#2
To be honest, the bass drum sound isn't the problem - the whole drum kit is lietting down the mix. The sanre is loud, bassy and 'woofy' - I'd suggest cutting out some lower mids for a tighter, brighter snare sound. You could also try artificially tuning it up using a high quality pitch shifter.

The whole drum kit sounds very dark and boxy, like it was recorded with one mic in a tiny room.

You need to set up a compression bus on the drums, they sound a little too 'live' for the sound you're going for. Just a light compression ratio with quite a low threshold will help. Also try panning out the overheads a little more for more of a stereo feel. A subtle, short delay (a stereo slapback maybe) could sound great too.
#3
modern kicks have a lot more high mids than you'd think
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#5
for rock there is only one low ender- either the kick or the bass guitar. I usually leave the bottom for the bass and fit the kick in the upper mids like I mentioned earlier. If you're after that "modern" kick drum sound (thumping but a lot more of the attack/beater) that's it
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
#6
The basic things on kick are how much low end and how much of the pedal hitting the drum. I'm drugged up from getting wisdom teeth out so can't think of real terms lol.

Basically locate your kick and bad and decid where you want them. It's personal preference I like he low of the kick lower than the bass. Then boost your attack in the mids to get the amount of "click" you desire.