#1
OK so me(Lead Guitar) and a friend(Vocals) have started a band. I invited a guy I know for keyboard and his room mate on drums and my friend brought over the guitarist and bassist from his old band. The reason that my friends old band broke up is because their lead guitarist(who wrote everything) quit. I found out that the guitarist being brought into this band just played what he was told to by the old lead guitarist. I didn't think much of it until we all jammed together and I discovered just how inexperienced he is. He has no basic knowledge of guitar and is barely able to even play power chords efficiently. So me and my friend decided we have to kick him out. The problem is that he is really good friends with the bassist and we're afraid that if we kick out the guitarist, the bassist will leave with him. So my question is this. How can we kick out the guitarist without the bassist leaving too?
#2
he probably knows he isn't very good since he isn't adding to the writting process just tell him that, if the bassist leaves, he leaves. shouldn't be a very huge blow to the band and honestly you could get by without one until you find someone else to fill the spot
#7
Look, sit down and talk to him. Treat him respect as a friend.

Talk to the bassist first, so you know what you're dealing with. "He's a great guy, but the chops just aren't there yet. He's holding us all back." If the bassist disagrees, then ask yourself if you'd rather have both of them or none of them.

Then sit down with the guy and say, "We like you, we enjoy your company a lot, but as I suspect you know you're just not in the same place skillwise as us, and that's really holding us back." If you like the guy I'd be inclined to give him some room to grow if he makes a real commitment to improving - taking lessons, practicing regularly, etc ... but otherwise you just have to nice, politely, respectfully explain why he's a bad fit.

Do it in person, by the way.
#8
Quote by HotspurJr
Look, sit down and talk to him. Treat him respect as a friend.

Talk to the bassist first, so you know what you're dealing with. "He's a great guy, but the chops just aren't there yet. He's holding us all back." If the bassist disagrees, then ask yourself if you'd rather have both of them or none of them.

Then sit down with the guy and say, "We like you, we enjoy your company a lot, but as I suspect you know you're just not in the same place skillwise as us, and that's really holding us back." If you like the guy I'd be inclined to give him some room to grow if he makes a real commitment to improving - taking lessons, practicing regularly, etc ... but otherwise you just have to nice, politely, respectfully explain why he's a bad fit.

Do it in person, by the way.

^+1

Do that.. Also, maybe fill the Bass player in beforehand so he's not taken by surprise... Be gentle and respectful... should go well..
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#9
Quote by HotspurJr
Look, sit down and talk to him. Treat him respect as a friend.

Talk to the bassist first, so you know what you're dealing with. "He's a great guy, but the chops just aren't there yet. He's holding us all back." If the bassist disagrees, then ask yourself if you'd rather have both of them or none of them.

Then sit down with the guy and say, "We like you, we enjoy your company a lot, but as I suspect you know you're just not in the same place skillwise as us, and that's really holding us back." If you like the guy I'd be inclined to give him some room to grow if he makes a real commitment to improving - taking lessons, practicing regularly, etc ... but otherwise you just have to nice, politely, respectfully explain why he's a bad fit.

Do it in person, by the way.


I concur.
Woffelz

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