#1
But first a little background. I've been lurking on this forum for a few years now.
So thanks to everyone on here for all the knowledge I've learned, from the forums to the lessons etc.

I've played acoustic for 3-4 years now. Played in a country band for a year or so. Mostly just rhythm with open chords, some barre chords etc.
I don't know much theory other than the basic intervals. I've messed around a little with some of the pentatonic scale shapes, and improvising over backing tracks.

Anyhow to make a long story short, I just bought a MIM Fender Tele and would like to start playing electric more. I've figured out so far to quit mashing the chords on the frets like I'm playing an acoustic cause it keeps sharpening up all the notes.
I've also found out that when strumming, I dont need to use the same big sweeping strums like I play on the acoustic, or if I do, then i need to learn to mute some of the strings. Cause with the amp I can hear alot of notes ringing out that sound bad.

So anyways sorry for the rambling. I guess what I'm saying is although I'm not new, I am new to this. And I am drawing a blank on where exactly to start this new journey to become better faster . Anyone been here before, or can suggest what I should focus on first? Any tips? Practice routines?

I like all genres of music but country and rock are what I'd like to become good at. Both rhythm and lead. Thanks All!!!
#2
Seems you're a solid rythym player, maybe a direction for you to go in is lead. Maybe do some mixing and add your acoustic stuff in?

I'm not much of a country/blues guy but as always, scales. Learn scales and shapes and remember what scale is in what key. If you plan to become faster play to a metronome, play a scale over a beat and the next day you do it play the same thing just faster. That's a good way of increasing speed.
#4
i play both acoustic and electric, i picked them up at around the same time, and it sounds like your on the right track. im a big fan of barre chords especially with the gain turned up, mostly due to being a fan of placebo, but like AJ says if you wanna get faster your best following the lead route and practicing alternative picking with a metronome. good luck man!
#5
Yeah lead is the direction I'd like to go. As for scales, should I start with the major and minor? The only scale I've ever messed with is the first 2 or 3 shapes of the pentatonic, in a minor.
#6
dude just start learning the lead parts to easy rock songs and then gradually build up from there. you probaly have pretty good rythem so use a metronome if you want to, but it cant hurt you. cheers.
#8
Quote by Zeletros
Don't learn scales.


Learn solos.

same thing
he of tranquil mind
#9
Quote by Zeletros
Don't learn scales.




That's the other thread
And after reading it, I'm even more confused lol.

So maybe i'll start with a combination of scales and learning some easy riffs and leads from other songs.
#10
Quote by SouthFL79
...

Anyhow to make a long story short, I just bought a MIM Fender Tele and would like to start playing electric more. I've figured out so far to quit mashing the chords on the frets like I'm playing an acoustic cause it keeps sharpening up all the notes.
I've also found out that when strumming, I dont need to use the same big sweeping strums like I play on the acoustic, or if I do, then i need to learn to mute some of the strings. Cause with the amp I can hear alot of notes ringing out that sound bad.

...

I like all genres of music but country and rock are what I'd like to become good at. Both rhythm and lead. Thanks All!!!


I usually prefer practicing, writing and usually learning new songs on the acoustic. It's great for finger strength and I figure if you can do pull-offs, hammer-ons, bends, legato, slides and all that fun stuff on acoustic, it is way more satisfying and easier on the electric.

You definitely don't want to strangle your Tele. It might take some time to get the feel of the guitar and not pressing too hard. You could try thicker strings. On my old Peavey Patriot I use D'Addario .11's. On my Strat I use .09's but I set the intonation ever so slightly on the flat side so when I finger normally it is right on.

Definitely tighten up your strumming. Let the guitar and the amp do the work for you. Will help you in the long run on the acoustic also. Especially, if you get into something like bluegrass and you need to go from cords to licks and back real fast.

And yes muting strings is a must. I use my thumb to mute the low E on open D and A cords and the like. You can use your fretting fingers to get other strings. Of course, tighter, more accurate strumming with use of your palm on your picking hand.

As far as practice, play what you know first and get it to sound good (re-evaluate your technique), then move on from there. Scales, though can be boring, are good despite the other post. You have to "know the rules before you can break them" so-to-speak.
#11
Quote by fishmike
same thing



Absolutely, ABSOLUTELY not.


There's no point in learning scales for him as he will find little use of them at this moment