#1
I sorta understand the minor and major pentatonic scales. From my understanding, a scale goes like a step, half step, half step, step, half step. And that if you were start at one note, 12 frets away, is the same note in a higher octave. So, I kinda get it. And I was trying to understand the blues scale but I dont really understand what "rules" make it what it is.
Im really not literate in music theory, so I cant understand the stuff im reading online.
And the Music theory FAQ thread doesnt have what im looking for.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
Last edited by Iblis92 at Dec 16, 2011,
#2
Not gonna happen mate. At least not now anyway. Just learn the shape and have fun jamming.
#4
Quote by Iblis92
I sorta understand the minor and major pentatonic scales. From my understanding, a scale goes like a step, half step, half step, step, half step. And that if you were start at one note, 12 frets away, is the same note in a higher octave. So, I kinda get it. And I was trying to understand the blues scale but I dont really understand what "rules" make it what it is.
Im really not literate in music theory, so I cant understand the stuff im reading online.
And the Music theory FAQ thread doesnt have what im looking for.

mdc is right - you pretty much asked the musical equivalent of "i'd like understand how gerunds and the present participle work, but i'm not really literate in english grammar"

Fact of the matter is there's no shortcuts, if you want to understand things then you need to do the groundwork and learn the basics - you can't try to jump into the middle, you've got to learn from the ground up and give yourself a proper foundation. If you understand the basics of theory then you'll understand every scale, if you don't then you won't understand any of them.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#5
Theres so much stuff to learn, and its all really ambiguous to me. I dont really understand what the foundation is.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#6
i really suggest you get a music theory or a guitar beginner book. these usually explain these basics in a pretty clear and understandable way.

in fact buy more than one. getting this information from multiple sources helped me understand it better.
Quote by psyks
You are filthy.
#8
Quote by Slashiepie
Again, this is a good start
its written incredibly well and freindly to new musicians.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_i.html


Allrite, well ill give it a thorough reading. I HOPE that it makes sense. music theory is like ****ing quantum physics to me.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#9
Quote by Iblis92
Theres so much stuff to learn, and its all really ambiguous to me. I dont really understand what the foundation is.

Start with learning where the notes are on your fretboard.
Then learn about intervals
Then learn how to construct and harmonise the major scale.

The major scale is the cornerstone of western music theory, everything else you'll learn is either directly connected to it or can be describesd in relation to it. Those articles Slashiepie has linked you to will get you on the right track but remember this is a learning process, it's not simply a case of reading 10 articles then *bam* you know everything, you have to take time absorbing the information and working with it to ensure you actually understand it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Allright. Thanks for the info and help. I read the first part, looks promising. Hope it delivered.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#11
what the bird-lover said about the learning process is really important. don't rush it, take your time and learn small pieces at a time or it gets really confusing really fast
Quote by psyks
You are filthy.
#12
Quote by mdc
Just learn the shape and have fun jamming.


+1
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#13
Quote by vince1991
what the bird-lover said



Anyway, I recently taken a shine to m2 dissonance after listening to The Road Less Travelled. There's a few versions, I'm talking Mattias IA Eklundh.

Not that it's a blues album, but yeah, my double stops have slowly morphed in to the odd m2 every now and then.
#15
Quote by Iblis92
I sorta understand the minor and major pentatonic scales. From my understanding, a scale goes like a step, half step, half step, step, half step. And that if you were start at one note, 12 frets away, is the same note in a higher octave. So, I kinda get it. And I was trying to understand the blues scale but I dont really understand what "rules" make it what it is.
Im really not literate in music theory, so I cant understand the stuff im reading online.
And the Music theory FAQ thread doesnt have what im looking for.


Hey,

I feel for you, but this is both the right way, and the painful way to go about understanding theory (teaching yourself)

Basically the blues scales incorporate something called a tritone. This note is exactly halfway between the Root and the octave of that root. Because of its distance halfway it produces a very off sounding tone, that creates a lot of tension. That note referred to some, as the "blue note" is used as a passing tone to create the tension/release feeling in the scale, which we identify as "blues". Its tremendously expressful, and the trick of the blues note is use it like a subtle flavoring of the notes, dont just sit on it or you'll come to appreciate how tense it makes everything sound.

By the way, you mentioned being frustrated, and lost when trying to work out everything. Have you ever considered private lessons for music theory, that could be specifically applied to the guitar? Going it alone can take ages, but you do have options out there. For instance many places have a guitar instructor or two that might be able to help you on a one on one basis.

If you dont have access to local private instruction, face to face, here's another thought. We teach it online, and if you're interested or have questions, or would even like a course catalog of what all we teach etc, just send me a PM. Weve been doing this online now, going into our 3rd year, and in person for almost a decade.

We don't advertise, so the only place you'd learn of us is through this forum, but weve helped hundreds around the world.

Lastly if you simply cannot afford a one on one or specific online theory course, or like many, don't want to pay for anything....take a look at Mike Dodges website. Mikes a very capable teacher and hes put a lot of material, that you can try and see if self study helps. The main thing on that is hopefully you're understanding everything right. It can be very hard to teach yourself, but you know many here over the course of a few years eventually manage to do just that.

Hope this helps, and good luck!

Best,

Sean
#16
Quote by Iblis92
I sorta understand the minor and major pentatonic scales. From my understanding, a scale goes like a step, half step, half step, step, half step. And that if you were start at one note, 12 frets away, is the same note in a higher octave. So, I kinda get it. And I was trying to understand the blues scale but I dont really understand what "rules" make it what it is.
Im really not literate in music theory, so I cant understand the stuff im reading online.
And the Music theory FAQ thread doesnt have what im looking for.



The blues scale is essentially just a scale with one note added into the minor pentatonic shape. You are adding the flatted fifth or raised 4th, whatever you want to call it and it is known as the blue notes. When you pass through this note in the scale it adds a bluesy sound. I don't know what you mean by "rules" , but it is just a very simple scale really.