#1
which is easier ?? and what is the diference ?? could we have a pitch problem in amplified vocals ?? thnx
#2
Uh what? Well from the moment anyone in your band is louder than your acoustic vocals you need to amplify em...
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#3
Uh, amplified vocals might need eq/a mic specifically chosen for the persons voice... uh, keep the vocals on top in terms of volume... not sure what you want here.
#4
Well, amplifying your vocals will not change the pitch of the vocals. What it will do is bring to light the fact that your singer is out of tune, but because you could never hear him before, you didn't realize it.

Another factor is that it does take some getting used to. Singing in a room with an acoustic guitar, everything behaves the way you think it will. Plugging in over a band and singing through a PA is a weird experience at first. I mean, you KNOW that sound is coming from your mouth, but you'll be damned if you can hear it.... and hearing your voice come out on the other side of the room instead can be a bit disorienting.

Until you get used to it, this "disoriented feeling" may well throw off your concentration or technique and therefore your pitch - at first.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Contrary to what axemanchris said, I've found myself having to pitch higher to get what I hear in my head... so, if you're recording like me, you might need EQ because of the proximity effect.
#6
EQ will add brightness (or reduce boominess.... or whatever) but won't actually change the pitch of the note. You can't turn an Ab into an A with EQ.

I'm wondering why you think you need to accommodate for the PA by pitching higher when you sing. Surely you not suggesting that if I held a microphone up to a tuning fork ringing at A440 that the resulting sound coming from the speakers would be anything other than A440.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
EQ will add brightness (or reduce boominess.... or whatever) but won't actually change the pitch of the note. You can't turn an Ab into an A with EQ.

I'm wondering why you think you need to accommodate for the PA by pitching higher when you sing. Surely you not suggesting that if I held a microphone up to a tuning fork ringing at A440 that the resulting sound coming from the speakers would be anything other than A440.

CT


What I hear in my head seems to be higher than what I get in real life. At least without EQ, recorded through Reaper. I don't know why.

EDIT: Actually, it also seems to do that on my friends PA. It's a pretty cheap PA, plus it was in a very loud guitar-and-drum environment. That's probably why - I couldn't pitch right, period.
Last edited by Cowless at Dec 23, 2011,
#9
I actually figured out that the cause was mic distance. Too close = boomy. Get a ruler out and stay 3-6 inches away for a live performance, and up to a foot for recording, depending on preferred sound.
#10
A lot of people have pitch issues when they start singing with a mike because they're not used to hearing themselves that way and it throws them off.

eg, go to an open mike night. Most of the inexperienced people will struggle with pitch on the first 2-3 lines of their first song, while they get used to it - because it's DIFFERENT and they haven't practiced specifically for it.
#11
I have two voices. A non-mic'd voice and a mic'd voice. When I'm on a mic, I kind of adapt to the dynamics of the microphone to produce the exact sound I want. It can change from mic to mic as well because they all respond differently.

Mess around with it a little and find what works for you.