#1
can Anyone explain (in as much detail possible) what the following are and how they compare to one another? (pedals

1. distortion
2. fuzz
3. boost
4. overdrive
5. tube screamer
6. drive
7. gain

Mch appreitiation to those who know... thanx!
#2
Quote by jumpnjax
can Anyone explain (in as much detail possible) what the following are and how they compare to one another? (pedals

1. distortion
2. fuzz
3. boost
4. overdrive
5. tube screamer
6. drive
7. gain

Mch appreitiation to those who know... thanx!


Distortion pedals are usually designed to be used In front of a clean amp, if you don't like your amps natural distortion.

Fuzz is a thicker more juicy type of distortion.

A boost pedal is supposed to be used to add more gain to an amp that's already breaking up.

Overdrive pedals have less gain than distortion pedals and can be used either in front of an amp's clean channel, or in front of it's lead channel.

The tube screamer pedal is a famous overdrive/boost pedal

Drive and gain are usually controls found on distortion and overdrive pedals to controll how much distortion is coming from the pedal itself.

Hope that helps.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
Last edited by kutless999 at Dec 16, 2011,
#3
Quote by kutless999
Drive and gain are usually controls found on distortion and overdrive pedals to control how much distortion is coming from the pedal itself.


Fixed it for you. Otherwise pretty accurate except I would say a fuzz is a harsher type of distortion traditionally. The Muff is the exception and is not as harsh as the traditional fuzz like a fuzz face.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#4
Quote by Cathbard
Fixed it for you. Otherwise pretty accurate except I would say a fuzz is a harsher type of distortion traditionally. The Muff is the exception and is not as harsh as the traditional fuzz like a fuzz face.

Thanks.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#5
thanx guys! so helpful.. buyin my first tube amp (jet city 20w combo) u know how it is.... lol
#8
Quote by jumpnjax
not sure why u posted that bra.. lol

He just wants to help you with your amp choice.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#10
Quote by jumpnjax
thanx guys! so helpful.. buyin my first tube amp (jet city 20w combo) u know how it is.... lol

Well you are probably going to get some sort of overdive to go with it I'd say. Let me just take a moment to explain some things about the tubescreamer and give you some advice.
The tubescreamer can be used as a fairly clean boost. Never truly clean, but close enough and the distortion on a tubescreamer with the drive knob turned down isn't bad at all.
The thing to know however is that a tubescreamer will cut your bass a bit. This can work to your advantage on some amps but not all. Personally I hate the bass cut on a tubescreamer. On the one I built I changed a capacitor value to bring it back. This mod is something that a lot of people do. All it requires is the ability to solder and a single, easy to obtain capacitor.

If you don't want a bass cut and you aren't handy with a soldering iron then I'd suggest a different type of overdrive. There are plenty out there and I'm far from being the overdrive expert here, I'm more of a tube and amp guy. When you are ready (wait until you have had the amp for a while and know it like the back of your hand) start a new thread.
Ask exactly what you want in the way of sound (a particular song as an example would be good), where you live, your budget and the type of amp and speakers you have. We even have some good pedal builders regularly online. Look at the "Who To Listen To" list in the sticky and if a few of those people say the same thing, take their advice. The Pedalboard thread is worth asking in too. It tends to be a bit of a discussion spam thread but there are some really knowledgeable pedal freaks in there that will take the time to explain stuff to you if you ask nicely.

Nice choice of amp. Before you go buying overdrive/distortion pedals, change the tubes. Seriously, get rid of the preamp tubes immediately. Stash them away as spares.
I suggest a full set of JJ ECC83S tubes. Also buy at least one other. A SED, TungSol, Mullard RI to try in V1. You may find all JJ a tad middy (some people say dark). I'd just use them in everything myself.
Even better still start haunting Ebay for an old British, German, Dutch or American valve for V1. It can be addictive trying to find that perfect old NOS tube for V1 - but it's worth it.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Dec 17, 2011,
#11
Quote by Cathbard

The thing to know however is that a tubescreamer will cut your bass a bit. This can work to your advantage on some amps but not all. Personally I hate the bass cut on a tubescreamer.


this is why i like the green rhino. it has a knob that controls bass cut/boost so you can dial it in just right.
my stuff:
schecter c-1+
ibanez rg3exfm1
schecter avenger 7-string with emgs
esp/ltd mh-50
peavey 6505+ 112 combo
tc electronic polytune
way huge green rhino
mxr micro flange
mxr smart gate
dunlop crybaby
#12
Quote by kutless999
Distortion pedals are usually designed to be used In front of a clean amp, if you don't like your amps natural distortion.

Fuzz is a thicker more juicy type of distortion.

A boost pedal is supposed to be used to add more gain to an amp that's already breaking up.

Overdrive pedals have less gain than distortion pedals and can be used either in front of an amp's clean channel, or in front of it's lead channel.

The tube screamer pedal is a famous overdrive/boost pedal

Drive and gain are usually controls found on distortion and overdrive pedals to controll how much distortion is coming from the pedal itself.

Hope that helps.


Fuzz pedals try to sound like a speaker breaking up. The original sound came from when people would poke holes in speaker cones for the fuzzy tone.
#13
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Fuzz pedals try to sound like a speaker breaking up. The original sound came from when people would poke holes in speaker cones for the fuzzy tone.


i thought fuzz pedals were supposed to sound like a preamp circuit getting clipped the hell out of by 2 huge germanium or silicon diodes. while your story is cool, i don't really see how it actually can be proved (just sounds like someone's opinion) and i don't see how it is pertinent anyway.

i can definitely tell ya Kutless's description of sound and physical detail is much more accurate than yours. a fuzz pedal's implementation is much closer to a 'distortion' pedal than a blown speaker, and a fuzz pedal sounds more like a distortion pedal than it does a damaged speaker (imo anyway).

people did lots of things back in the day to make their amps clip and distort, but proving that 'broken speaker' mods are THE direct ancestor of the fuzz seems to be a bit of stretch. i would feel more accurate saying the gibson maestro fuzz started a distortion circuit revolution that was inspired by distortions achieved with earlier moded amps.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#14
i've heard that story before too gumbi but there is a flaw in the myth. The myth normally goes that "fuzz boxes were invented to replicate the distortion the Kinks got on You Really Got me by slashing the speaker cones."
The flaw in the myth is that the Maestro was released a couple of years earlier than that. It is more likely to be an attempt to replicate some of the sounds some blues guys were getting. They were doing all sorts of weird shit, like seating the valves poorly or running faulty valves. That goes back to the 50's so the Kinks theory is full of holes if you ask me.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#15
^i've heard that the fuzzbox was created to try to reproduce a sound that some country guy who used to plug his guitar straight into the mixing console when recording got once when he plugged into a channel that had a faulty tube.

i can't remember where i read it but i don't think it was from a particularly reliable source. really these things are just theories that can't really be proven, people didn't think documenting this stuff would hold any value in future, much like how many of the master tapes from the early beatles studio sessions that weren't used were destroyed.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#16
Lol quite a lot of myths

EDIT: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuzz_Face

"This "fuzz" sound is sometimes compared to the sound of a damaged speaker. In fact, early efforts to achieve this type of sound included actually ripping or poking holes in guitar amplifier speakers."

Looks like its actually the other way around....
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Dec 17, 2011,
#17
Most likely it is that lots of people were coming up with various ways to get distortion and some engineer tried to come up with a product that they could sell that would get reliable distortion. Once one person made a distortion pedal and it sold then many followed and people started comparing them to particular distortions they'd heard.
"This sounds like the Kink's ripped speaker" becomes, "They made this to sound like the Kink's ripped speaker."
It's probably more of a matter of engineers coming up with different ways to get distortion and to an engineer, distortion just means clipping the sucka. It is unlikely that they analysed the waveform and tried to replicate it, they just tried different clipping circuits and tested them on the market. Guitarists then made the comparisons, not the designer. And so, many myths were born.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#18
^yeah, the maestro did come out in 62... damn.

Quote by Cathbard
It's probably more of a matter of engineers coming up with different ways to get distortion and to an engineer, distortion just means clipping the sucka. It is unlikely that they analysed the waveform and tried to replicate it, they just tried different clipping circuits and tested them on the market. Guitarists then made the comparisons, not the designer. And so, many myths were born.


yeah, this sounds more like it. engineers were approached to develop a product and guitarist derived the 'convenient history' that fits with what they know.

i also love it when people start the whole 'Back in the day tube amps didn't distort so they had to break them to get distortion and then later they got pedals that would do it.' that is total BS. my '54 gretsch supro has some sick distortion (and i am thinking the design is VERY similar to the old fender model 26 design that go back to the 40's). distortion was around back in the day, you didn't have to slice speakers or break preamps to get it either (it was just usually considered unfavorable, "better"/'professional" amps from back then were designed to have more headroom for live performance).
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Dec 17, 2011,
#19
Yeah, man. Crank up a tweed Fender and it will distort fine. There were people doing some weird shit to get a different sound to everybody else then though. You couldn't just buy a heap of peddles to get your sound, you had to be inventive.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Dec 17, 2011,