#1
Does anybody know a website or some resource that allows you to enter a note (like A/B/E etc.) and it pops out all the chords that contain that note?

I think it would be incredible useful for song writing and creating chord progressions.
#3
Learn to stack in thirds, it'll be much more useful in the future. A major chord has a major third with a minor third stacked on top of it. C major for example is C E G. C to E is a major third and E to G is a minor third. A minor chord is the opposite. A minor, for eample is A C E. A to C is a minor third, C to E a major third. With that knowledge you can figure out any context of any note. You can expand it to. This not only helps with song writing but soloing.

For a basic example. You're given the note B. That can be the root of a B major or B minor triad, it can be the third of a G major or G# minor triad and the fifth of a C major or C minor triad.
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#4
Just because a chord contains a certain note, that certainly doesn't mean it will be consonant with any other chord containing that same note lol.

I mean, take a C# major triad [C# E# G#] and an A major triad [A C# E]. Yes they both have C#, but it's a two-step displacement (G# semitone to A, E# semitone to E) and, if you're based in the key of C#, is also the bVI Chord (Flat Major Sixth) of that key, which although actually decently common in late Classical and basically all Romantic-era music, is not going to sound consonant as a guitar-driven chord in rock songs, especially since the possibility for proper resolution of the voices is troubling at best on guitar.
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#5
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#6
Quote by Greenfinger182
Just because a chord contains a certain note, that certainly doesn't mean it will be consonant with any other chord containing that same note lol.

I mean, take a C# major triad [C# E# G#] and an A major triad [A C# E]. Yes they both have C#, but it's a two-step displacement (G# semitone to A, E# semitone to E) and, if you're based in the key of C#, is also the bVI Chord (Flat Major Sixth) of that key, which although actually decently common in late Classical and basically all Romantic-era music, is not going to sound consonant as a guitar-driven chord in rock songs, especially since the possibility for proper resolution of the voices is troubling at best on guitar.


C# to A sounds pretty damn good to me. Lots of bands use those two chords together - including Muse in Apocalypse Please off the top of my head.
Last edited by Nitnatsnok at Dec 18, 2011,
#7
Quote by Nitnatsnok
C# to A sounds pretty damn good to me. Lots of bands use those two chords together - including Muse off the top of my head.


You mean C#-minor to A-major right? C#-major to A-major soud a bit wierd since it's not in either the minor or major scale.
#9
It can fit in a few songs but it will most of the time it wont fit well unless you are trying to create the feel like in the Muse song. That's just my opinion though.
#10
Quote by JB95
It can fit in a few songs but it will most of the time it wont fit well unless you are trying to create the feel like in the Muse song. That's just my opinion though.


So they managed to make it fit - which means it can be done...
#11
Quote by Greenfinger182
Just because a chord contains a certain note, that certainly doesn't mean it will be consonant with any other chord containing that same note lol.

I mean, take a C# major triad [C# E# G#] and an A major triad [A C# E]. Yes they both have C#, but it's a two-step displacement (G# semitone to A, E# semitone to E) and, if you're based in the key of C#, is also the bVI Chord (Flat Major Sixth) of that key, which although actually decently common in late Classical and basically all Romantic-era music, is not going to sound consonant as a guitar-driven chord in rock songs, especially since the possibility for proper resolution of the voices is troubling at best on guitar.



lol i know. I'm not going to give a post with my five years of music theory education on here to explain the importance of stacking thirds.

Chromatic mediants are cool anyway, C# major to A major is a bitchin' sound. They work pretty well on a guitar too, if you know what you're doing. Hell you don't even have to know. The barre chords sound cool enough. And if you open your ears enough chords with a single shared note played in succession are immensely interesting, if not consonant. We've been moving away from consonance for the last 600 years anyway.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Dec 18, 2011,
#12
Quote by Artemis Entreri
lol i know. I'm not going to give a post with my five years of music theory education on here to explain the importance of stacking thirds.
I was actually talking to the OP...wasn't referring to what you had posted before me, not any part of your post.

We should talk sometime though, I think we could have some good convos on this stuff. I'm a semester away from graduating University in music theory (4 years of intense study for me, forgive my lack of knowledge :p). Took a grad class this semester that was this most difficult/informative harmonic course I've ever taken, it was called "19th Century Chromaticism." Both Beethoven and Schubert...incredible modulatory and harmonic ideas. Just such geniuses. Then we moved onto Wagner and it was like Spent damn near a month on the Prelude to Tristan and Isolde...****ing diminished 7th chords.
Quote by Nitnatsnok
You're in the key of F#m. C#maj to Amaj is just the dominant reverting to the major III chord, which will sound consonant in that key. You've forgotten to think in the tonal mold most bands operate under, that is being in a key. My example specifically said that we were in the key of C#M. Making the key F#m will completely change the harmonic contexts of every chord change.

Thinking a chord shift is uniform no matter what key you're in is a large theoretical mistake to make.
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Last edited by Greenfinger182 at Dec 19, 2011,
#13
Quote by Greenfinger182
I was actually talking to the OP...wasn't referring to what you had posted before me, not any part of your post.

We should talk sometime though, I think we could have some good convos on this stuff. I'm a semester away from graduating University in music theory (4 years of intense study for me, forgive my lack of knowledge :p). Took a grad class this semester that was this most difficult/informative harmonic course I've ever taken, it was called "19th Century Chromaticism." Both Beethoven and Schubert...incredible modulatory and harmonic ideas. Just such geniuses. Then we moved onto Wagner and it was like Spent damn near a month on the Prelude to Tristan and Isolde...****ing diminished 7th chords.
You're in the key of F#m. C#maj to Amaj is just the dominant reverting to the major III chord, which will sound consonant in that key. You've forgotten to think in the tonal mold most bands operate under, that is being in a key. My example specifically said that we were in the key of C#M. Making the key F#m will completely change the harmonic contexts of every chord change.

Thinking a chord shift is uniform no matter what key you're in is a large theoretical mistake to make.


Ah fair enough then! I've had enough people recently telling me that I don't know what I'm talking about since I give advice out of the HUGE ****ING CONTEXT that it's in. I'm 2 semesters away from graduating but I've taken all of my theory classes. Now I'm just doing orchestration, comp, electronic music and my final history. Just wrote my end of the semester research paper on Beethoven's Late Quartets, op. 131 in particular. Beautiful piece with that fuge at the beginning.
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#14
After you study complex theory for a while (especially the Romantic period), it's very difficult to go back to thinking in much more simple contexts. My post probably came off as snobby because I'm in the same boat as you...actually, I just finished writing about the same piece you were haha. For me it was a 3500-word paper comparing the modulatory and harmonic connotations and differences of Beethoven's late quartets (No. 14 is what I focused on, like you) and Schubert's late quartets (No. 15 was my focus for him, which is an absolutely INCREDIBLE piece if you haven't heard it...listen to the first movement once and you'll be hooked by the power). My actual thesis was how Schubert progressed what Beethoven essentially started as far as changing key areas go.

Are you into the additional analysis systems? Up until this year I was always using Webern-Style Roman Numeral Analysis (with moveable do). But that system just doesn't suffice when you get to Schubert and Liszt and Schumann and Wagner, etc...they had us using Schenkerian and Neo-Riemannian analysis. It's surprising how well a lot of Schubert's modulatory patterns mold to the whole neo-riemmannian idea of focusing on half-step displacement in voices as ruling our idea of "consonance" rather than looking at an entire major scale and the displacement of all the voices therein.

I'm rambling. But you should definitely shoot me a PM or something, outside of class I can never find people to talk to this stuff about.
They say the old woman's got the wisdom
'Cause she couldn't read the clock anymore
She said "The numbers don't represent the moments"
Says she don't see what all the ticking's for