#1
Hey everybody! I'm new here. Just started learning guitar seriously a few months ago.

So I'm wondering if there is a way to name chords that don't traditionally exist. I have come across a few chords I like just messing around and I believe that they sound good. I did a reverse chord search and they definitely aren't normal, but is there a way to take each of the notes in the chord and use them to classify it as something more than just "a G chord I made up?" Which notes are important besides the root and what do they do to the name?

One of the chords specifically is just an E major shape slid up a half step (standard tuning), if that helps.

Thanks and happy holidays!
#2
A lot of times you might you've made up a chord only to find out it's an inversion of an existing chord -the same chord, but with the third or fifth an octave lower or higher.

I think there's a term for shifting existing chord patterns down the neck...
guitar-centric chords?
I couldn't find that term, but I think that's what it is.
Mean People Suck.
#4
023300 is a B of sorts. According to a chord naming program, but you can also call it an E since technically the root note is E. So its an e of sorts, a B of sorts, And F of sorts (using the D string as the root), an Ab (using the G string as a root), again, a b, using the b string as a root, and....an e using the sixth string as a root.
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#5
i think the chord sprezzatura was talking about is a E#5b9sus4 or some other complicated thing i dont know all the inversions
#6
Quote by sprezzatura
One of the chords specifically is just an E major shape slid up a half step (standard tuning), if that helps.

It can be an Fmaj7#11 (with no 9th) in third inversion. Making it an Fmaj7#11/E.
Oh, and there's a "name that chord" thread. It's a sticky -- easy to find!
#7
Given pre-existing conventions about intervals and chords, there is almost always some way you can find to name a mystery chord. This might bring in devises such as slash chords and other such complications.

That said, there might be a number of chords out there that you just have to be loose with your description about. For example, I feel little choice but to call this (x57557) a "D13 without a 3rd". Root, 5th, b7, 9, 13.
#8
Hmmm interesting. I guess I need to learn about inversions.

Quote by sickman411
It can be an Fmaj7#11 (with no 9th) in third inversion. Making it an Fmaj7#11/E.
Oh, and there's a "name that chord" thread. It's a sticky -- easy to find!


Thanks, I'll find it!
#9
Quote by sprezzatura
Hey everybody! I'm new here. Just started learning guitar seriously a few months ago.

So I'm wondering if there is a way to name chords that don't traditionally exist. I have come across a few chords I like just messing around and I believe that they sound good. I did a reverse chord search and they definitely aren't normal, but is there a way to take each of the notes in the chord and use them to classify it as something more than just "a G chord I made up?" Which notes are important besides the root and what do they do to the name?

One of the chords specifically is just an E major shape slid up a half step (standard tuning), if that helps.

Thanks and happy holidays!


I can pretty much put a name on any "chord" you play even if it ends up as a ridiculously long one. If it has a letter ascribed to it, I can do it. Play E and F together and I'll call it an E add b9 (no 3rd or 5th)

Play E F G A B C, and I'll turn it into an Em add b9, 11, b13.

"You can't win....but there are alternatives to fighting..."

Best,

Sean