason . i had the TV YELLOW epiphone custom 57 reissue , . good guitar but neck too big .

i have small fingers and couldnt play the damn thing .

sell the guitar .. get an Agile 3200 SLIM .. youll have equal /better ( neck thru , ebony ) than you les paul studio and they have a very confortable feel . Get the SLIM version .. its slim like an Ibanez .. amazing playability for small hands .

Agile hands down over epiphone /gibson neck wise .

The stardard Agile is 21.5 mm ( its similar to the 60's slim taper ) from gibson .. the agile SLIM is 17 mm .. thats similar to an ibanez . .really thin . amazing playability if you have small hands


Sorry man im in love with my les paul copy . agile 3200 slim for 600 $ .. cant find better .

sorry to be a bit hype .. but after having that 50's round neck ( baseball bat ) i couldnt play and end up selling , im so happy to have found a confortable les paul .

a bit two thumbs down at Gibson for making the studio /jr with a big 50's neck . unless i would have probably went for a studio when i was shopping . But i went agile and dont look back now
Bedroom rock star :

- Gibson Les paul Standard 2001 Honeyburst .
- Agile 3200 Slim
Last edited by Skysc at Dec 13, 2011,
#8
Quote by FatalGear41
those necks worked just fine for Jimmy Page, so it can be done.

those guitars had their necks sanded down dude.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#9
Quote by Skysc
*post*

First of all, he does not have a Les Paul Studio. Secondly, I really doubt that he would be pleased with an Agile after trying a Gibson LP Jr. I've been surprised a few times by some "middle level" guitars, for example Schecter and the ESP LTD 400 series.
Gear pics

Quote by Cathbard
Bugera cloning Blackstar is a scandal cloaked in a tragedy making love to a nightmare.

#10
Keep playing it for a month. If you're still not used to it by then either sand the neck down or sell it and buy either a Gibson with either the 60s or slim taper necks which are like Fender necks or change brands. PRS's wide-thin neck is similar to a Fender neck. ESP are a little bit thinner than Fender. Or just stick to Fender if you know that's the sort of neck you like.

Though I think it's interesting to point out that it was Fender that started the whole 'baseball bat neck' thing with their original Telecasters.
#11
Quote by gregs1020
those guitars had their necks sanded down dude.


Yes, but they didn't start that way. Page said in a number of interviews that he grew to like the fat necks just because he liked those two guitars so much. On "Number One" the middle of the neck was worn down from years of playing. It became noticeably thinner. Strangely, Gibson replicated this deformity in their first Page Signature model. They referred to it as "thick at the nut and at the heel, and thin in the middle." Weird.

I'm not sure when he planed the necks down. Hard to believe he'd do something so drastic to such valuable guitars. New tuners? Sure. But shave away some of the wood? Then again, I don't think he ever plans to sell them.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#12
Quote by FatalGear41
Yes, but they didn't start that way. Page said in a number of interviews that he grew to like the fat necks just because he liked those two guitars so much. On "Number One" the middle of the neck was worn down from years of playing. It became noticeably thinner. Strangely, Gibson replicated this deformity in their first Page Signature model. They referred to it as "thick at the nut and at the heel, and thin in the middle." Weird.

I'm not sure when he planed the necks down. Hard to believe he'd do something so drastic to such valuable guitars. New tuners? Sure. But shave away some of the wood? Then again, I don't think he ever plans to sell them.



He changed alot of things on those guitars.. I really doubt he ever thought of resale value.. But it is a fact that he did plane the necks, they are noticably thinner than normal gibson necks..
Current gear:
Fender Road Worn 60's Strat
Hohner SE35
Squier Classic Vibe 50's Tele
Yahama FG730S
Marshall Class 5
#13
Yeah, I've heard he had it done. I don't know who did the work. I just find it hard to believe he took a pair of Holy Grail 1950s CSB Les Pauls to some luthier and said "shave the necks and refinish them." The very thought of it would kill a lot of luthiers.

The two recent incarnations of his Signature Les Pauls are supposed to have thinner necks.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#14
Im not sure, but i dont think 59's were as rare in the early 70' as they are today :P Still though, i fully agree!
Current gear:
Fender Road Worn 60's Strat
Hohner SE35
Squier Classic Vibe 50's Tele
Yahama FG730S
Marshall Class 5
#15
Quote by FatalGear41
Yeah, I've heard he had it done. I don't know who did the work. I just find it hard to believe he took a pair of Holy Grail 1950s CSB Les Pauls to some luthier and said "shave the necks and refinish them." The very thought of it would kill a lot of luthiers.

The two recent incarnations of his Signature Les Pauls are supposed to have thinner necks.


Back then they were just a used a guitar. Nothing more. The holy garbage is nothing more then a ploy to part fools with a ton of cash.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#16
Quote by Tobyflyr
Im not sure, but i dont think 59's were as rare in the early 70' as they are today :P Still though, i fully agree!


Man, you have no idea! In 1977, you could buy a sweet '58 or '59 in 95+ percent condition for $3,500!!! Vintage guitar dealers would gladly do a search for you and they could always find one if you had the cash. Hell, as late as 1987, I saw a 1960 CSB Standard in 95+ condition for $10,000 in a shop outside of Washington, D.C. The only thing that had been replaced was the stopbar tailpiece.

If we only knew then what we know now....
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#17
Get the neck sanded down if you like everything else and don't mind killing the resale value one it.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray