#1
Can anyone give me any tips regarding how I can write in a style similar to Breaking Benjamin? Like what chord progressions to use, I'm trying to write a song, but I am not sure how to do it, like how many chords to use, when to use them, what chords to use, etc, its all pretty confusing at first, any help would be appreciated! Thanks!
#3
im not too familiar with the band itself but im assuming you know a few of their songs already just dissect those songs see what scales they are using, what chords, common progressions in their songs and take bits and peices from their writing style and try it yourself
#4
Quote by SargentCrunch
Can anyone give me any tips regarding how I can write in a style similar to Breaking Benjamin? Like what chord progressions to use, I'm trying to write a song, but I am not sure how to do it, like how many chords to use, when to use them, what chords to use, etc, its all pretty confusing at first, any help would be appreciated! Thanks!



Have you tried learning some of their songs?

That might give you an idea of what they use and how.

As far as writing like them, whats the point? They are them and you are you. I would suggest listening to and playing as much music as you can. Let your style develop, and then write how you write.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 13, 2011,
#5
there are no formulas

if it was that easy to write a good song, everyone would do it
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#6
I do agree with what everyone else says about "find your own style", etc, and that there is no formula.
However, there are some basic things Breaking Benjamin does that I'm sure you can find a way to make your own in your writing (they're one of my favorite bands, so that's how I got this).
Although it may not seem like it, they display quite a bit more metalcore influence than most other "post-grunge" bands. The drums are often very rhythmic with the guitars, much like in hardcore. The main riffs they often throw into their songs are based in Phrygian, or occasionally Locrian, relying heavily on the minor second scale degree to achieve a dark tonality. Another thing they combine this with is the speed of the riffs; they often move through scale positions relatively quickly. This is also coupled with slow, rhythmic drums for contrast. Verses often are the quieter parts of the song, and are usually based in natural minor. Choruses typically follow suit, but with heavier chords. I don't think I've ever heard any harmonic or melodic minor out of them. The chordal sections of their songs often rely on the motion from vi to IV, and IV to V or iii. Also, they almost always play in flat keys (Bb minor, Eb minor, F minor, C minor) and drop tune to Drop C or Bb.
#7
Wow thanks Nathaniel!! Thats exactly what I was looking for, good to see another huge Breaking Benjamin fan here! haha, I tried searching for Bb minor phrygian but can't seem to find the scale your talking about, could you maybe link me to a site with the scales on it? I want to start writing riffs haha thanks again
#8
Quote by SargentCrunch
Wow thanks Nathaniel!! Thats exactly what I was looking for, good to see another huge Breaking Benjamin fan here! haha, I tried searching for Bb minor phrygian but can't seem to find the scale your talking about, could you maybe link me to a site with the scales on it? I want to start writing riffs haha thanks again


After a quick listen to their stuff (being not overly familiar with their songs before), I'm unable to find this reliance on the b2 that Nathaniel referred to. I cannot find songs based in phrygian or locrian either.

What I do hear are relatively simple pop songs with lots of distortion and "attitude". No scale will help you write this. Do you know how to play chords? Learn some of their songs. They're based in minor keys generally.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
I'm learning chord theory now, so should I just stick to minor scales and chord progressions within that? Also I know what the scale degrees are but how do I know what order to play the chords in? Like which should come first i,iii,III,iv,v,VI,VII that has me confused, how do I know which order is musically 'correct', like Nathaniel said Breaking Benjamin goes VI to IV then to V or iii. Is that just a random order, or is there theory behind choosing the progression too?
#10
Theory only describes why it sounds the way it sounds. They weren't probably thinking of music theory when they wrote the chord progression, they probably just thought it sounded cool.

How many Breaking Benjamin songs do you know on the guitar? Can play completely off the top of your head?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
I can play 9-10 off the top of my head, I know some parts of others but would have to check the tab again to remember some of it.
#12
Quote by SargentCrunch
I can play 9-10 off the top of my head, I know some parts of others but would have to check the tab again to remember some of it.


Well just look at the ones you know and you should be able to put it together. Are you playing the full songs or just random riffs here and there?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Alan,
For the reliance on the b2, Fade Away has it, I Will Not Bow has it, Dance With The Devil has it. All in the "main riff" sections, not in the verses or chorus. The chord choices for these parts are based on a central tone that would imply Phrygian. I know there's all sorts of modal elitism on these forums, so even if I think I get it, someone's going to tell me I don't. So I suppose it's my bad for uttering the P and L words. But regardless, plenty of their songs have the b2 as a central tone. Not that they linger on them for a long time, but they use them with the tonic to create a darker tone than if they had just used natural minor.
#16
Can someone link me to the phrygian scale? I want to see the minor second scale degree your talking about.
#18
drop tuned minor key

really though, learn more than 9 or 10 songs. once you get to 20 or 30 you'll probably have it down.
#19
Thanks GuitarMunky, and z4twenny, well thanks everyone for taking the time to help me I'm gonna try to learn full albums by them, then like z4twenny said maybe I'll get it