#1
Hey everyone,

This week we're looking at ninth chords!

I explain how to create each chord and then I show you how you apply that knowledge to the fretboard and actually play each chord,

We're looking at major, minor, dominate and ADD chords today,

Hope you guys like it,
Feedback is always welcome, I take everything on board,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ib_ZgRqvZ90

Sincerely,

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#2
nice! Thanks
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#3
If youre playing in C major and want I make a 9th chord based on the E note do you use Emaj9b or do you normally borrow an F#?
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#4
If you want to stay diatonic to C, it would be an F, though why do you feel you need to stay to the notes of C major?

Emin is diatonic to C major, not Emaj.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Dec 20, 2011,
#6
Er yeah, I meant minor sorry haha

So would then it be Emin9b or Emin9? I'm guessing Emin9b? Just as A would be Amin9 because of the full step between A and B.. All diatonic to C I mean
Ibanez RGD2127Z w/ BKP Aftermaths
Seagull Entourage Rustic
Peavey 6505 212
Dunlop ZW-45 Crybaby
#7
In a major key, the iii chord would be labelled as a sus4b9 chord, including the b3 just makes it sound rough as hell. Although I'm sure it pops up every now and then.

It's easier to just play a Dm6/9 chord with E in the bass.
#8
Quote by engineno9
Er yeah, I meant minor sorry haha

So would then it be Emin9b or Emin9? I'm guessing Emin9b? Just as A would be Amin9 because of the full step between A and B.. All diatonic to C I mean


correct buddy

some people like to really spell out the chords when writing them,
I know for example on one exam this year the tutor was so strict we wanted the full use of brackets,

i.e:

Amin9

Amin9 (maj7)

or

Emin9b

Emin (9b)

you really don't have to be that strict though
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#9
Quote by mdc
In a major key, the iii chord would be labelled as a sus4b9 chord, including the b3 just makes it sound rough as hell. Although I'm sure it pops up every now and then.

It's easier to just play a Dm6/9 chord with E in the bass.


Why the sus4? If anything i'd have thought the b9 would clash with the tonic, not the b3?
Ibanez RGD2127Z w/ BKP Aftermaths
Seagull Entourage Rustic
Peavey 6505 212
Dunlop ZW-45 Crybaby
#10
Quote by engineno9
Why the sus4? If anything i'd have thought the b9 would clash with the tonic, not the b3?

Well the 3rd in any chord provides somewhat of a functional sound. The b9 confuses the function.

The iii chord has a weak functional role anyway, often standing in for the I. So adding the b9 may confuse it with the ii or IV which isn't helpful.

Replace the 3rd with the 4th and you have a more mysterious chord that doesn't really want to go anywhere. Kinda useful in modal jazz.
Last edited by mdc at Dec 20, 2011,
#11
Quote by mdc
Well the 3rd in any chord provides somewhat of a functional sound. The b9 confuses the function.

The iii chord has a weak functional role anyway, often standing in for the I. So adding the b9 may confuse it with the ii or IV which isn't helpful.

Replace the 3rd with the 4th and you have a more mysterious chord that doesn't really want to go anywhere. Kinda useful in modal jazz.


Makes sense, thanks.

If it were to be easily confused as either of those chords, could you use it in place of them?
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Seagull Entourage Rustic
Peavey 6505 212
Dunlop ZW-45 Crybaby
#12
Quote by engineno9
Er yeah, I meant minor sorry haha

So would then it be Emin9b or Emin9? I'm guessing Emin9b? Just as A would be Amin9 because of the full step between A and B.. All diatonic to C I mean

Chord NAMES are relevant to the root note of the chord and applicable to any key.

So if you're in C Major and played an Em9 it would be spelled E G B D F#.
Em9 is not diatonic to C Major due to the F#. If you flatten that note then you have F and it would be Em7b9.

The key you are in is not relevant to the name of the chord.

============
EDIT:
Quote by PatrickDavid
correct buddy

some people like to really spell out the chords when writing them,
I know for example on one exam this year the tutor was so strict we wanted the full use of brackets,

i.e:

Amin9

Amin9 (maj7)

or

Emin9b

Emin (9b)

you really don't have to be that strict though
Or maybe you do...
In the first example Amin9 and Amin9(maj7) - those are two different chords. One is a minor seventh chord with an extended major 9th the other is a minor major seventh chord with an extended major 9th.
(Though i would have written it Am/Maj9)

The second example - what is it/ The first looks like a E minor 7th chord with an extended min 9. The second possibly an Em chord with an added min 9?
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 20, 2011,
#13
hey patrick. i watched a little of your vid on seventh chords. i only watched the major seventh chord and that was it. i have a solid grasp of chord construction so I was just watching out of interest.

i noticed that you went through various names.
CMajor7
CMaj7
CM7

but you didn't mention CΔ7 The triangle is sometimes =Major while some use it as =Major7.
I look at CΔ as a C Major 7 chord because if the chord were C Major then C would suffice. But then the same logic could be used for CMaj which I would take as C Major (not necessarily a Major 7 chord) so maybe my logic is flawed. When I write though I always put the 7 CΔ7.

Despit the confusion I think it's good in such a lesson just to mention it. It takes two seconds to mention it and then when the noob comes across it they don't say wtf?? they say "oh hey that's a Major 7, sweet".

Anyway I like that you're out there doing your thing. Good Luck.
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
hey patrick. i watched a little of your vid on seventh chords. i only watched the major seventh chord and that was it. i have a solid grasp of chord construction so I was just watching out of interest.

i noticed that you went through various names.
CMajor7
CMaj7
CM7

but you didn't mention CΔ7 The triangle is sometimes =Major while some use it as =Major7.
I look at CΔ as a C Major 7 chord because if the chord were C Major then C would suffice. But then the same logic could be used for CMaj which I would take as C Major (not necessarily a Major 7 chord) so maybe my logic is flawed. When I write though I always put the 7 CΔ7.

Despit the confusion I think it's good in such a lesson just to mention it. It takes two seconds to mention it and then when the noob comes across it they don't say wtf?? they say "oh hey that's a Major 7, sweet".

Anyway I like that you're out there doing your thing. Good Luck.


Thankyou 20tigers for taking the time to reply,
That is a brilliant insight!

An annotation will be added in, very well spotted!

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#15
Patrick, I looked at your video, and was happy to see that your theory was pretty solid on this. Refreshing for a change. Many people post videos as teasers and there's a lot of pomp and circumstance but very little substance. Not a fan of your Notes video (or anyone else's way of teaching that concept, for that matter), and didn't watch the others, and that's only since I'm biased to the way I teach them, (so that's not a personal thing against yours) but I would just add that the 9th in a chord leaves a hanging, unresolved sound as the 2/9 wants to go/resolve to the 3rd or the root...it's a tension note that when used inteligently can add a lot of flavor.

Second, the delta 9 or delta 7 are valid observations, on 20t's part but I've only seen that used in "Jazz shorthand".

Overall, good, linear explanations on the 9th chords.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 21, 2011,
#16
Quote by Sean0913
Patrick, I looked at your video, and was happy to see that your theory was pretty solid on this. Refreshing for a change. Many people post videos as teasers and there's a lot of pomp and circumstance but very little substance. Not a fan of your Notes video (or anyone else's way of teaching that concept, for that matter), and didn't watch the others, and that's only since I'm biased to the way I teach them, (so that's not a personal thing against yours) but I would just add that the 9th in a chord leaves a hanging, unresolved sound as the 2/9 wants to go/resolve to the 3rd or the root...it's a tension note that when used inteligently can add a lot of flavor.

Second, the delta 9 or delta 7 are valid observations, on 20t's part but I've only seen that used in "Jazz shorthand".

Overall, good, linear explanations on the 9th chords.

Best,

Sean


Thanks for the kind words Sean,
Everyone has different methods like said,
I like the finding the notes concept, but I'll be going through a few different options in the end just to explain that there's always a few different methods,

different approaches working for different people, and all that jazz,

Thankyou for taking the time to write a response,

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic