#1
My band just finished our first EP. I was wondering if there was a way to make it so all the tracks are the same volume, because whenever I export the MP3s from my DAW they become too quiet. If there was any program or method to doing this, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks in advance
#2
Thats called mastering, and there are programs out there for that. Mastering is to do with how the tracks fade in, the levels, and the EQ. If you do mastering, your tracks will most likely sound better afterwards anyways if you do a good job of it
#3
I use Izotope Ozone.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#5
Actually, I might be able to do with it the program I have, would any one be able to tell me how to use compression?
#6
Just make sure they're all peaking at roughly the same level, bounce wav's, then import them all into the same project and add a limiter to the master and then bounce mp3s for each individual songs from that master.

Check out my mixing/'mastering' guide here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1490850
It's applicable even if you're not a metal band.
Let's party.
Last edited by Odirunn at Dec 22, 2011,
#7
Quote by jengel13
My band just finished our first EP. I was wondering if there was a way to make it so all the tracks are the same volume, because whenever I export the MP3s from my DAW they become too quiet. If there was any program or method to doing this, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks in advance


If you want to send the tracks over we can master them for you
https://dropbox.yousendit.com/BeautifullyDistorted
#8
Any DAW should be able to do it.

Just a little bit of context here....

"Mastering", strictly defined, is the process of transferring a final mix to a finished master copy. In the old days, this was the process of playing the tape to a wax master for pressing to vinyl. Hence the term "mastering."

In the old days, all mastering involved was a little bit of EQ to balance out the sound of the mixes from track to track (that "consistency of tone" from track to track, along with determining the flow of the tracks and the order of the songs was/is still part of mastering. "Mastering" was, until very recently, almost never done to a single song.) Sometimes, if there was too much dynamic range, the signal from the tape would be enough to bounce the cutter right out of the wax master and ruin the master. This would be akin to a vinyl record with too much dynamic range bouncing the needle right out of the groove. The solution was to add some compression to limit the dynamic range, and therefore keep the cutter from going AWOL during the cutting of the wax master.

As the decades went by, there was more and more pressure to make mixes louder. Commercials were louder because it was determined that louder things are more likely to be paid attention to. People started doing the same with music. The loudness war was begun.

Over the past couple of decades, everyone tries to slam their mix as hard as they can to make it as loud as they can because they believe that louder sounds better. But did anyone ever complain about the sound quality on the Beatles or Zeppelin albums? Pink Floyd, anyone? You listen back to those along side something by Nickelback or Linkin Park or whoever, and those great sounding, classic albums are.... quiet.

Watch your meters. The Zeppelin album will have the meters bouncing up and down like you figure they should be. The Nickelback album will see the meters fluttering between -2 and 0db and hardly moving otherwise.

Now there are some good reasons why "compressed" *can* be perceived as sounding better, but I think it is simply most fair to say it sounds "different" from "not too compressed." I like the compressed sound, but to say that Limp Bizkit recordings sound better than Floyd recordings is amusing at best.

In short, you achieve this "mastered" sound with EQ, compression and limiting. Those Izotope and T-Racks software basically do just that, only with settings. You need to be careful, though, because some undesirable artefacts can creep in. You want to avoid that pumping and breathing sound associated with over-compression or by using excessive settings.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.