#1
So my biggest problem with the guitar, is that i cant seem to build a lick libary. I dont know if it is important to set a spesific routine for this, or what? I play everything from jazz to metal. I feel really stuck on this... Can you please help me? I can learn a lick, but i forget it the next day. Maybe name some players who is good to begin whith learning licks from (jazz players)?
#2
I find using it in my improv helps immensely. Try that.

Edit: Not that I ever conciously learn licks for the sake of learning licks, I pick them up from solos/other pieces that I like the sound of. I especially like taking phrases and pieces I do on piano in music class and putting them onto the guitar. Also, mdc's advice is great, think about concepts, and how you want your piece to 'feel', how you want it to sound, and how you can achieve that.

Much better than typing 'cool blues licks' or whatever into google.
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Last edited by lfcagger at Dec 17, 2011,
#3
Licks are cool to fall back on. Try sucking as well.

Think in concepts and phrases.
#4
Quote by Usernames sucks
So my biggest problem with the guitar, is that i cant seem to build a lick libary. I dont know if it is important to set a spesific routine for this, or what? I play everything from jazz to metal. I feel really stuck on this... Can you please help me? I can learn a lick, but i forget it the next day. Maybe name some players who is good to begin whith learning licks from (jazz players)?


Here is what works for me, not sure if it will for you but it might! I never record myself or go out of my way to remember licks or build some kind of library of licks, you know why? Because I only remember what I really like the sound of! All of my licks and riffs etc. come from improving or from listening to others and it sticks with me because I know my scales and I love the way they sound. You will find that you will naturally build up a library of licks. So, the answer is to just let your lick library come naturally by letting what really sounds good to you stick with you forever.
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Dec 17, 2011,
#5
learn the licks in all 12 keys. if it's a lick over a major ii-V change it to be over a minor ii-V and learn THAT in all 12 keys too.

and use the licks as a basis for the sound. listen to the different ways this one lick is played:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krDxhnaKD7Q

i mean it's a joke, but listen to the numerous ways people phrase it and place it (unfortunately this video doesn't lend itself to context well). just start out with five licks. and REALLY learn them:

1) all twelve keys. and do in a cycle of fourths. chromaticism lends itself to just moving the shape/pattern up a fret each time and thus taking some of the necessary thinking out of it.

2) if it's an arpeggio of some kind, alter it to be various different chords/progressions.

3) figure out what the lick sounds like over different chords. sometimes i work in a little run i worked out from a tune called "don't take your love from me". since no one ever really plays that tune, sometimes i play it over "there will never be another you" as a starting point. the original chords the lick is over are:

|Ebmaj7 Fmin7|Gmin7 Gbo7|Bb7 |Fmin7 Bb7|

there will never be another you:

|Ebmaj7| % |Dmin7b5 |G7b9 |

and it sounds great. gives it an entirely different feel though given the context.



(that F is supposed to be tied into the fourth bar, sorry)
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 18, 2011,
#6
I play everything from jazz to metal.


Do you? Then you're fine, why'd you need to memorise licks?


If you're struggling, what really helped me is relating the licks to the closest relevant CAGED shape.
#7
I'd stay take a step back - sounds like you're approaching this from a very mechanical point of view, trying too hard to simply remember the pattern your fingers are supposed to follow.

First thing to do is to memorise the SOUND of the lick you want to learn, because then you'll always hace a chance of figuring out how to play it even if you can't remember it exactly. Now if you focus on learning your nuts and bolts as it were, pitch recognition and basic interval knowledge, then all of a sudden it becomes much less of a memorisation exercise and more a case of slotting together manageable chunks of knowledge.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
If you think you learned a lick and forgot it the next day, then you obviously didnt learn it. Practice it until you remember it, practice linking into it with other licks, coming out of it, using it in solos, playing it over different chords, in different positions, in different keys, etc. Hopefully as you practice these things (especially coming in and out of it) you will develop your own licks, which youll pretty much never forget
#9
Quote by Usernames sucks
So my biggest problem with the guitar, is that i cant seem to build a lick libary. I dont know if it is important to set a spesific routine for this, or what? I play everything from jazz to metal. I feel really stuck on this... Can you please help me? I can learn a lick, but i forget it the next day. Maybe name some players who is good to begin whith learning licks from (jazz players)?

Oui Oui
#11
Quote by Usernames sucks
Is it normal to do it that way, i mean, i have heard that you shuld learn as many as possible...

Anyway is normal. Some are just more beneficial than others.

Rather than learn and memorize 183 licks, on all string sets, in every position, in all 12 keys, I'd prefer to think in concepts which is kinda useful when improvising. Although improvising isn't what you asked about, you did mention Jazz.

A concept could be something like... double stops. Right, so instead of delving in to my lick library, I have just that one concept in my mind.

Phrases, yeah, they communicate the language of music better than licks, also, it's not just the "lick" per se, think about dynamics too. Yes I use licks, everyone does. It's nice to have a balance though.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 19, 2011,
#13
Steven Seagull really hit it on the head to me. You've got to memorize the SOUND. You may learn a lick in a specific context, but unless you take it out of that one context and hear it used in other ways..maybe with minor variations to the phrasing you'll never have it memorized and at your disposal.
#14
bach didn't have a lick library
modes are a social construct
#15
Quote by Hail
bach didn't have a lick library

Are you kidding? How do you think Bach got laid?

Actually that's a good point about learning the pitch/sound/intervals of licks and phrases. I was thinking about that the other day. I feel like I've been too mechanical myself; trying to remember where to put my fingers instead of remember what pitch/sound that I want.

Recently, if I forgot a lick, I try and play it out by ear instead of looking up the tab again. Ultimately, this is how I would like to play music, but I really need to start on interval ear training.
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