#1
Im working on a super strat made of mahogany right now, and I was going to just oil the body to finish it. I'm using some shellac on the headstock to math the satin nitro that it came with and I was wondering if I could just apply the shellac straight on the raw mahogany? I dont want to grain fill at all! wouldn't I be able to just apply multiple coats of shellac therefore making it act as a grainfiller and a finishing product?
#2
Even multiple coats will not be thick enough. Shellac or lacquer is just not thick enough to fill in pours by itself.
#9
Quote by zubin.isaac
That sounds pretty awesome!


Don't go for a glossy finish then. It'll look horrible without a grain filled base.

A smooth satin or oil finish will look good though if you wish to retain the textured open pour look.
Last edited by earthwormjim at Dec 23, 2011,
#10
Shellac that's been buffed and polished out will fill open grain over multiple passes, the loose particles will fill in the dips and voids if you go at it long enough. I've done a lot of woodworking using vintage and period-correct tools and the processes associated with it. Shellac will fill the grain eventually, just prepare your arm for a workout.

EDIT: Check out a Faded Gibson if you're curious how it will turn out without grain filler using a modern finishing approach, I personally dig the open pore feel of wood.

EDITx2: A quick Googling confirms this, though I've never sanded down with the grits they're recommending. And I've always used it as the finish as well, I'm not sure on how they're finishing it after leveling the grain. http://www.hardwoodlumberandmore.com/Articles/ArticleViewPage/tabid/75/ArticleId/17/Grain-Filling-with-Shellac.aspx
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Dec 23, 2011,
#11
Quote by Flux'D
Shellac that's been buffed and polished out will fill open grain over multiple passes, the loose particles will fill in the dips and voids if you go at it long enough. I've done a lot of woodworking using vintage and period-correct tools and the processes associated with it. Shellac will fill the grain eventually, just prepare your arm for a workout.

EDIT: Check out a Faded Gibson if you're curious how it will turn out without grain filler using a modern finishing approach, I personally dig the open pore feel of wood.

EDITx2: A quick Googling confirms this, though I've never sanded down with the grits they're recommending. And I've always used it as the finish as well, I'm not sure on how they're finishing it after leveling the grain. http://www.hardwoodlumberandmore.com/Articles/ArticleViewPage/tabid/75/ArticleId/17/Grain-Filling-with-Shellac.aspx


Seems like more work than just rubbing on grain filler (or even dry wall filler) one time, wiping it off, then sanding it flush.
#12
^Yes, but the end product looks different and more natural/3D to the eye than filling in the grain with a paste. French polishing takes a hell of a lot more work than just buffing out a finish, but the end result is unique and classy to itself. A lot of timbers don't match well with off-the-shelf grain fillers also, black walnut being one. If I elect to fill the grain on Walnut for example I usually make my own slurry with glue and a bunch of fine sawdust to tint it.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]