#1
How are minor sixth chords formed? I see that the Em6 chord has a C#. But the Em scale doesn't have a C#. Shouldn't the sixth note be a C? I am really confused.


Thanks,
Last edited by MaddMann274 at Dec 14, 2011,
#2
That's because you're not in E minor.

Also, try it with a C and B together. Yeah. Probably not what you're looking for.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Dec 14, 2011,
#3
Quote by MaddMann274
How are minor sixth chords formed? I see that the Em6 chord has a C#. But the Em scale doesn't have a C#. Shouldn't the sixth note be a C? I am really confused.


Thanks,

The "m" refers to the quality of the triad - it has no bearing on the sixth.
#4
Minor 6th = 1 b3 5 6

The chance of you encountering one though...not very likely, most of the time it will be a first inversion half diminished chord.

So learn your inversions and where/how they are used.
#5
The Em6 chord could be written in a few Key Signatures, D Major/B Minor or E Minor.

A Key Signature should be specific to the Tonic first and the harmony second...but you are ALWAYS at the mercy of transcriber...meaning...

Even if the Tonic was E, and the extended harmony contained a C# note, it would make the most musical sense to write it in the Key of E Minor and use an accidental for all of the C notes, making them C#'s instead. But, if someone wanted to keep the sheet free of accidentals they'd write it in the Key of D Major/B Minor, then all of the C notes are specified in the Key Signature as C# notes. Or some could even just write the whole thing in C Major/A Minor and add in any accidentals used.

Neither way is incorrect, but there is only one way that specifies the tonic note...and this
is what really tells you "what Key it's in"...and if E was the tonic, regardless of the extended harmony having a natural 6, the Key would be E Minor.

But regardless, it's up to the transcriber and how they want to portray it, but it's up to us as musician's to figure it out and use it.

Here's some forms of the Em6 chord:


Em6 chords

E--0--R
B--2--6
G--0--b3
D--2--R
A--2--5
E--0--R

E-(0)-R optional
B--2--6
G--4--5
D--2--R
A----
E--3--b3


E----
B--8--b3
G--6--6
D--5--b3
A--7--R
E----

more usable fragment of the chord above
E----
B--8--b3
G--6--6
D----
A--7--R
E----

One of the most common "block-type" form
E-(12)-R optional
B--12--5
G--12--b3
D--11--6
A----
E--12--R


A note about this last form, a little further application of the chords use...


Notice how this chord...

E------
B--12--5
G--12--b3
D--11--6
A------
E--12--R

is very similiar to this classic A9 form used in Blues and Rock all over the place:

E------
B--12--9
G--12--b7
D--11--M3
A--12--R
E------


In theory, the Em6 chord could be used as a A9/E chord, which in this form would be a

rootless A9 chord with the 5th in the bass (or E).

This idea is used all the time in dominant based music that alternated the Root and 5th,

like so...


E------------------------------------------
B------12------12------12------12------12--
G------12------12------12------12------12--
D------11------11------11------11------11--
A--12--------------12--------------12------etc...
E----------12--------------12--------------


So, many times you play a m6 form and it's not really a m6 chord, it's a 9th chord...and vice verse of course.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Dec 14, 2011,
#6
example

Gmi6 G Bb E D .. Could also be

C9 (no root) E Bb G D

Emi7b5 E G Bb D

learn the inversions and functions...this is a great multi-use chord with some very nice voicings

play well

wolf
#7
Quote by MaddMann274
How are minor sixth chords formed? I see that the Em6 chord has a C#. But the Em scale doesn't have a C#. Shouldn't the sixth note be a C? I am really confused.


Thanks,



Well, as you just discovered, a m6 chord doesn't exist as the i in a minor key. Try building a minor 6th from the 2nd step of the Major scale. For example in C Major, build a m6 from D.... D F A B
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by MaddMann274
How are minor sixth chords formed? I see that the Em6 chord has a C#. But the Em scale doesn't have a C#. Shouldn't the sixth note be a C? I am really confused.


Thanks,


That "Minor", in Em6 refers to the quality of there being a b3, not the 6. The b3 makes the triad minor, nothing else does.

It's based of a Maj 6th interval from E Major

E F# G# A B C# D# E. Note that the 6 is a C#. It's always based around a Major scale reference, and any alterations are voiced in terms of how the Major scale is changed, that's why we say that the E minor scale has a b3 b6 and b7 (natural minor, that is).

Best,

Sean
#10
Imagine a bass player slapping a low E, and you go... in a 16th note funk rhythm...
|-10-x-x-x-10-x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-8--x-x-x-8--x-x-x-8-x-x-8-x-8-x-x-|
|-9--x-x-x-9--x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-9--x-x-x-9--x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-----------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------|

Yeah buddy. Whenever you see a minor triad, or m7 in this case, just add the 6th or replace the 7th with a 6th respectively.
#11
Quote by mdc
Imagine a bass player slapping a low E, and you go... in a 16th note funk rhythm...
|-10-x-x-x-10-x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-8--x-x-x-8--x-x-x-8-x-x-8-x-8-x-x-|
|-9--x-x-x-9--x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-9--x-x-x-9--x-x-x-9-x-x-9-x-9-x-x-|
|-----------------------------------|
|-----------------------------------|

Yeah buddy. Whenever you see a minor triad, or m7 in this case, just add the 6th or replace the 7th with a 6th respectively.


Yep, a very pleasing musical cliche in funk.
#12
Used in pop as well.

Bee Gees - How Deep Is Your Love

Chorus

Eb - Ebmaj7 - Abmaj7 - Abm6
#13
Quote by Brainpolice2
It's perfect if you're doing an E dorian kind of thing. Otherwise, as others said, you'll most likely find it as an extended IV chord, or an inversion of the half-diminished ii chord.


Or a melodic minor like a lot of gypsy jazz does.