#1
What are the best methods to go about achieving this...



This is a picture of a replica of John Mayer's BLK1 Strat neck.
#2
That just looks like some good old fashioned wear. But the surefire way of getting rid of a finish is to sand it off. Just make sure you put some tung oil on it afterwards to make sure you seal the wood so it doesn't warp.
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#3
That actually is not natural wear. This was done by a few guys that do custom relicing for people. I just want that without paying like 300 bucks to have it done when I can do it myself. It seems like a no brainer, but there has to be more to it like you said sealing it after sanding and stuff.
#4
Sanding poly is always a bad idea unless it's a thin coat in the 5-10/1000ths range. Stripper/heat gun is the sure fire way of getting it off.
#5
start with a scraper, then sand papers starting at 120 or so.
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#6
Get sanding. I do it on my Strats.
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#7
Skip the sanding! Use a chemical stripper, you'll save hours of tedious elbow-grease-depleting labor. I've used chemical strippers many times, and they are MUCH faster and easier to use than sandpaper.
#9
Do you really want unfinished maple? It will get dirty very quickly and you risk the wood warping.




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#10
Quote by dazza027
...until you get some on the body... doh


It's a strat? He can just take the neck off while he's working?


Quote by Absent Mind
Do you really want unfinished maple? It will get dirty very quickly and you risk the wood warping.


He can just tung or tru-oil finish it to avoid those issues.
#11
Quote by lumberjack
It's a strat? He can just take the neck off while he's working?


He can just tung or tru-oil finish it to avoid those issues.

Agreed, just take the neck off and chemical stip it
#13
Orbital sander and 120 grit will do the job in under an hour, be careful not to alter the neck carve though.
#14
Quote by lumberjack
Skip the sanding! Use a chemical stripper, you'll save hours of tedious elbow-grease-depleting labor. I've used chemical strippers many times, and they are MUCH faster and easier to use than sandpaper.


there is even non toxic stripper these days.

listen to this guy, if you want to save valuable time and money.
#16
Quote by Wisthekiller
Do you want the look or the feel?


I want the feel. I was fortunate enough to play one of the 83 Masterbuilt BLACK1 John Mayer strats. Getting to notes is like effortless. One of the guys above said it gets dirty. I don't think it would get any dirtier than when it was polyurethaned. Especially after sealing the raw wood after sanding.
#18
Quote by Becker Guitars
Orbital sander and 120 grit will do the job in under an hour, be careful not to alter the neck carve though.


120 grit ok.. but I wouldn't use an orbital... you'll make flat or irregular spots..
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#19
Quote by Papabear505
120 grit ok.. but I wouldn't use an orbital... you'll make flat or irregular spots..
JMHO


You have to work the curve of the neck. It's not too difficult, I just had to do this the other day actually. I might not recommend it to someone who hasn't done lots of work with an orbital or sanding necks though. Main reasons I suggested it are that it is much fast than hand sanding and you don't have to purchase/work with chemical strippers.
#20
Quote by Wisthekiller
If you want the feel just get some #000 or #0000 steel wool and scrape it down to satin. It'll be close enough.

This could work, just make sure the neck is off the body to prevent steel wool filings from working their way into the pickup coils.
#21
Quote by Absent Mind
Do you really want unfinished maple? It will get dirty very quickly and you risk the wood warping.


The most common wood used in custom billiard cue shafts is hard maple and those are often unfinished. Granted, cue is not under the kind of tension that a tuned guitar is, but I have a pool cue that is over 20 years old and it hasn't warped yet and that comes with using it to break the rack and masse' on occasion.

Yes, the cue shaft does get dirty from body oils, billiard chalk, and the odd spilled pint but a coarse Scotch-Brite pad takes care of that.

(Upside of the Scotch-Brite pads is no metal bits to get stuck to magnets.)

Interestingly enough, the ordinary one piece house billiard cues have a lacquered finish and players often use hand chalk or talcum powder to reduce friction.

As for whether a guitar neck is better finished or unfinished, I'll leave that to a luthier opinion to say and up to the preference of the player.

I have played both and honestly, I like the feel of an unfinished neck, especially thick necks.
#22
I do this on my epi les paul necks. DO NOT STRIP IT WITH CHEMICALS!!! you're gonna create more trouble than it's worth. If you're going for how it's done at the factory, then sand it down with 400gt, clean it up with wax and grease remover, and spray the neck with satin nitro. Poly is very hard to remove and you simply don't need to remove all of it, You just need to prep the surface to receive the satin clearcoat. Nothing to it.