#1
Guitar amps' sound nowadays is being differentiated into two categories: modern and vintage. What was the point when that change occured, when a newer sound emerged putting everything that's before it into a vintage category? What were the first amplifiers that brought the "modern" sound?

Second, I feel the difference between vintage and modern sound, but what are those characteristic specifically that make sound "modern" or "vintage" in an amp?


By the way, I am asking this out of curiosity, just to understand more about those things.
Last edited by andriusd at Dec 14, 2011,
#2
1.) It was a gradual shift
2.) Lots of people will credit Randall Smith of Mesa Boogie for helping to define and push the 'modern' tone in lots of his amps.
3.) Modern will sound smoother, have more low end and be articulate - although that last item isn't really a characteristic of modern only.

That is just my quick take. I'm sure someone will have a better explanation.



good thread idea actually


v.... personally, I think Eddie helped define characteristics of modern guitar playing but his tone was still pretty vintage sounding to me up until maybe Diver Down or 1984. I thought this was about maps?
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Dec 14, 2011,
#3
I like to drawn the line somewhere along the late 70's, namely to Eddie Van Halen, along with Van Halen's first album in 1978.
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#6
nineteen eighty... three?

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#7
I agree with the^ unforgiven, mid to late 70s but then there is" Bonamssa"
#8
Quote by AcousticMirror
when the high gain cascade preamp was invented.

I'm no tech so I don't completely understand this, but this was always my assumption. To me modern versus vintage is preamp versus poweramp distortion.
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#9
I'd have to go with Van Halen 1 and the 5150.
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#11
Quote by Cathbard
I'd have to go with Van Halen 1 and the 5150.


That's what I was thinking. The 5150 seems like it would have been a big part in the "modern" sound considering its predecessor is recommended in at least two threads daily on here for modern metal. Mesa makes sense as a factor as well. I mean, how many Mesas are there that can easily cover anything considered "modern"?
#12
what i wanna know is how much of the 'divide' between vintage and modern tones is related to the changes in recording technology.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#15
Quote by Cathbard
I'd have to go with Van Halen 1 and the 5150.

no.
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#17
Am I wrong in thinking that Joe Bonamsa is old School
please have a look on youtub the 70s are back!!!!!!!
Last edited by duncers at Dec 14, 2011,
#19
Van Halen

Arguably Tony Iommi

/thread
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#21
Quote by Blktiger0
Mesa makes sense as a factor as well. I mean, how many Mesas are there that can easily cover anything considered "modern"?


Do you mean that there are not much such Mesas or the opposite of that?