#1
Hey! I have messed around with Cubase and my Ugm 96 soundcard for a while now, and I'm getting sick of it! So I started look for studios and prices, but found this local guy who says he could do it for a more reasonable price for youth and says that many people at my age (17 yrs old) have recorded a demo there. He have a studio 30 mins from where I live.

So I told my guitar teacher about this and he says I need to have more understanding of it before I enter a studio. I am tempted to enter a studio anyway, because maybe I could learn a bit about home recording while there also! My mom and dad know this guy and this guy is around 50-60 years old (my mom and dads generation), so I believe he know what he's doing, and it's legit!

I already have one song finished for a two song single!

Should I go for it?
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#2
I think this is one of those questions you need to answer yourself. Are you happy with the songs you made? Are you willing to spend the money to have them recorded? Do you trust the guy to do a good job? These are questions you should be asking yourself when you make your decision.
#3
Quote by chronic_stp
I think this is one of those questions you need to answer yourself. Are you happy with the songs you made? Are you willing to spend the money to have them recorded? Do you trust the guy to do a good job? These are questions you should be asking yourself when you make your decision.

+1.

If you decide to go through with it, one thing I can't stress enough is to PRACTICE LIKE MAD before you go in. There's nothing I can't stand more than people coming in to record and wasting my time because they don't have their songs structured and rehearsed.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#4
The guys above pretty much summed it up. It's more about whether you think you're ready for it, and know the parts well enough more than anything. Although a little knowledge about recording can be very useful .

Are you planning on playing everything yourself, or are you in a band, or are you just wanting to record onto a backing track? The post is quite unclear, and there's not much point in paying for studio time, just to record over a backing track, in my opinion. Assuming you're only instrument is guitar, that is. If you can play everything yourself, or know people who could play the other instruments, then that isn't a worry.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Dec 17, 2011,
#5
You're right! And I'm not done yet! By far! I just want to know if it's absolutely needed to know much about recording? And also what do I start to record with? To start with guitars or drums is what seemed logic to me, but I may be wrong! :P

Anyway thanks for the answers! And I have the answer to one of them already: Yes I am willing to spend a little money to have them recorded! I know I need more rehearsing tho! :P

Carl: I am going to play guitars and do the vocals and maybe I get someone to else to do the bass, if not I'm doing the bass myself too. I will need to have the drums programmed, but he said he knew someone for that :P
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
Last edited by ThrashLife at Dec 17, 2011,
#6
Usually people start with drums if they're doing stuff individually. Although some people like to record a rhythm section (bass and drums, or guitar, bass and drums, for example). Some people even start with other stuff first. It's really just down to whatever works best for you and the engineer/producer at the studio. If you think you might be limited by time during the session, I'd advise trying to put a rhythm section together, if you know a good drummer and bassist who can work well together.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#7
Quote by Carl6661
Usually people start with drums if they're doing stuff individually. Although some people like to record a rhythm section (bass and drums, or guitar, bass and drums, for example). Some people even start with other stuff first. It's really just down to whatever works best for you and the engineer/producer at the studio. If you think you might be limited by time during the session, I'd advise trying to put a rhythm section together, if you know a good drummer and bassist who can work well together.


Hmm, okay thanks for answering man! I don't know any drummers that can do double bass pedals (which is needed) so I am restricted there (that's why I need drums programmed). About limited time in studio, I don't know. I am going to give the guy a call after christmas

Anyway I'm really psyched about this! It's my great dream to become an artist no matter how big I get! All I want is to play music and hopefully people will like it! I am going to document it, hopefully make something like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pczpY6Z7qWM (I chose part 2 because it has action. In part 1 they are just in the studio xD)

And thanks once again!
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"
#8
All great advice given. Another thing to practice up on is playing with a metronome. You will be way happier with the results of your recording if you have practiced your songs in perfect timing with a click track or metronome or something like that. There are tons of free metronome's you can download to your phone or play on your computer. By practicing this way you essentially "tighten up" your sound. Which is better for everybody in my opinion.. (Not the gospel by any means tho) =) Good luck and remember to keep it fun! =)
#9
Quote by surjer
All great advice given. Another thing to practice up on is playing with a metronome. You will be way happier with the results of your recording if you have practiced your songs in perfect timing with a click track or metronome or something like that. There are tons of free metronome's you can download to your phone or play on your computer. By practicing this way you essentially "tighten up" your sound. Which is better for everybody in my opinion.. (Not the gospel by any means tho) =) Good luck and remember to keep it fun! =)

+1 to this. It's even more irritating when people come here to record and completely fail at playing to a metronome
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#10
Quote by surjer
All great advice given. Another thing to practice up on is playing with a metronome. You will be way happier with the results of your recording if you have practiced your songs in perfect timing with a click track or metronome or something like that. There are tons of free metronome's you can download to your phone or play on your computer. By practicing this way you essentially "tighten up" your sound. Which is better for everybody in my opinion.. (Not the gospel by any means tho) =) Good luck and remember to keep it fun! =)


Yeah, after I finish my second song (chorus and intro already done!) I'm going to practice my ass off! Thanks for the tip!
Quote by carlos_almighty
You just wanna try it? My philosophy is, "If it makes you curious, try it at least once."


Also: "Time you enjoy wasting, is not wasted!"