#1
So I recently started trying to write solo's and I am just not sure if what I am doing is working. I feel I get really caught up in trying to incorporate techniques and speed to try and pass myself off as a good guitarist. Since it is me playing I am kinda blind to weather or not I am on the right track since I think everything I do is terrible and needs improvement. Advice on what to work on and where to go would be appreciated.

Solo I Wrote

Solo I improv'd
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#2
I feel the same way about my own solos!
You are on the right track, try putting a little more feeling into your playing, as you seem to be trying a little too hard to sound good (I don't mean to sound mean) as your playing sounds forced. Also, crank up your volume in the mix, as we can barely hear you play.
#3
I can't really hear you soloing properly in the vids, but from what I can make out it's ok.
1st vid: I don't know...does anyone else recon he's soloing in a major key over a what seems to be a minor progression at times - which sounds a lot like the chorus to Second Heartbeat - Avenged Sevenfold some parts just feel odd to me. But granted that you most likely seem to be playing in a metal genre of sorts, your style seems appropriate.

But my improv is shocking don't ask me about that
#4
Quote by Sheepbane
So I recently started trying to write solo's and I am just not sure if what I am doing is working. I feel I get really caught up in trying to incorporate techniques and speed to try and pass myself off as a good guitarist. Since it is me playing I am kinda blind to weather or not I am on the right track since I think everything I do is terrible and needs improvement. Advice on what to work on and where to go would be appreciated.


I think you have a good sense of the problem with your solos. It's way too technical and not remotely musically interesting.

How's your ear? I ask because both of these solos are completely absent any sense of melody, so when you say you wrote the first one, it almost feels like you just strung a bunch of tricks together.

So, first of all, work on your ear.

Secondly, start with a melody. A solo isn't a series of licks -it's a musical idea. You use licks and tricks to embellish the melody, not as the foundation for a solo. You should be able to sing the melody line of the solo and have it sound interesting ... and then you throw in licks to embellish it and amp it up.

It may help you in your composing to make your first couple of passes to an undistorted rhythm track - so you can actually clearly hear how the notes you pick play off the notes in the chord progression. That's pretty hard to hear with a heavily distorted rhythm guitar.

But really you need to start with melody, which is almost complete absent from these examples.
#5
Im going to be brutally honest but i think you need to hear this.

1. Your solo had very little of a rhythmic pulse to it. None of it made me wanna nod my head or tap my foot.

2. No vibrato or bends at all.

3. No definate start or ending to the solo. I like to start or end my solo with a statement that grabs the listeners attention. A huge bend is a good way to do this.

4. You didn't let the music breathe. It was just a constant flurry of notes.

5. The notes seemed to clash with the chords at certain times. Do you have any knowlege of music theory ?

6. You used one technique throughout the entire solo. Sweeping. Where are the bends, vibrato, slides, pinch harmonics, natural harmonics, pick slides, double stops, trills, string skipping etc etc. Vary up your techniques.

Listen to these players

Gary Moore
Adrian Smith
Michael Schenker
David Gilmour
Randy Rhodes

Notice that they all have mind blowing melodic sense, vocal like vibrato, unique and varied phrasing and varied techniques.

I don't care if rustey cooley can play 30 notes in a second. He's a shit guitar player. The above guys would blow rustey cooley off stage if you gave them 3 notes