#1
I want to write chord progressions that have a more bluesy/jazzy feel to them. I really became interested in this particular type of sound after going through Gabe Bondoc's youtube account. I just love the progressions in all the things that he does. I've started using some of them progressions by spicing up some of the chords I use now by adding in the occasional add9 or mm7 w/o the fifth.

Are there any other resources that I can use to help me write better in this particular style?
#2
Pretty much just add 7ths, 9ths and 13ths to all or at least the important chords in the progression if you want to make an existing progression sound jazzier, or get really familiar with ii V(altered) I progressions.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#4
An altered dominant is A V7 chord, but with either a flat or sharp 9, sharp 11, flat 13 (or #5, same thing) or all three. It gives a ii-V-I a more interesting and more authentic jazz sound than just a regular, strictly diatonic one. Examples: C7alt is C E Bb with some combination of Db or D#, F#, and Ab.
Quote by bearded_monkey
Everytime I go into the guitar shop and ask for a G-String the shopkeeper always makes that TERRIBLE joke about it not being an underwear shop

So next time I go in I'm gonna ask for a thong
#5
Learn all these shapes:

Gmaj7   Gm7    G7   Gm7b5
--------------------------------------
---3------3------3------2-----------------
---4------3------4------3-----------------
---4------3------3------3-----------------
--------------------------------------
---3------3------3------3-----------------


Gmaj7   Gm7    G7      Gm7b5
-----------10--------------------------
---12------11------8-------11---------------
---11------10------10------10-----------------
---12--------------9-------11------------
---10------10------10------10-----------------
--------------------------------------


Gmaj7   Gm7   G7   Gm7b5
--7------6------7------6------------------
--7------6------6------6------------------
--7------7------7------6------------------
--5------5------5------5------------------
--------------------------------------
--------------------------------------



  G6  G6  Gmaj9 G6add9 Gmaj7 G6  Gmaj9  Gmaj7#5  Gmaj7#11
------------------5----7-------------------------------------
---3----5----3----5----7-----12-----10------4----2----------------
---4----4----2----4----4-----9------11------4----4---------------
---2----5----4----5----------9------9-------4----4--------------
-----------------------5-----10-----10--------------------
---3----3----3----3----3--------------------3----3--------



Not sure those last two altered chords will be all that useful to you, but I just copied and pasted these from an old lesson. Basically, all these grips that skip a string to eliminate the need for barring will sound jazzier than your typical barred seventh chords. Skipping a string opens the chords up a bit and allows for easier alterations and extensions. You'll find other useful chords as you take these basic shapes and experiment with them a bit.
#6
Very good post^^

Learn those shapes TS and then learn the following:

When I see this:
e|-------|
B|---5---|
G|---5---|
D|---5---|
A|-------|
E|---5---|

(Am7 chord)

I see this:

e|---|---|---|---|---|-b9|---|---|---|---|---|---|
B|---|---|---|*b5|-[B]P5[/B]|-#5|-M6|---|---|---|---|---|
G|---|---|---|-M2|-[B]m3[/B]|-M3|-P4|---|---|---|---|---|
D|---|---|---|bb7|-[B]m7[/B]|-M7|-P8|---|---|---|---|---|
A|---|---|-K-|---|-ii|---|iii|-IV|---|---|---|---|
E|-IV|---|-V-|---|-[B]R[/B]-|---|VII|---|---|---|---|---|
   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12


K = Key note (C for C Major in this case)
* = I see this also as an augmented 4th
I see bb7 also as a M6


The intervals are how they are to the A note in this case and not to C.

I know almost every Chord formula, and know how to construct the Major key so I can figure out how to build each chord.

The Roman numerals are the different degrees of chords I can choose If I want to stay diatonically in the key of C.

Now I already internalized how these alterations sound, so I just "feel" what sound i'm after and (for example) know that making the P5 a #5 gives me "that" sound.

There are more things I see things like chord substitutes and walking bass possibilities, but this imo is the essential basic for jazz.

You will want to see all these intervals and the different scale degrees. I also see them differently with roots on the A and D string, but I cba to make a diagram for those as well, but I think you will get the point.

This is how I do it, and it works great for me.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 23, 2011,
#7
Ah ok...so how would i use the chord in context of a chord progression? Would I just stick to like a standard I-ii-V and just use the alternations and extensions while sticking to that jazz standard?

I came up with a chord progression of AMM7, f#dim/A, g#mm7, f#mm7, bmm7, E7...so what would this be?
#8
Quote by xGoozx
Ah ok...so how would i use the chord in context of a chord progression? Would I just stick to like a standard I-ii-V and just use the alternations and extensions while sticking to that jazz standard?

I came up with a chord progression of AMM7, f#dim/A, g#mm7, f#mm7, bmm7, E7...so what would this be?

It'd be good to see how you tab this out 2bh. Not sure about your chord theory. Theory ain't everyone's cuppa T though.

If you want to start writing jazzier progressions, without theory knowledge, then transcribe the chord progressions to Jazz standards, which, in all honestly aren't that different across the board. What makes every standard unique is the melody, not the chords.

Your question was answered with the very first reply, but to make any sense of it, you need to understand chord construction, and chord function.
#9
- play 3-5-7-9 or 3-5-6-9 of each chord. maybe even take out the fifth. let the bass take care of rooting the chord fundamentally, you take care of the quality and extensions.

- learn your altered extensions. b9 #9 #11 b13

- circle of fourths progressions

- secondary dominants/non-diatonic dominants. (like in a blues where you arbitrarily make I a I7 instead of maj7.

- tritone subs

- i played a christmas gig recently with some weird charts by some pianist named liz story. one thing you can do is a color chord progression where you take your melody and harmonize it with non-functional chords. so take the melody and instead of building the chord conventionally where the strong note of the melody is a basic chord tone, make it an extended or altered tone.

so like if your melody note is Eb, instead of playing a Cmin7 over it (like in the first bar of "autumn leaves") play a D7b9 where the melody note is the b9.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 24, 2011,
#10
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Very good post^^

Learn those shapes TS and then learn the following:

When I see this:
e|-------|
B|---5---|
G|---5---|
D|---5---|
A|-------|
E|---5---|

(Am7 chord)

I see this:

e|---|---|---|---|---|-b9|---|---|---|---|---|---|
B|---|---|---|*b5|-[B]P5[/B]|-#5|-M6|---|---|---|---|---|
G|---|---|---|-M2|-[B]m3[/B]|-M3|-P4|---|---|---|---|---|
D|---|---|---|bb7|-[B]m7[/B]|-M7|-P8|---|---|---|---|---|
A|---|---|-K-|---|-ii|---|iii|-IV|---|---|---|---|
E|-IV|---|-V-|---|-[B]R[/B]-|---|VII|---|---|---|---|---|
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12


K = Key note (C for C Major in this case)
* = I see this also as an augmented 4th
I see bb7 also as a M6


The intervals are how they are to the A note in this case and not to C.

I know almost every Chord formula, and know how to construct the Major key so I can figure out how to build each chord.

The Roman numerals are the different degrees of chords I can choose If I want to stay diatonically in the key of C.

Now I already internalized how these alterations sound, so I just "feel" what sound i'm after and (for example) know that making the P5 a #5 gives me "that" sound.

There are more things I see things like chord substitutes and walking bass possibilities, but this imo is the essential basic for jazz.

You will want to see all these intervals and the different scale degrees. I also see them differently with roots on the A and D string, but I cba to make a diagram for those as well, but I think you will get the point.

This is how I do it, and it works great for me.

Ah, of course! I forgot the very important step of learning to visualize the harmonized major scale of any key on the fretboard! A very good post, my friend! In my case, I always visualize a key in 1 of two ways, depending on whether or not my I chord is on the E string or the A string. If it's on the E string, I visualize as follows:

|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|ii-|---|iii|IV-|---|-V-|---|vi-|---|vii|---
|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|ii-|---|iii|---|---|---



If it's on the A string:

|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|ii-|---|iii|IV|---|
|---|iii|IV-|---|-V-|---|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|



When you start visualizing D string chords as well, you'll see even more chord possibilities:


E string Root:


|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|ii-|---|iii|IV-|
|ii-|---|iii|IV-|---|-V-|---|vi-|---|vii|---
|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|ii-|---|iii|IV-|---|---



A string root:


|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|ii-|---|iii|IV-|---|-V-|---|vi-|---|vii-|
|---|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|ii-|---|iii|IV|---|
|---|iii|IV-|---|-V-|---|vi-|---|vii|-I-|---|



And so on and so on. This is obviously a very basic construction, and you'll see that it's basically a representation of your standard major scale, but there's a big difference between knowing the intervals in a major scale and being able to instantly construct chords off of any degree without having to stop and think about it. The ability to do this comes from learning to construct chords off of every scale degree on the E, A and D strings in multiple positions. People often neglect D string chords because they don't produce as much volume as A and E string chords, but the ability to see a scale degree on the D string and instantly make a chord out of it is extremely beneficial, and should be practiced by any serious player. You should also learn to play chords on these strings that extend both in front of the root and behind the root, in terms of which frets you use. For example:

|---|-0-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|-0-|---|
|---|---|---|-0-|---|
|---|---|---|-0-|---|
|---|-0-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|



|-0-|---|---|---|---|
|---|-0-|---|---|---|
|-0-|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|-0-|---|---|
|---|---|---|-0-|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|


same root note, same chord, but one voicing extends behind the root and one extends above the root. Almost every chord you know can be voiced both ways, so you'd benefit from working out both versions.