#2
Bit difficult to hear clearly.

It's I - vi in B Major. Bmaj7 - G sharp minor
Last edited by mdc at Dec 20, 2011,
#3
Quote by mdc
Bit difficult to hear clearly.

It's I - vi in B Major. Bmaj7 - G sharp minor


I - vi? What's that?
#4
Quote by guitarchild2003
I - vi? What's that?

Roman numerals are a way to notate chords and chord progressions in relation to their key. They have the advantage of making it possible to analyse (and therefore, hopefully, understand) chords outside of the context of a specific key. For instance, an E major chord when played in the key of A major works the same way as a G major chord in the key of C major. They are both the major chord built on the fifth degree of a major scale, and can therefore be referred to as V.

Capital letters are major chords and lowercase letters are minor chords. The number is the degree of the scale to which the root of the chord corresponds.

So a I - vi in B major would be B - G#m like mdc said.
A I - vi in, say, G major would be G - Em.

If you take the chords from the notes of the major and minor scales, you'll find that the ones that are minor, major, etc. are always the same in relation to the key (which does make a lot of sense). So there's a "formula" that tells you which chords you can "find" in a scale:

For a major scale: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viiº (º means diminished)
For a natural minor scale: i - iiº - III - iv - v - VI - VII

The V chord also tends to sound very good in minor keys, and it's actually (arguably) more used than the v. The reasons for that have to do with leading tones and the harmonic minor scale, but that's a whole different story (look them up, I'm sure there's stuff about them here on UG).

(Of course then there are chord extensions, suspended chords, etc. which can also be contained in those scales. And, very importantly, you're not in any way bound to just these chords! You can really use any chord you want in any key. But these do have a greater tendency to sound good.)
Last edited by sickman411 at Dec 20, 2011,
#5
Quote by sickman411
Roman numerals are a way to notate chords and chord progressions in relation to their key. They have the advantage of making it possible to analyse (and therefore, hopefully, understand) chords outside of the context of a specific key. For instance, an E major chord when played in the key of A major works the same way as a G major chord in the key of C major. They are both the major chord built on the fifth degree of a major scale, and can therefore be referred to as V.

Capital letters are major chords and lowercase letters are minor chords. The number is the degree of the scale to which the root of the chord corresponds.

So a I - vi in B major would be B - G#m like mdc said.
A I - vi in, say, G major would be G - Em.

If you take the chords from the notes of the major and minor scales, you'll find that the ones that are minor, major, etc. are always the same in relation to the key (which does make a lot of sense). So there's a "formula" that tells you which chords you can "find" in a scale:

For a major scale: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - viiº (º means diminished)
For a natural minor scale: i - iiº - III - iv - v - VI - VII

The V chord also tends to sound very good in minor keys, and it's actually (arguably) more used than the v. The reasons for that have to do with leading tones and the harmonic minor scale, but that's a whole different story (look them up, I'm sure there's stuff about them here on UG).

(Of course then there are chord extensions, suspended chords, etc. which can also be contained in those scales. And, very importantly, you're not in any way bound to just these chords! You can really use any chord you want in any key. But these do have a greater tendency to sound good.)



Woah, Thanks alot!!
Although i never did scales before (self teaching myself for a few weeks) Imma try and look more into scales and see if i can learn it more before i attempt to play the song.

When you played it with your scale version was it a success for you?
#6
Quote by guitarchild2003
When you played it with your scale version was it a success for you?

I have no idea of what you're asking...

And if you've only been playing/learning theory for a few weeks, don't really worry about what I said in that last post just yet. It might confuse you a bit. Learn the major scale, the minor scale (how to build them, not just the shapes!), chord formation, what a key is, and then look at what I said in my last post. If you're interested in learning theory, that is. And take your time. Try everything you learn until you actually know how to use it.