#1
Yeah, recently I spent a lot of time learning more about the major scale, the minor scale and using them in a modal sense. Left my blues and jazz playing at the level of pentatonics and pentatonics alone.

Went to a rock and blues jam session last night, I felt so basic!
I was playing a sound that sounding almost the same every song and my creativity was a bit sapped.

To sum up, what other scales should I learn, to combine with pentatonics, in order to play along with a blues and jazz jam? What scales also sound bluesy and would fit within this spec.?

Thank you,

DrOctv.
#2
well, for blues just add some passing tones and call it good, for jazz however look at the chord that your playing over at the time and play the mode relative to said mode, paying special attention to chord tones, then change mode with each subsequent chord, it's a bit more difficult but if you get the hang of it you'll sound like one hell of a jazz player
#3
Extensions. All about extensions.

When you see a Cmaj7, You have to be able to think C-E-G-B, but also D-F#-A and how they work with the chord. If you have, say, an Fmaj7 chord, you can center around an Am7 arpeggio and you'll be killing it
#4
Quote by Bad Kharmel
well, for blues just add some passing tones and call it good, for jazz however look at the chord that your playing over at the time and play the mode relative to said mode, paying special attention to chord tones, then change mode with each subsequent chord, it's a bit more difficult but if you get the hang of it you'll sound like one hell of a jazz player


Passing tones? ... are those, like, mode-relevant-but-outside-of-the-pentatonic notes? Haha, I'm kind of a guitar fool. I had been playing for 6 years without learning any theory, now that I've learnt theory, I've realised how helpful it is! But thanks for the jazz tip, that really opened my eyes. I'ma start practicing with my rhythm guitarist as soon as possible.
#5
Quote by Bad Kharmel
well, for blues just add some passing tones and call it good, for jazz however look at the chord that your playing over at the time and play the mode relative to said mode, paying special attention to chord tones, then change mode with each subsequent chord, it's a bit more difficult but if you get the hang of it you'll sound like one hell of a jazz player


academically correct.

historically and practically incorrect.

learn melodies and solos and changes by ear. know all your chords. and play. if you internalize the melody of a given tune, you can't really go wrong.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx1JsuT4
#DTWD
#6
Quote by primusfan
academically correct.

historically and practically incorrect.

learn melodies and solos and changes by ear. know all your chords. and play. if you internalize the melody of a given tune, you can't really go wrong.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx1JsuT4


I'm guessing this is Hal Garper I am quoting?
#7
Quote by Doctor Octave
I'm guessing this is Hal Garper I am quoting?


the video is hal galper, yes. why? obviously i share his sentiments, otherwise i wouldn't have posted it ...
#DTWD
#8
you might find this to be slightly more practical.

t inyurl.com/7aa3ukx

EDIT: wtf? goddamn adbots getting tinyurl blocked.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 16, 2011,
#9
Quote by primusfan
the video is hal galper, yes. why? obviously i share his sentiments, otherwise i wouldn't have posted it ...


I meant it quite literally... as you in you being Hal Garper... assuming things... It was a joke, obviously didn't quite land.

And I do agree with a lot of things he says, but he is wronging a style of playing that is enjoyed subjectively by a lot of peple and he's putting a restriction on the entire dynamic. I agree with "people wanting to hear melodic things more often" and what-not, but you should never believe that is an objective truth. I wouldn't go as far to say he is talking bullshit though.
#10
Quote by Doctor Octave

Went to a rock and blues jam session last night, I felt so basic!
I was playing a sound that sounding almost the same every song and my creativity was a bit sapped.

To sum up, what other scales should I learn, to combine with pentatonics, in order to play along with a blues and jazz jam? What scales also sound bluesy and would fit within this spec.?

Thank you,

DrOctv.


Mixolydian scales over the respective chord changes
Study the pentatonic approaches of players like B.B. King, Freddie King, Albert King, Jimmy Rogers, Eddie Taylor, Otis Rush, Buddy Guy (early stuff, at start of their career is usually best)
Have an appreciation for tone and rhythmic nuance.. it's the little things that make you sound unique and less pedestrian. Work on how you approach notes and pick them, try a less is more approach and work your way up. Try to experiment with the rhythm of your phrasing
#11
think more jazz like but don't play more jazz like. Also T-Bones a good one to listen to and steal ideas off