#1
hey! does anyone know what's the output of the pickups for a fender precision standard? is it 100k? 150k? 200k?

i bought some dimarzio pickups (dp127) that are 250k i was wondering if the trademark sound and amplitude (volume) of my bass will change drastically?

any help would be greatly appreciated!
cheers!!!

Originally Posted by anonymus
I voted "evolutionism", though. Cuz you know... it's sciencey.



Originally Posted by anonymus
We were all created by God...
As Monkeys...
Then evolved.
End Debate.
__________
#2
250k???? re-read the ad:

Wiring: 4 Conductor
Magnet: Ceramic
Output mV: 250
DC Resistance: 19.16 Kohm <<<<<<<< 19k will be a nice hot output
Year of Introduction: 1992
Patent: 4,501,185
#4
Ö oh im sorry, i got confused, you're right guys, i meant the output
are 250 mv, so i'm guessing the precision is pretty much the same.... do you think it'll change the sound dramatically? maybe even enhance it?

thnx a lot

Originally Posted by anonymus
I voted "evolutionism", though. Cuz you know... it's sciencey.



Originally Posted by anonymus
We were all created by God...
As Monkeys...
Then evolved.
End Debate.
__________
#5
"Enhancing" of the sound is really down to your preferences. As has already been mentioned at 19k it's going to have a fair bit more output (probably, I don't know what you're using now) than the pickup you're replacing and therefor the bass itself will be louder. I can't tell you if you're going to like it or not.
#6
I had a set of those laying around for a couple years and tossed it in this modded unit..did it change the sound? sure did. did it help the output?, sure did. will you like the change? I don't know. I also added a preamp to this bass so any "trebly" output could be killed off, and any "lack of bass" could be added in. do I like it overall? sure do.


.
#7
DC Resistance isn't an indication of output, just of the amount of wire coiled around the poles.
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#8
250 k pots are what fender uses for single coil pickups in strats, tele's, J-bass, P-bass, ect.
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#9
thanx a lot guys, it helped me quite a bit. and i will definitely try them out.

Originally Posted by anonymus
I voted "evolutionism", though. Cuz you know... it's sciencey.



Originally Posted by anonymus
We were all created by God...
As Monkeys...
Then evolved.
End Debate.
__________
#10
A little bit more enlightenment and correction of the wrong statements:
Each split coil PU of a Fender American Standard Precision Bass, also the vintage ones will read between 5,1 k and 5,7k on an Ohms-meter, so that you get a DC-resistance in sum between 10,2k and 11,4kOhms. These are realistic values.
@nutter_101: you're only half - of course is the DC-resistance of any coil an indication for its AC-output! The law of induction says that within an induction-system a moving conductor wire is generating a voltage in or out of a coil, this voltage is the higher the higher the quantity of the coil's windings are!!!
But simultaneously the treble will decrease severely correlating with the number of windings.
It maybe that the DC-resistance will be much more higher only at PU used for basses with active electronics.
For the sake of completeness here are some values of the single coil pickups for Fender Jazz basses
Standard-PUs:
Neck (3,20H): 7,25 kOhms
Bridge (3,35 H): 7,50 kOhms

Custom shop 60's Jazz bass:
Neck (3,18H): 7,1 kOhms
Bridge (3,25 H): 7,4 kOhms

Original Fender 1964 Jazz bass:
Neck : 7,65 kOhms
Bridge: 8,06 kOhms

and the strongest I ever got in my hands were an original pair of 1962 PUs:
Neck : 8,04 kOhms
Bridge: 9,20 kOhms
In spite of this high values the sound wasn't muffled at all...
#11
But also DC-resistance will vary based on the resistivity of the wire used. By increasing tension while winding, the wire will get thinner, increasing the resistance. Also, not all companies use the same gauge of wire in the first place, further increasing the difficulty in using DCR as an example of output.

Also, temperature alters DC-resistance.

All I am saying is that DC resistance is not a good way of getting an idea of output, there are too many variables which will effect it.

You're better of trying to listen to a sound clip at the end of the day. Pickup companies count the coils of wire, not the DC-resistance of the pickup. Coils don't change, DC-resistance does.
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Last edited by Nutter_101 at Dec 17, 2011,