#1
Apologies if this is in the wrong thread, it's to do with gear so here it goes.

Got myself an SM57 the other day along with a Peavey mixer. I intended to buy an SM57 & an SM58 & a low end mixer, but I went with a higher quality mixer and therefore could not afford the SM58 vocal mic.

I've not tried playing/recording vocals through my SM57, but once it's compared I know the SM58 will be a huge difference, or so the guitar store guy told me.

Anyway, what can I do to my SM57 to make it better for vocals? Can I add a filter, if so what do people suggest etc?

Any advice greatly appreciated, thanks
#2
Hmm, i'd imagine this thread would be better in the recording section so might ask a mod to move it?

As far as your question goes my answer has a few questions in it. How are you recording? What audio interface? What software? When recording the vocals through THAT mic (which isnt the best mic for vocals) you will want to get right up on it. might even turn it a little off axis. Then you will need to EQ it and de-ess in your software to taste..

I havent tried them out but there are "clone" versions of the 58 as well as some decent condensor mic's to be had out there especially if your willing to go used..
#3
I'm using a Peavey PV8 USB Mixer. I'll use it to record into Reaper, I got the mixer as opposed to an audio interface cause I'm gonna be using it live and I have an outdated PA system.

I just want to know what I can do to the SM57, which is an instrument mic, to make it better for vocals until I can get myself a good vocal mic such as an SM58. EQ'ing isn't a problem for me I think I'm pretty good at setting up tones. Just wondering if adding say a pop filter would help it much?
#4
There won't be a huge difference. That's BS. SM57 are great mics, they just don't have a pop shield grille like a 58. Supposedly the 57 and 58 capsules are the same. In the studio a 57 and a pop shield will do just fine - they cost about $20 and are essential studio kit for any vocal mic.

Ultimately I consider the 58 a great live vocal mic and the 57 a great multipurpose studio mic.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#5
What about other vocal microphones, in the same price range as the SM58 that anyone can suggest looking at?
#6
What do you want to use it for? Studio, live or both?
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#7
Quote by Dilberto
What do you want to use it for? Studio, live or both?


Both
#8
Well there're haters that will knock the 58 but when you see top bands using them I see no reason to use anything else - I have a couple. If I had to rely on one just one mic, it'd be the 58 but it doesn't get used for recording as I use condensor mics for vocals.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#9
Quote by Dilberto
Well there're haters that will knock the 58 but when you see top bands using them I see no reason to use anything else - I have a couple. If I had to rely on one just one mic, it'd be the 58 but it doesn't get used for recording as I use condensor mics for vocals.


Would you say they're better? How does the tone vary from a condenser to a non-condenser?
#10
their the same mic.

the sm58/57 is only a good live vocal mic.

it's far from a good vocal studio mic.

it's a good live and recording guitar cab mic though.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#11
Quote by AcousticMirror
their the same mic.

the sm58/57 is only a good live vocal mic.

it's far from a good vocal studio mic.

it's a good live and recording guitar cab mic though.



Aye, I was just wondering what I could do it to make it more suitable for vocals for a temporary amount of time
#12
Quote by AJScott
Would you say they're better? How does the tone vary from a condenser to a non-condenser?


There are great studio vocal dynamic mics, however at the price point of a 58 a condensor mic will generally sound more open and with a fuller bottom end. In essence, the way in which a 58 prevents feedback and helps cut through in a live mix means they are coloured and often sound boxy in a studio.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#13
Quote by AJScott
Aye, I was just wondering what I could do it to make it more suitable for vocals for a temporary amount of time


Live, nothing. Studio, as already stated you need a pop shield.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#14
Quote by AJScott
Aye, I was just wondering what I could do it to make it more suitable for vocals for a temporary amount of time


nothing. there's no difference between the two mics you just use them for whatever.

there really aren't any good budget vocal mics.

the sm57/58 will get the job done.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#15
An SM57 works fine for vocals. Just ask Lemmy:



They also work well for vocals on this guy's podium:

"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley