#1
Is there any 'good' way of learning the modes? cause I really don't think going through each of the 12 keys In the differents is gonna be that easy to remember.
#2
Learn the formulas in relation to the major scale.

Bosh
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#3
Quote by steven seagull
Learn the formulas in relation to the major scale.

Bosh

This. Once you know the major scale, you know all the modes.

You can easily create a chart showing you how to play it, e.g. if you wanted to play something in phrygian, simply play the major scale 4 frets lower than the root note. (Google would probably actually find you one already made, but creating the chart will help you learn so I wouldn't recommend that).

You should really learn the proper theory behind it all, but I found that was a good way to get started.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#4
Just when you think it's coming to an end.



But yeah, do what they said above me, or something.

EDIT2: That arrow too me a saddeningly long time to make.

EDIT: Ooo, actually do that, down there.
   |
   |
\  |  /
 \ | /
   V
Last edited by jazz_rock_feel at Dec 23, 2011,
#5
Do you know all the major and minor keys (circle of fifths)?

Why do you think you need modes to progress in your playing? Unless you're playing CST (fairly common in jazz, but not really elsewhere, and even then a lot of people dislike the idea) you don't get much benefit from learning archaic scale structures for modal music you'll probably never run into in comparison to accidentals, chord tones, intervals, and aural efficiency
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#7
OMG he used the M word..
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#8
Quote by MikeDodge
Are you talking about memorizing them or actually applying them?

Those can be two different tasks...and one of them might not be "modal" at all.

applying
#9
Learning what intervals make up each mode and then knowing how to find the key of each mode ala knowing that Eb Lydian is in the key of Bb. Tis' all you need for application. Cheers. - Leo
#10
Quote by poisonousmetal
Is there any 'good' way of learning the modes? cause I really don't think going through each of the 12 keys In the differents is gonna be that easy to remember.

If you mean scale shapes, don't learn them, memorize the notes of a scale.
If you mean modes as in a modal center, don't learn them untill you fully understand basic theory and especially how a major and minor scale is constructed and tonal key centers.
#12
Quote by liampje
memorize the notes of a scale.

No. Memorize the intervals.
#13
Learn the differrent scale positions in the major scale, each scale starts on a differrent mode, but all the modes exist in all the scales because they are just ranges of notes within the scales, so the best way to understand modes is not through aplication on your instrument, but by getting it on paper. You need to Understand CDEFGABC IS C Ionian or DEFGABCD is D Dorian, modes in a key all share the same notes but take place at differrent ranges, the ranges all sound differrent from eachother, but any Ionian scale uses the same formjmula, all the dorian scles use the same musical formula, ect. So an Ionian Scale Transposed up 2 frets is still an Ionian scale played exactly the same (on gutiar not Piano, but the formula to construct the ionian scale is consistent amongst all keys)
Last edited by 123mac123 at Feb 12, 2012,
#14
I've got a tip. If you learn how to use accidentals you'll probably achieve whatever it is you want to do with modes anyway.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
There are many approaches to learning this stuff.
You will get different opinions from people on which way is the best, and some people will get rather vocal on how they are right and the other person is wrong.

A good approach IMO is to learn the scale (major, melodic minor and harmonic minor) in all positions up the fretboard, using scale shapes either in box positions or 3 note per string.
This method gives you a shape for each 'mode' and helps you learn them that way, which many will argue is limiting.

Another method/approach is to learn the formula for each 'mode' and play each one from the same starting note.

e.g
C major
Formula = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = C D E F G A B

Dorian
Formula = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 = C D Eb F G A Bb

etc, etc.....

Whichever method you use, just make sure you are aware of what is actually happening, the notes you are playing, their relation to the chord etc.
#16
Quote by Matt.Guitar
Another method/approach is to learn the formula for each 'mode' and play each one from the same starting note.

e.g
C major
Formula = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = C D E F G A B

Dorian
Formula = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 = C D Eb F G A Bb

etc, etc.....

Whichever method you use, just make sure you are aware of what is actually happening, the notes you are playing, their relation to the chord etc.

^ This is it. The parallel approach, rather than the derivative approach is the best way.

TS, since you're talking about application, ideally you need a loop pedal or something. Set up a single note drone, or single chord vamp, and work on one mode at at time.

Allan Holdsworth once said that it can take up to two years to become 100% familiar with a scale.

Get used to the sound of the mode. Being familiar with the sound is the most important. When your ear becomes familiar with the sound, you won't have to think about patterns or intervals anymore.
#17
Quote by mdc


TS, since you're talking about application, ideally you need a loop pedal or something. Set up a single note drone, or single chord vamp, and work on one mode at at time.
Get used to the sound of the mode. Being familiar with the sound is the most important. When your ear becomes familiar with the sound, you won't have to think about patterns or intervals anymore.


100% agree.

I like to set a one note drone, perhaps an alternating octave for interest, get a drum beat going and cycle through as many modes as I can think of.
#18
^ +1 to the drum beat as well. S'always good to try and keep things a little more lively, rather than a metronome.

That's where the Boss RC-2 is a good compact pedal.
#21
Quote by WastedRespect
Eb Lydian is in the key of Bb. Tis' all you need for application.


ragequit.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#22
i tried to take that post seriously, but i quickly found that i had WastedRespect
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#23
Quote by WastedRespect
Learning what intervals make up each mode and then knowing how to find the key of each mode ala knowing that Eb Lydian is in the key of Bb. Tis' all you need for application. Cheers. - Leo

Sir, you are one big fail.
#24
[
Allan Holdsworth once said that it can take up to two years to become 100% familiar with a scale.

Get used to the sound of the mode. Being familiar with the sound is the most important. When your ear becomes familiar with the sound, you won't have to think about patterns or intervals anymore.

point mdc...

holdsworths two years may be longer for most players..and he was not just running the scale up & down the neck..he used melodic patterns, intervals and the chords that the scale created..observing him play tells you this..he is not guessing at what works .. and yes to be that familier with a "scale" in all keys/positions will take that amount of time..in the beginning...the more scales you study and apply the above exercises..the easier it becomes...and the beauty of it is you begin to see the relationship between the 12 keys..and that you may explore several keys at once within one scale exercise..as some chords have multi-functions in different keys (E13=DMA7b5)..

wolf