#1
Hi,

I dod not know where to post this but how can there be to power chords that have the name G5

Like

---------------

---------------

---------12--

-5------12--

-5------10--

-3-----------

Both are G5 power chords but have a different root. How can you tell them apart in a tab when it's just written G5 ? I'm just playing with tabs but i want to pick up some theory along the way
#3
Those chords are made of 3 notes right?
3 notes can be found on many places on the Fretboard.

Now go and learn some music Theory
#4
Quote by Slashiepie
Those chords are made of 3 notes right?
3 notes can be found on many places on the Fretboard.

Now go and learn some music Theory


It's not music theory he needs, it's just basic fretboard knowledge.
Not saying that music theory isn't important by any means, but just knowing that 10th fret A string is a G note would've saved a lot of confusion.
#5
No, he needs to know theory - without it you'll never understand why things are what they are.

Chords are theory - theory teaches you how to construct chords, and if you know that then the TS's question answers itself.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
that's what happen when you just learn songs with tab. You're not a guitar player just someone who learned to play that one song.

sure you pick some things here and there but i am far from tabing songs by ear or writting my own songs.
#7
Hope this helps. A G5 chord is basically G plus the fifth which as other posters have said is the D. That is why they are both G5 chords because they only include G and D with G being the lowest sounding note.

This is one of the hard things about playing guitar, especially sight reading. The two "chords" (not technically a chord because you would need three different notes), are an octave apart, however, there are many different positions to play either.

It might sound complicated but when you get used to the idea you will see that you have a lot of tonal options available to you by playing the same notes on different strings.
#8
Quote by steven seagull
No, he needs to know theory - without it you'll never understand why things are what they are.

Chords are theory - theory teaches you how to construct chords, and if you know that then the TS's question answers itself.


I agree, theory is also a great way to communicate during jam sessions and the like. My knowledge isn't amazing, but I know enough to communicate with my friends via scale degrees and chord changes. It makes jamming more fulfilling when you discuss what you're playing before, and even during the jam. When I look at my bassist and he seems lost, I can just shout to him, "flat 5!" and he'll understand."
#9
Quote by bast1981

Both are G5 power chords but have a different root. How can you tell them apart in a tab when it's just written G5 ? I'm just playing with tabs but i want to pick up some theory along the way


The short answer is you don't tell from reading a chord name.

You can listen to the song. Those two voicings of the chord sound very different, don't they? Your ears are more important than your eyes when it comes to music - always listen. With experience you'll learn to hear the difference between those two chords easily.

There are other G5 chords, too. For example 033 on the three highest strings is a G5 chord. So is x x 5 7 8 x (or 10 on the high e).