#1
I tried searching "octave pedal" but didn't find anything to answer my specific question..........Could I use an octave pedal to simulate what I might get from a five string with a low B?

For example, if I wanted to catch a D that's lower than I could get out of an open D on a 4 string bass, could I simply use an octave pedal instead of drop-tuning or buying a fiver?

I'm very much a bass novice, so please forgive me if this is a silly question. I'm just trying to get an idea from some people who have no interest in selling me one.

Thanks in advance.......
#3
Nothing really, other than convenience/laziness.

I've been trying some hip-hop and other songs than sound like they might be done on something with a lower range than my 4 banger can do.

Oddly enough, I'm trying to avoid buying another bass........which seems silly now that I've written it.
#4
Oooooooooookay. No. Octave pedals do not work very well with bass and they certainly won't get the tone of a low B. Just drop tune or put BEAD strings on your bass.

How is buying a pedal the more convenient solution?
#5
Quote by Spaz91
Oooooooooookay. No. Octave pedals do not work very well with bass and they certainly won't get the tone of a low B. Just drop tune or put BEAD strings on your bass.

How is buying a pedal the more convenient solution?


Hmmm, from what I've read, it appears that octave pedals are a typical bass effect. I'm not really looking to get to a low B; an octave lower E would be fine at this point.

I thought the pedal would be more convenient since it would extend the range of a bass I already have. Instead of re-learning my patterns, I could simply step on it to do the lower stuff.

Re-stringing to BEAD might work too though.

Thanks for the input.
#7
I agree. I think we're misunderstanding each other; I'm just looking to lower my E string an octave.

In reviews of various octave pedals, the reviewers seem to have consensus that a digital pedal will track lower notes better than an analog pedal. I dunno. They seem happy with the tracking of $150 pedals
#8
I suppose you could go to a music store and see if the Morpheus Drop Tune pedal will work with a bass. If it does, then you might be able to pull it off. But most pitch-shifters (of any sort) simply don't track well enough and they seriously color your sound.
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#9
I'm confused as to why you'd want an octave lower than your E string I am yet to hear a bass tuned lower than F# and I'm yet to hear even that done well or in a good context.

And stringing BEAD won't even get you close to that.
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#10
Quote by gilly_90
I'm confused as to why you'd want an octave lower than your E string I am yet to hear a bass tuned lower than F# and I'm yet to hear even that done well or in a good context.

And stringing BEAD won't even get you close to that.


I guess I'm falling short on explaining that it is actually a lower D that I truly want. Instead of simply drop tuning my E string to get a lower D, I thought an octave pedal could get me a lower D than the normal open D on a 4 banger. If this isn't what an octave pedal does, then I guess it's not the solution I'm looking for.
#11
No its not and to concur with Spaz, getting a good tone and accuracy is going to be dodgy.

Seriously--downtuning is not the end of the world nor is getting a 5 string bass at some point.
#12
Alright, thanks everyone. I truly appreciate the inputs. I guess a fiver is in my future.
#14
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Or replace your E string tuning post with a D-tuner?

Edit: To clarify, I find that d-tuning to D sounds a little tighter than downtuning. Tighter, more defined, more impactful.


OK, you're talking about one of those tuning machine gadgets being more effective than simply backing off the standard tuner to a D?

I've been curious about them but wondered whether or not they actually worked.

Probably the simplest solution all things considered.

Any recommendations on brand?
#16
There's hipshot I know of. FYI because I looked into this, you cant buy four and just slap your bass into D standard.

And to add some input into the octave pedal. I got a Boss OC-3 for $30 last year, and it's a cool pedal, but they seriously color your tone past 1/2 up on the first octave down, any lower and it gets this kind of synthy skipping/slipping which sounds ok in it's own right (most bass synth pedals are a octaver, fuzz and env. filter combined) it also had distortion and polyphonic octave which sounded like an organ.

Drop tuning is your best bet as is a 5 string. What bass and amp do you have now? I think a lot of hip hop and reggae etc. will use a midi or keys to get lower when bass can't that's when reggae musicians actually started converting from 4 to 5 stringers to keep up.
#17
Quote by askrere
There's hipshot I know of. FYI because I looked into this, you cant buy four and just slap your bass into D standard.

And to add some input into the octave pedal. I got a Boss OC-3 for $30 last year, and it's a cool pedal, but they seriously color your tone past 1/2 up on the first octave down, any lower and it gets this kind of synthy skipping/slipping which sounds ok in it's own right (most bass synth pedals are a octaver, fuzz and env. filter combined) it also had distortion and polyphonic octave which sounded like an organ.

Drop tuning is your best bet as is a 5 string. What bass and amp do you have now? I think a lot of hip hop and reggae etc. will use a midi or keys to get lower when bass can't that's when reggae musicians actually started converting from 4 to 5 stringers to keep up.


2 votes for the Hipshot; good

I've been reading about the MXR M288, and there seem to be lots of comments on good tracking. I believe the review here on UG for the 288 or its predecessor mentioned it "puts out a note one octave lower than the one you play" or something close to that, which is what got me going on the idea when reading similar comments around the web.

I'm surprised at the warnings regarding tone coloring and tracking since there are some units out there being trumpeted as not having those problems.....but don't misunderstand, all the advice I've been given here is well taken. I trust you folks know what you're talking about.

Right now I'm playing an Epi T-bird Goth and a modified Bronco through a Rumble 30 - nothing fancy, to be sure.

I've been eying up the Squier Jazz 5er (the cheap one), but thought maybe the pedal would be a more pragmatic choice. I have no effects yet and thought it might be a fun gadget to play with.
#18
I've owned a few Octave pedals: Boss OC-2, Boss OC-3, EBS Octabass, and a Digitech Whammy IV...

They are, in no way, a substitute for an actual bass tuned lower.

The simple reason is that they have poor tracking. Unless you only play long held out notes, they won't suffice. They all tend to distort and have attack-to-sound-delay that makes actual bass playing on them difficult.

They are great pedals when playing in a higher register... with other pedals... or if you WANT the glitchy effect to the,


But seriously, just tune your bass lower if you want.

Further more, Octave pedals are expensive... if the lowness is THAT much of an issue, for the same price you can pick up a cheap SX or Squire and set it up as an always-low bass.
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#19
Watch your reviews. If they are on a seller's website, they can be dodgy. Having bought items from Musician's Friend etc, the first thing they will do is email you asking for a "review". Unless a product is horrible, most people are in love with what they buy within the first few tries, and later will be more cognizant of a products shortfalls.
#20
Quote by Molochnik


I'm surprised at the warnings regarding tone coloring and tracking since there are some units out there being trumpeted as not having those problems.....but don't misunderstand, all the advice I've been given here is well taken. I trust you folks know what you're talking about.

Right now I'm playing an Epi T-bird Goth and a modified Bronco through a Rumble 30 - nothing fancy, to be sure.

I've been eying up the Squier Jazz 5er (the cheap one), but thought maybe the pedal would be a more pragmatic choice. I have no effects yet and thought it might be a fun gadget to play with.


First as always is the case with these questions, you need a new amp first for all this low bass.

second argue all you want about us telling you different about the reviews, but we all have played them so what we are saying isn't lies or misinformation, it's just a review you don't want to hear.
#21
Quote by askrere
First as always is the case with these questions, you need a new amp first for all this low bass.

second argue all you want about us telling you different about the reviews, but we all have played them so what we are saying isn't lies or misinformation, it's just a review you don't want to hear.


I apologize if I seemed argumentative. I was simply making a comment about the difference between the reviews and propaganda, and the real-world advice I'm getting here. I suppose if I had taken the thought further in what I wrote, I could've mentioned that it is precisely the advice given here that has deterred me from buying one now.

I have no problem using one of the recommended solutions; the machine head seems the most attractive at this point from a cost/benefit perspective.

Thanks again everyone.