#1
Hello guys!

I just got my new laptop which I'll use for various things, including audio recording.

Now, I have a M-Audio Fast Track Pro, and I was wondering how I'll use it to get sound in REAPER. You can eliminate the option of micing it, because I really can't do it here, at home. I have a Marshall tube amp, and it has a pre-amp out line, do I connect that to the Fast Track Pro (I'll keep the speakers connected to the pre-amp, of course)? And then use a speaker simulator and impulse response?

Thanks!
#3
Thanks for the link, although it wasn't what I was looking for, really. I'll check the REAPER forums for more info. Cheers!
#4
Scrap that, I'm micing the amp. It's just too good to be thrown aside and being simulated by some VSTs.

I'd be thankful if anyone could give me ANY tips regarding micing the amp and mixing stuff.

Also, when you guys say "pan one rhythm track to the left, other to the right", do you actually mean creating 2 tracks, one of course panned to the left and one to the right, both being armed and using the same input from my interface?

Thanks!
#5
Quote by BMusic
Scrap that, I'm micing the amp. It's just too good to be thrown aside and being simulated by some VSTs.

I'd be thankful if anyone could give me ANY tips regarding micing the amp and mixing stuff.

Also, when you guys say "pan one rhythm track to the left, other to the right", do you actually mean creating 2 tracks, one of course panned to the left and one to the right, both being armed and using the same input from my interface?

Thanks!

It means you need to record 2 tracks of the same thing and pan them left and right (around 96/97% works well). You don't record the tracks simultaneously though. The little nuances and differences in each take are what makes it sound fatter.
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#6
Quote by Twistedrock
It means you need to record 2 tracks of the same thing and pan them left and right (around 96/97% works well). You don't record the tracks simultaneously though. The little nuances and differences in each take are what makes it sound fatter.

Thanks man, that's what I wanted to hear.