#1
Lately ive been able to play solos and riffs out of hearing, but i get to a rough patch when i try to play chords out of hearing. Should i just wait for my hearing to improve or im just doing something wrong?
#3
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Try transcribing simple 2-3 chord songs and then compare them with tabs\sheet music to see how well you've done.

It is pretty easy to do... just sit down with a pop song and try transcribing it then compare, try another song, compare and so on until you consistently get the right chords
Quote by Tyson2011
when in doubt, adjust the truss rod.

Sfedf the First ...
or should it be the insane?
#5
If you can transcribe single note stuff by ear that's good.

Work on identifying melodic intervals, followed by harmonic intervals (double stops). The next stage after that would be triads.

Basically you're developing your ear to recognize separate pitches, followed by two simultaneously, followed by three.

It takes time.
#6
try to listen for the bass. the note that the bass plays is typically the root of the current chord. when i try to find out chord progressions, I go into the mixer in windows media player (or winamp) and turn the treble down and the bass up.
find out what key the song is in. if the bass is playing a C in a song thats in A minor, its probably a C major chord. If the bass is playing a C in a song thats in Bb major, its probably a C minor chord.
Go here and click on scales to chords to get all typical diatonic chords in any key or mode.
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

eventually, youll know what certain chord voicings sound like and youll know what chords in a certain key are major or minor, then you wont need that site anymore. doing this stuff all trhough high school made Aural class in college really easy. Made theory pretty easy too.
Last edited by ciano16 at Dec 15, 2011,
#7
Quote by mdc
If you can transcribe single note stuff by ear that's good.

Work on identifying melodic intervals, followed by harmonic intervals (double stops). The next stage after that would be triads.

Basically you're developing your ear to recognize separate pitches, followed by two simultaneously, followed by three.

It takes time.



Hurr durr?

Can you simplify what youve said?
#9
Quote by Standarduser
Hurr durr?

Can you simplify what youve said?

Melodic intervals are two notes played separately.

Harmonic intervals are two notes played together, which can be a little more tricky on the ear. So it's good to become really familiar with melodic ones first.

There are simple and compound intervals. Simple are within an octave. Compound are greater than octave.
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-
-2
-
-
-3

Is a major 9, not a major second.

Having said that, there's no shortcut to getting good at this stuff. Admittedly, some have better ears than others, and some have to work a bit harder. No big deal.

The other posts in this thread are typical answers, but I can tell you right off the bat that they are the best answers.

Also, this is how I did it. Post 4.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=28703309#post28703309
#10
One technique is to change the chord into an arpeggio in your mind - hear the tones of the chord distinctly, and identify them.