#1
I was learning the song Dee by rhandy rhodes and is this a good way to figure out the key?

What I was trying to do was hear the prominent melody in the beginning of the song and figure out where that melody resolves and it sounded like D and it is in D major. The bass notes where kind of confusing me because they don't really speak out that much but I just think of them as just part of the melody to enhance the song. All I do when trying to figure out what key a song is in is pick out the prominent melody whether it be a riff or whatever and figure where it resolves and I just think of all the other notes as just being part of the key or just accidentals. This is how I go about writing as well.

So is this a good way to do it?
#2
It depends on the song; typically, the melody is the easiest point in the piece to follow most of the time. However, it should be noted that resolution rests on the harmony rather than the melody, so it's not necessarily the most concise method of figuring out your key. Since Dee is a solo performance, however, you're kind of stuck with the melody a lot of the time, so it's kind of a matter of knowing when to do what rather than a definite "right" and "wrong" way to use your ears.
modes are a social construct
#3
I see. Even if there is harmony such as chords etc. I will usually just listen to the bass notes of the chords first and then figure out the maj or min quality.
#4
Quote by Unreal T
I see. Even if there is harmony such as chords etc. I will usually just listen to the bass notes of the chords first and then figure out the maj or min quality.


What if it's an inversion?

shit just got real, son
modes are a social construct
#5
It's Randy Rhoads, it can basically be a one of gazillion scales. But yeah your way's good except for bands like Slayer who break the scales a lot. What I'm trying to say is that you can't always look for the scale by just thinking simply because the music world i extremely wide and the scale is just a guide which you choose to or not to use it. Hope that helped someway.
#6
finding the tonal centre is definitely a good way (by that I mean which note the music wants to resolve to). from there it's nice to know whether you're talking phrygian, major, diminished, whole tone, or what, but the tonal centre's the most important bit really. even Vaughn Williams wasn't too sure about things like this at times - his fifth symphony is in 'D Major', but the very first notes imply a very very strong D Mixolydian feel, so it's more often referred to as just being 'in D', rather than 'D Major', because even VW himself wasn't too sure whether it was D Mixolydian or G Major or C Lydian or what.
#7
Quote by theknuckster
finding the tonal centre is definitely a good way (by that I mean which note the music wants to resolve to). from there it's nice to know whether you're talking phrygian, major, diminished, whole tone, or what, but the tonal centre's the most important bit really. even Vaughn Williams wasn't too sure about things like this at times - his fifth symphony is in 'D Major', but the very first notes imply a very very strong D Mixolydian feel, so it's more often referred to as just being 'in D', rather than 'D Major', because even VW himself wasn't too sure whether it was D Mixolydian or G Major or C Lydian or what.




modes are a social construct