#1
I told my friend i wrote a cool rift, and he asked, " Is it in 3/4?". What does that mean? i think it has to do with time signatures but i just kinda tapped my foot to get the rhythm of the riff.
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#2
ONE two three ONE two three
is 3/4
basic lesson in meter:
the bottom number is what beat gets the pulse (4=quarter note; 8= eighth note; etc)
the top number is how many per measure
so
4/4 is ONE two three four ONE two three four
3/4 is ONE two three ONE two three
etc
#3
Quote by Darkness in Zero
ONE two three ONE two three
is 3/4
basic lesson in meter:
the bottom number is what beat gets the pulse (4=quarter note; 8= eighth note; etc)
the top number is how many per measure
so
4/4 is ONE two three four ONE two three four
3/4 is ONE two three ONE two three
etc

what if i take rests in between certain notes wouldn't that mess up my meter?
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#5
No the meter keeps going. It could be like ONE (rest) three ONE two three or ONE (rest) (rest) ONE two three, If you see what im saying. Bascially the rest counts as a beat. You can rest anywhere you want as long as you can still count out: ONE two three, ONE two three.
#7
Quote by Sulfur183
No the meter keeps going. It could be like ONE (rest) three ONE two three or ONE (rest) (rest) ONE two three, If you see what im saying. Bascially the rest counts as a beat. You can rest anywhere you want as long as you can still count out: ONE two three, ONE two three.

Just because I sense possible confusion coming up...
Your riff...are all the notes the same duration? Because if not, I almost guarantee you are gonna get screwed up by all of our explanations...
If the note durations aren't all the same, then a "beat" isn't everytime you play a note...just wanna be clear on that. The "beat" is a constant, equal pulse in the music, as if you are tapping your foot to the music. Just wanted to mention that so you didn't come back like "Is my riff in 19?" lol
#8
Quote by Darkness in Zero
ONE two three ONE two three
is 3/4
:


Well... if we want to get technical, what your describing would be 3/2 timing. 3/4 timing would be...
ONE, two,three;One,two,three;One,two,three;One,two,three.
#9
Quote by Maximo33
Well... if we want to get technical, what your describing would be 3/2 timing. 3/4 timing would be...
ONE, two,three;One,two,three;One,two,three;One,two,three.

Wrong. The first number is the number of beats, the second is the kind of beat (quarter, eighth, sixteenth, etc.) It doesn't matter if you say One, two three 4 billion times, it wouldn't be 3/4 billion.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#10
Quote by Junior#1
Wrong. The first number is the number of beats, the second is the kind of beat (quarter, eighth, sixteenth, etc.) It doesn't matter if you say One, two three 4 billion times, it wouldn't be 3/4 billion.

Correct
The difference between 3/4 and 3/2 is whether you are counting quarter notes or half notes, and you can't tell that from "ONE two three"
soooooooooo
Assuming I am counting quarter notes:
ONE two three ONE two three
is 3/4
#11
Quote by Junior#1
Wrong. The first number is the number of beats, the second is the kind of beat (quarter, eighth, sixteenth, etc.) It doesn't matter if you say One, two three 4 billion times, it wouldn't be 3/4 billion.


I thought my Smiley face would have pointed out the fact I was kidding.

But I would like to know why he would automatically ask if it's in 3/4? Did you guys decide on writing in 3/4 ?or is that something he normally writes in? Just curious.