#1
i am making a general inquire.

i know they change the signal, but don't understand how.

i know that pedals come bbp and tb, and how sound degrades if you were to use a bunch of TB pedals, however buffers can help to prevent that.

i realize that they drive the signal more so you doesn't lose its ______ (don't know what word fits here).

_______________

also, are buffers something that somebody with a soldering iron and a bit knowledge could build?
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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#2
Ok, so a buffer is just a clean boost set to 0.1, or 1, or barely over unity, or whatever you want to call it. It bumps the signal just enough to "drive" the cable. What that means is that over long runs of cable (or a long chain of TBP pedals, same thing) you can lose some high end if you don't have a buffer in front.

So, as you know, not all clean boosts sound the same. Same goes for buffers. If you got a bad clean boost, you wouldn't like it, even if it were set very low. If you got 6 clean boosts all set very low, your signal would probably sound pretty weird, too. It's the same deal with buffers.

That's why TBP pedals are popular - they are the "least worst" option for most of your pedals. Having too many buffers in your chain can make it sound weird, but you can have as many TBP pedals as you want, and if one of them is on (any pedal, when on, will function as a buffer for the rest of the chain after it) or if one early in the chain is buffered, the whole line is being driven properly. 5 buffered pedals, especially if one or two have poor buffers, can end up sounding really bad.

What I do is to just run a clean boost first in the chain, with all TBP pedals. That way, with guitars like Teles where you might actually want that treble loss, you can run without any buffers. When needed, the boost can just be set to drive the chain, which adds a bit of treble without messing with the signal too much. Then you've got a clean boost if you need it, which is often useful.

As to your build question - yes, very easy to make. You might as well make the clean boost, for reasons I mentioned above. Both builds are very easy, but building a clean boost gets you a line driver and a useful pedal, and the ability to turn it off to hear the difference.
#3
+1

apart from the fact that i just use the buffer in my decimator as it's really good. but if you don't have a buffer already, then getting one which you can switch on or off (and also use as a clean boost when needed) probably makes more sense.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#4
Quote by Roc8995
Ok, so a buffer is just a clean boost set to 0.1, or 1, or barely over unity, or whatever you want to call it. It bumps the signal just enough to "drive" the cable. What that means is that over long runs of cable (or a long chain of TBP pedals, same thing) you can lose some high end if you don't have a buffer in front.

So, as you know, not all clean boosts sound the same. Same goes for buffers. If you got a bad clean boost, you wouldn't like it, even if it were set very low. If you got 6 clean boosts all set very low, your signal would probably sound pretty weird, too. It's the same deal with buffers.

That's why TBP pedals are popular - they are the "least worst" option for most of your pedals. Having too many buffers in your chain can make it sound weird, but you can have as many TBP pedals as you want, and if one of them is on (any pedal, when on, will function as a buffer for the rest of the chain after it) or if one early in the chain is buffered, the whole line is being driven properly. 5 buffered pedals, especially if one or two have poor buffers, can end up sounding really bad.

What I do is to just run a clean boost first in the chain, with all TBP pedals. That way, with guitars like Teles where you might actually want that treble loss, you can run without any buffers. When needed, the boost can just be set to drive the chain, which adds a bit of treble without messing with the signal too much. Then you've got a clean boost if you need it, which is often useful.

As to your build question - yes, very easy to make. You might as well make the clean boost, for reasons I mentioned above. Both builds are very easy, but building a clean boost gets you a line driver and a useful pedal, and the ability to turn it off to hear the difference.


thank you very much for the information. i will probably take the clean boost route. i will build a few likely. i have a lot going on as far as my rigs go i have three fully independent rigs for different things, and all could probably warrant a clean boost.

is any clean boost circuit superior or inferior than another? which one would you recommend to build?

thanks.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#5
i dunno which is best, but there are a bunch of them on the diy pedal websites (plus schematics for the more popular mass produced ones shouldn't be too hard to find).

ones like byoc and musikding will even have downloadable instructions so you can have a sort of an idea of how much bother it'll be before you even start.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Most clean boost pedals are decent if made well, since there's not a lot of parts involved. The one I use is a Zvex SHO clone, which is one of the brighter ones. I like it since it's got a reverse linear taper pot which means it stays about the same volume most of the time and then gets real loud towards the end of the taper. That's useful for a driver since I can kick it with my foot and nearly anywhere in the middle 50% of the sweep results in a transparent line driver.
The only one I'd definitely stay away from is the EXH LPB. It's a decent pedal but it's not a good clean boost, more of an overdrive.
#7
a true buffer for a guitar type signal should only provide current gain and almost unity voltage gain.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#8
I always assumed you would want the buffer AFTER the long line of true bypass pedals/cables.

But it's before, huh?
#9
^ nah you want it as close to your guitar as possible (unless you have pedals which don't like being after a buffer). if you really cared you could even build it into your guitar.

some people put one at the end of the chain, too. Not sure if that's really needed or not... maybe if you have a gigantic pedalboard.

EDIT: that being said, mine normally goes pretty close to the end of the chain, as it's in my decimator so i want that after most of my pedals to cut the noise- and it works well. It still sounds "better" than not being there.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Dec 20, 2011,