#1
I've seen several videos about pinch harmonics but I can't get a good pinch-harmonic-sound.

Can you help me out?

I have tried with:
-Bridge pickups
-Lots of distortion
-"Attack" different places at the string

I get harmonics sometimes but I not get good pinch harmonic whenever I want.

So I am a kind of confused and don't know what to do. Can you help me UGs?
#2
HONESTLY I believe alot of it has to do with tone. Theres certain tones I can play amazing pinch harmonics on and certain ones I cant. It all depends. I find high gain makes it easier.
#3
^This. there are some high distortions that i can do them on and some i cant. i find it really depends on how much feedback/high output/boosted signal your tone gets. mess around with your settings. once you get the right one it become really easy.
#4
And you call yourself "Metal-pro"? HA!

Neck pickups work best for Pinch Harmonics. Low mids sometimes help.

It's all about the pickup mostly. I recommend these http://wildepickups.com/Wilde_Bill_s_Twin_Blades.html the L-500s on the bottom of the page. Dimebag Darrel used them, and we all know how good his pinch harmonics are. If you don't want to get one of these, then the DiMarzio D Activator (I believe that's what they are called) are pretty good too.

You can also change your pick, to something more stiff. The Dunlop Jazz III picks are really good for pulling off pinch harmonics.

And also, practice!

Good luck!
#5
While distortion may help, that's not the key. You can squeal an acoustic guitar if you want to. Technique is the key. Try choking up on your pick so your thumb is closer to the strings, attack the string at a downward angle so your thumb just grazes the string. Try moving up and down the string to find your guitars sweet spot. Last but not least, the trick to nasty squeals is vibrato. Shake that string up and down as fast as you can. I mean shake that thing like your trying to flip a booger off your finger. That'll get you on the right road.....
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#6
i find it works on scooped hi gain settings. not so much on settings with alot of mids.
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#7
If you can get some good ones, but not all the time, then it's purely a matter of technique. I think you should look at the physics behind it. An harmonic produces a node which divides the string. A pinch harmonic is producing that node with your picking hand at the same time as picking it. For what follows, play it clean. Do not use distortion. If you can't do the first example cleanly, then you need to practice it.

Play the open string, but do a pinch harmonic over the 12th fret. That's the absolute easiest to achieve. You divide the string into half. So if you want to get an octave harmonic on any fretted note, pinch it halfway along the string. So an octave pinch harmonic on the 7th fret = pinch at the 19th fret. 15th fret = pinch where the 27th fret would be.

Then do one over the 7th fret on an open string. That's an octave+fifth. You're dividing the string into thirds so there are two nodes, so you get two places to pinch, either 1/3rd or 2/3rds the distance from your fretted note.

Then to take it up two octaves, you divide the string into quarters... so you... actually only have two nodes to hit to do a two-octave pinch harmonic, because the middle node would only produce a one-octave harmonic because it's half. Et cetera. Through practice you'll learn how to gauge where you should pick, and it's all thanks to physics. Science is fun!
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Last edited by Dayn at Dec 18, 2011,
#8
Quote by Dayn
If you can get some good ones, but not all the time, then it's purely a matter of technique. I think you should look at the physics behind it. An harmonic produces a node which divides the string. A pinch harmonic is producing that node with your picking hand at the same time as picking it. For what follows, play it clean. Do not use distortion. If you can't do the first example cleanly, then you need to practice it.

Play the open string, but do a pinch harmonic over the 12th fret. That's the absolute easiest to achieve. You divide the string into half. So if you want to get an octave harmonic on any fretted note, pinch it halfway along the string. So an octave pinch harmonic on the 7th fret = pinch at the 19th fret. 15th fret = pinch where the 27th fret would be.

Then do one over the 7th fret on an open string. That's an octave+fifth. You're dividing the string into thirds so there are two nodes, so you get two places to pinch, either 1/3rd or 2/3rds the distance from your fretted note.

Then to take it up two octaves, you divide the string into quarters... so you... actually only have two nodes to hit to do a two-octave pinch harmonic, because the middle node would only produce a one-octave harmonic because it's half. Et cetera. Through practice you'll learn how to gauge where you should pick, and it's all thanks to physics. Science is fun!
Thank you! ^^
#9
Pinch harmonics was one of the first techniques i learned. I have been playing for four years now, and can do one with almost any or no gain. so I guess it comes down to practice and technique.
#11
Quote by MantheDan
And you call yourself "Metal-pro"? HA!

Neck pickups work best for Pinch Harmonics. Low mids sometimes help.

No they don't, the bridge pickup works best as it gives you better top-end response. No they don't, if you suck out the mids you're going to be sucking out the very frequencies you're trying to isolate.

It's all about the pickup mostly.

No it's not.


You can also change your pick, to something more stiff. The Dunlop Jazz III picks are really good for pulling off pinch harmonics.

And also, practice!

Good luck!

Stiffer picks can sometimes help, and the Jazz 3s are smaller which can make it easier to damp the string - however you should be able to play harmonics with any pick you choose, it's even possible to do them without a pick.
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#12
I can manage to play the pinch harmonics but I cannot just "play" them, I have to really attack the strings with power to get harmonics but I have seen people make harmonics when it looks like they are picking "normally."
Get it? :P
#13
^^I really think it's another case where practice makes perfect. I can get pinch harmonics all day long on an unplugged electric guitar and even acoustic guitars.

You could also try playing around with different picks and more importantly, different wear-levels of picks. I find that a slightly worn pick can help me get the best harmonics. Also play around with where you pick the notes. Don't pick the note right over a pickup or you'll be placing the node right where the pickup needs to "hear" the harmonic and it won't sound.

I've also found that a Tubescreamer helps immensely, as well as a little chorus/modulation on top of distortion. It's not so much the high gain that helps; as I stated pinch harmonics are quite doable on an acoustic guitar. The tubescreamer seems to increase the sustain of the squeal sound, and the chorus effect adds depth to it. It's kind of hard to describe, other than with those two effects I can get close to the Dimebag/David Gilmoreseque lead tones.
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Last edited by KailM at Dec 19, 2011,
#15
Quote by Metal-pro
I can manage to play the pinch harmonics but I cannot just "play" them, I have to really attack the strings with power to get harmonics but I have seen people make harmonics when it looks like they are picking "normally."
Get it? :P

This might just be your approach; in general I hit harmonics pretty hard as well, primarily because I have a pretty hard pick attack regularly so it feels more natural to me to dig into a harmonic. The force of your attack may not be where the problem is, it most likely has more to do with how you're catching the string with your thumb, the place you're picking along the string, and so forth.
#16
Buy some of those small Black Jazz III's made for metal.


The only problem is you lose all ability to do them with any other kind of pick
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#18
With enough practice you can do pinch harmonics even with an acoustic guitar. I never directly tried to learn them, but as my playing skills and pick handling improved, the harmonics just became easy.

So just focus on improving your skills universally, and the harmonics should begin to appear